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Google Gets Transparent With Glass, Its Augmented Reality Project

Google Gets Transparent With Glass, Its Augmented Reality Project | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Larry Page and Sergey Brin have long had the dream of a hands-free, mobile Google, where search was a seamless process as you moved around the world. As the years progressed the vision did, too, expanding beyond search to persistent connections with the people in your lives.

 

In other words, Google’s view of the world now has the social side fully baked into it. Google is now revealing that it is taking concrete steps towards that vision with ProjectGlass, an augmented reality system that will give users the full range of activities performed with a smart phone — without the smart phone. Instead, you wear some sort of geeky prosthetic (one of those pictured is reminiscent of the visor that Geordi La Forge wore on “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” but Google has also been experimenting with a version that piggybacks on regular spectacles.)

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Understanding the phenomenon of Synesthesia

Understanding the phenomenon of Synesthesia | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

http://health.visualinformation.info/understanding-the-phenomenon-of-synesthesia-infographic/

 

Scroll up and down on the right side of the infographics.

 

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[Video] A Quadrotor Swarm Puts on a Seriously Psychedelic Light Show at Cannes

A troupe of 16 quadrotors (flying robots) dance to and manipulate sound and light at the Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors' Showcase 2012.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Pasta-shaped radio waves beamed across Venice

Pasta-shaped radio waves beamed across Venice | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A group of Italian and Swedish researchers may have solved the problem of radio congestion by cleverly twisting radio waves into the shape of fusilli pasta, allowing a potentially infinite number of channels to be broadcast and received.

 

They demonstrated this in real-life conditions by beaming two twisted radio waves across the waters of Venice. As the world continues to adapt in the digital age, the introduction of new mobile smartphones, wireless internet and digital TVs means the number of radio frequency bands available to broadcast information gets smaller and smaller.

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Baby's birth captured in MRI movie for the first time

Baby's birth captured in MRI movie for the first time | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

It's unlikely to be a comfortable place to deliver a baby, but now a video documents the first birth in an MRI machine. Christian Bamberg and a team from Charité University Hospital in Berlin, Germany, announced the world first in December 2010, but the movie has only recently been released.

 

The video captures the active second stage of labour as the mother expels the fetus. The technique, called cinematic MRI, takes repeated images of the same slice of the body before joining them up to create an ultra-detailed video. It was recently turned on unborn twins for the first time to study a common complication where one fetus receives more of the blood supply and becomes much larger than the other.

 

By using MRI, the team was able to examine the relationship between the movement of the fetus and its position as it travels through the birth canal, which should help doctors better manage labour and delivery. In the future, the team also hopes to visualise the first stage of labour using the same technique, possibly using the videos to create virtual-reality computer training.

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Magnetic field targets transplanted iron-loaded stem cells to key areas of damaged heart

Magnetic field targets transplanted iron-loaded stem cells to key areas of damaged heart | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Optimal stem cell therapy delivery to damaged areas of the heart after myocardial infarction has been hampered by inefficient homing of cells to the damaged site. However, using rat models, researchers in France have used a magnet to guide cells loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles to key sites, enhancing the myocardial retention of intravascularly delivered endothelial progenitor cells.

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How Accurate Were Minority Report’s Technology Predictions?

How Accurate Were Minority Report’s Technology Predictions? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Released 10 years ago today, Minority Report served up a captivating and thoroughly convincing look at what the future might hold. But how well has the film's bold vision aged?

 

WIRED magazine took at look at 10 key technologies from the film — which built on concepts dreamed up during an "idea summit" of tech thinkers convened by director Steven Spielberg — to compare the decade-old science fiction to today's reality.

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Protein evolution could generate new semiconducting structures

Protein evolution could generate new semiconducting structures | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The best semiconductors are grown, not made. At least, this might one day be the case. Proteins that can build silica nanostructures on our behalf have been "evolved" in the lab. The structures could find a use in the semiconductor industry. Luke Bawazer, now at the University of Leeds, UK, and his colleagues wondered whether proteins that evolved to help build animal skeletons could be used to grow new electronics components.

 

The team chose silicateins – proteins that build the silica skeletons of marine sponges – as the basis for their work. Using DNA amplification techniques, they grew millions of strands of DNA that code for silicateins. Mutations arise naturally during the process, so the final pool of DNA contained enough variation to ensure that some of the silicateins would build different kinds of mineral structures.

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Dutch Venture company wants to land people on Mars by 2023 - and they won't be coming back

Dutch Venture company wants to land people on Mars by 2023 - and they won't be coming back | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A Dutch company aims to land humans on Mars by 2023 as the first step toward establishing a permanent colony on the Red Planet. Price tag: $6 billion for first 4 people — and they won't be coming back.

 

The project, called Mars One, plans to drop four astronauts on Mars in April 2023. New members of the nascent colony will arrive every two years after that, and none of the Red Planet pioneers will ever return to Earth.

 

To pay for all of this, Mars One says it will stage a media spectacle the likes of which the world has never seen — a sort of interplanetary reality show a la "Big Brother." "This project seems to be the only way to fulfill humanity's dream to explore outer space," theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Gerard 't Hooft, an ambassador for Mars One, said in an introductory video posted on the company'swebsite. "It is going to be an exciting experiment. Let's get started."

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Cancers Genomes and their Implications for Curing Cancer (by Bert Vogelstein, JHU)

The full lecture title is "Cancers - Their Genomes, Microenvironments, and Susceptibility to Bacteria-based Therapies" by Bert Vogelstein. The Johns Hopkins Center for Biotechnology Education and the Department of Biology in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences hosted the American Society for Microbiology's Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE) on the Homewood campus. Bert Vogelstein gave the closing plenary lecture, "Cancers - Their Genomes, Microenvironments, and Susceptibility to Bacteria-based Therapies". He teaches at John Hopkins University.

ASMCUE, now in its 18th year, is a professional development conference for approximately 300 educators. Each year, its steering committee organizes a program that offers access to premier scientists in diverse specialties and to educators leading biology education reform efforts. For more information on the conference, go to http://www.asmcue.org/page02d.shtml

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Algae-Fueled Motorcycle Sets Speed Record

Algae-Fueled Motorcycle Sets Speed Record | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Below the Surface’s “Driving Innovation” Team established the first official algae-fueled motorcycle speed records during The Texas Mile land speed event on March 24th, 2012. Team leader Kristian Gustavson reached 94.6 mph using a 50/50 blend of biodiesel derived from algae and cooking oil waste from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). Fellow team member, Devin Chatterjie, reached 96.2 MPH on 100% algae-derived Green Crude diesel fuel supplied by Sapphire Energy Inc., one of the world’s leaders in algae-based oil crude production. Together, they established the fastest and only known records to date for an algae-fueled motorcycle. The Driving Innovation Team rode a unique turbo-charged, 800cc diesel powered Track Motorcycle manufactured in Holland. The bike was shipped from Holland to the US last fall courtesy of FedEx Express in a show of support for the project.

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New candidate drug stops cancer cells and regenerates nerve cells

New candidate drug stops cancer cells and regenerates nerve cells | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a small-molecule-inhibiting drug that in early laboratory cell tests stopped breast cancer cells from spreading and also promoted the growth of early nerve cells called neurites.

 

The inhibitor overcomes a number of previous scientific challenges by precisely targeting a single component of a cell signaling protein complex called Rho GTPases. This complex regulates cell movement and growth throughout the body. Miscues in Rho GTPase processes are also widely implicated in human diseases, including various cancers and neurologic disorders.

 

Because the role of Rho GTPases in cellular processes and cancer formation is well established, researchers have spent years trying to identify safe and effective therapeutic targets for specific parts of the protein complex. In particular, scientists have focused on the center protein in the complex called RhoA, which is essential for the signaling function of the complex. In breast cancer for example, increased RhoA activity makes the cancer cells more invasive and causes them to spread, while a deficiency of RhoA suppresses cancer growth and progression.

 

Despite this knowledge, past efforts to develop an effective small-molecule inhibitor for RhoA have failed, explained Zheng, who has studied Rho GTPases for over two decades. Most roadblocks stem from a lack of specificity in how researchers have been able to target RhoA, a resulting lack of efficiency in affecting molecular processes, problems with toxicity, and the inability to find a workable drug design.

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‘Mind uploading’ featured in an academic journal special issue for first time

‘Mind uploading’ featured in an academic journal special issue for first time | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The Special Issue on Mind Uploading (Vol. 4, issue 1, June 2012) of the International Journal of Machine Consciousness “constitutes a significant milestone in the history of mind uploading research: the first-ever collection of scientific and philosophical papers on the theme of mind uploading,” as Ben Goertzel and Matthew Ikle’ note in the Introduction to this issue.

 

“Mind uploading” is an informal term that refers to transferring the mental contents from a human brain into a different substrate, such as a digital, analog, or quantum computer. It’s also known as “whole brain emulation” and “substrate-independent minds.”

 

Serious mind uploading researchers have emerged recently, taking this seemingly science-fictional notion seriously and pursuing it via experimental and theoretical research programs, Goertzel and Ilke’ note.

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Stanford researchers develop much faster chargable Edison battery

Stanford researchers develop much faster chargable Edison battery | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A century-old battery originally developed by Thomas Edison to power cars may find new life today with new electrodes developed at Stanford University that allow the battery to be charged and discharged much more rapidly than older versions of the device. The Edison battery, which uses nickel and iron electrodes immersed in an alkaline medium, uses cheap metals that are readily available. Unlike modern lithium-ion batteries, moreover, the Edison battery is unlikely to explode in a crash. But because it takes so long to be charged and releases its power relatively slowly, it has been displaced by lead-acid batteries in conventional automobiles and by lithium-ion batteries in electric cars and most other applications that require regular re-charging.

 

A team headed by chemist Hongjie Dai of Stanford's Precourt Institute for Energy noted that carbon has been used frequently to enhance electrical conductivity in electrodes and decided to try it in an Edison battery. He and his colleagues grew nanocrystals of iron oxide on sheets of graphene (sheets of carbon only one atom thick) for one electrode and nanocrystals of nickel hydroxide  on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, each consisting of about 10 concentric graphene sheets rolled together.

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Map of Europe: 1000 AD to Present Day - all in a short VIDEO clip

Map of Europe: 1000 AD to Present Day - all in a short VIDEO clip | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Map of Europe: 1000 AD to present day....watch the march of history in just a few minutes.


Via Daniel House
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How to reinforce learning while you sleep

How to reinforce learning while you sleep | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Memories can be reactivated during sleep and strengthened in the process,  Northwestern University research suggests.

 

In the Northwestern study, research participants learned how to play two artificially generated musical tunes with well-timed key presses. Then while the participants took a 90-minute nap, the researchers presented one of the tunes that had been practiced, but not the other. By using EEG methods to record the brain’s electrical activity, the researchers ensured that the soft musical cues were presented during slow-wave sleep (deep sleep, not REM sleep, or dreaming), a stage of sleep previously linked to cementing memories. Participants made fewer errors when pressing the keys to produce a melody that had been presented while they slept, compared to the melody not presented.

 

SONGBIRDS LEARN MELODIES DURING SLEEP

 

When zebra finches learn their songs from their father early in life, their brain is active during sleep. The researchers, Sharon Gobes, Thijs Zandbergen and Johan Bolhuis, have demonstrated that the way in which zebra finches learn their songs is very similar to the way in which children learn to speak. In both cases learning takes place during early youth and involves considerable practise. Also, in children and songbirds alike, different brain regions are involved in learning and in speaking or singing. The new research shows that, just as in human infants, the brain of the young zebra finch is also active during sleep. This makes songbirds a good animal model to study the role of sleep in human speech acquisition.

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100616090223.htm

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Harvard Bioscience's "InBreath" Bioreactor Used in World's First Successful Laryngotracheal Transplant

Harvard Bioscience's "InBreath" Bioreactor Used in World's First Successful Laryngotracheal Transplant | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Surgeons in Russia have successfully transplanted a completely synthetic chunk of the larynx. The operation, which has been performed in two patients, is the first step towards creating an entire synthetic voicebox. The transplanted synthetic part, about 5 centimetres long, consists of a section of the windpipe, or trachea, at the top of which is a version of the cricoid arch and plate – a hollow, collar-like segment that forms the base of the larynx.

 

The transplants, which required more than a half-year of preparation, were performed on the first two patients enrolled in an ongoing clinical trial at Krasnodar Regional Hospital. The Russian Ministry of Health has approved a clinical protocol for an unlimited number of patients in this trial, all of which will involve trachea procedures.

 

Each bioreactor was specifically adapted by Harvard Bioscience to the clinical requirements for each patient. Each bioreactor was loaded with a synthetic scaffold in the shape of the patient's original organ. The scaffolds were then seeded with the patient's own stem cells. Over the course of about two days, the bioreactor promoted proper cell seeding and development. Because the patients' own stem cells were used, their bodies have accepted the transplants without the use of immunosuppressive drugs.

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Lights Over Lapland the Aurora Borealis Experience

Lights Over Lapland the Aurora Borealis Experience is a project that I have been working on for the last three years. The video was created using DSLR cameras and a time-lapse technique that required thousands of hours to produce. The opportunity to spend so much time in such an incredible environment capturing this phenomenon has been one of the most amazing experiences of my life.

 

If you would like to experience the magic of the aurora borealis in person please visit lightsoverlapland.com and book your place on one of our aurora expeditions while we still have spaces available.

 

I would like to thank our editor Tom Malkowicz (vimeo.com/channels/thomas) for his contribution and creative assistance. Without his help this film would not have been possible. I would also like to thank my wife Linnea. Her patience, and willingness to allow me to follow my dreams have been the driving force behind this film.

 

All of the images in the film were captured in Abisko National Park, Sweden.


Via Daniel House
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1,1,2,3,5,8...The Golden Ratio

1,1,2,3,5,8...The Golden Ratio | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The Golden Ratio can be illustrated within special dimensions of Sprials, Triangles and Rectangles  where the ratio of the length of the short side to the long side is .618, was noted by ancient Greek architects as the most visually pleasing rectangle and its dimensions were used to construct buildings such as the Parthenon.

 

The Golden Ratio has also been used extensively in classical paintings where it was believed to produce the most visually pleasing figures. The ratio also appears all over nature, such as the number of petals on some flowers, biological forms like the nautilus shell, mollusks, animal antlers, leaves, human proportions, galaxy spirals, and the relations between harmonious tones in music.

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World's helium supply running low

World's helium supply running low | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Helium, an element commonly used in party balloons, has become so scarce that scientists are worried it will be gone within the next 30 years. Researchers are blaming party patrons for squandering the element which cannot be made artificially. Helium, a substance that most party-goers seem to be familiar with, is dwindling in supply at an alarming rate according to scientists and medical professionals. The world's second-lightest element, which is crucial to the usage of equipment such as MRI scanners and neutron beams, is disappearing so fast that experts are warning it could be gone as soon as 2025. Due to a law passed in 1996, helium has become "too cheap to recycle" and the sharply declining stock of the gas could ultimately spell doom for the medical industry says The Independent.
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Highest Temperature Ever Created On Earth: 4 Trillion Degrees Celsius

Highest Temperature Ever Created On Earth: 4 Trillion Degrees Celsius | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Guinness World Records has recognized Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider as the device which has set a new standard for achieving the "Highest Man-Made Temperature": a mind boggingly extreme 4 trillion degrees Celsius -– which is 250,000 times hotter than the center of the Sun.

 

The heavy ion collider achieved this remarkable feat by smashing gold ions together at nearly the speed of light. The collider, which is 2.4 miles long, produced the collision — which resulted in impact energy so intense that the neutrons and protons inside the gold nuclei "melted," releasing fundamental quarks and gluons that then formed a nearly friction-free primordial plasma.

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Astronomers Discover Galaxy They Thought Couldn’t Exist

Astronomers Discover Galaxy They Thought Couldn’t Exist | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Astronomers have spotted one of the rarest and most extreme galaxy clusters in the universe and, behind it, an object that shouldn’t exist. Galaxy clusters are collections of galaxies that orbit one another and are the most massive objects in the universe. The newly discovered cluster, first detected by the Hubble space telescope, is over 500 trillion times the mass of the sun. It is located approximately 10 billion light-years away. Because looking out into the distant cosmos means also looking back in time, the cluster formed during an era when the universe was a quarter its present age.

 

The cluster, named IDCS J1426.5+3508, is extreme because during this period in cosmic history, massive collections of galaxies were just beginning to form. Only one other cluster of comparable size has been seen at this distance and it is a lightweight compared to IDCS J1426.5+3508. Adding to the object’s strangeness, a mysterious arc of blue light was seen just behind the galaxy cluster. Astronomers think this indicates another massive star-forming galaxy located even further away at an even earlier epoch.

 

Light from this more distant — and yet unnamed – galaxy has been highly distorted by an effect known as gravitational lensing. The gargantuan mass of the galaxy cluster bends and twists light coming from the distant galaxy, creating the strange blue arc. The farther galaxy is estimated to be 10 to 13 billion light-years away and have a mass approximately 70 trillion times the sun.

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3M has developed a translucent film that converts windows into solar panels

3M has developed a translucent film that converts windows into solar panels | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

3M said the thin film can easily be applied to windows, generating power and cutting heat, and will begin sales next year.

 

The solar film, on display at the Ceatec electronics conference in Japan, is arrayed in narrow, translucent green strips with clear gaps between and then glued to windows in large patches. A square meter of the film can generate roughly enough electricity to charge an iPhone under peak sunlight, but still allows for high visibility.

 

The product currently generates only about 20 percent of the electricity that a traditional silicon solar panel does, and will cost about half as much, though the final price has not been decided.

 

But it is also far easier to install and takes up no additional space. 3M has strong expertise in adhesives, where its less technical products include Scotch tape and Post-it sticky notes.

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HyperMach SonicStar - first 3.5 Mach supersonic business jet

Since the demise of Concorde in 2003, supersonic flights have been off the mainstream aviation radar, and many believe it’s unlikely that we’ll see a commercial airliner travelling at these speeds again. But the prospects for private aviation look much brighter.Currently in development, the futuristic SonicStar is designed to carry up to 20 people travelling speeds of 2740 mph. This would enable a trip from Paris to New York in less than 2 hours and would make the SonicStar the world’s fastest passenger aircraft.

 

One major reason for suspending Concorde operations in 2003 was its prohibitive operating costs. To fly from London to New York, Concorde used about the same amount of fuel as a fully loaded 747 which could carry four times as many passengers.

Manufacturer HyperMach claims the SonicStar will be 30% more efficient than Concorde. To save weight the hull and wings of the jet will be largely built from super lightweight materials such as composite or titanium.

 

Then there is the SonicStar’s propulsion concept called the S-MAGJET. Unlike current jet engines this is a hybrid system in which a generator unit provides electric energy used by highly efficient propulsion fans. This is a totally new concept in aviation which HyperMach claims would result in 70% more operational efficiency and a significantly reduced carbon footprint compared to other aircraft. In fact, you wouldn’t hear any supersonic boom from the ground.

 

Other manufacturers are working on designs for supersonic jets, including the Aerion Corporation, but the Citation X, G650 and their rivals can rest easy for a few more years. Such ground-breaking technology takes time, so we will probably have to wait another decade or more to see supersonic aircraft in action.

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NTU scientists create environmentally friendly toilet which turns organic waste into electricity

NTU scientists create environmentally friendly toilet which turns organic waste into electricity | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed a new toilet system that converts human waste to electricity and fertiliser. Dubbed the "No-Mix Vacuum Toilet", the system has two chambers which separate liquid and solid wastes. It also reduces the amount of water needed for flushing by up to 90 per cent, compared to current toilet systems in Singapore. The conventional water closet uses about four to six litres of water per flush. With the vacuum suction technology, only 0.2 litres of water is needed to flush liquids, and one litre of water to flush solids. 

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