Amazing Science
Follow
358.6K views | +55 today
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Polymath Online
Scoop.it!

100 Years Of Historical Earthquake Data - Graphical Map

100 Years Of Historical Earthquake Data - Graphical Map | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
This map of all the world's recorded earthquakes between 1898 and 2003 is stunning. As you might expect, it also creates a brilliant outline of the plates of the Earth's crust—especially the infamous "Ring of Fire" around the Pacific Plate.

 

The plate boundaries are amazingly vivid in this geovisualization of the all the earthquakes over  a 105 year span.  How did scientist orginally come up with the theory of plate tectonics?  How did spatial thinking and mapping play a role in that scientific endeavor?


Via Seth Dixon, Martin Daumiller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Medical Innovation Needs Silicon Valley Speed

Medical Innovation Needs Silicon Valley Speed | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The U.S. medical discovery-to-patient process moves at a glacial pace and is in desperate need of an overhaul; lessons learned in Silicon Valley can be applied to eliminate bottlenecks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Funding of scientific projects on Kickstarter using crowdsourcing

Funding of scientific projects on Kickstarter using crowdsourcing | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

It’s a good time to be Kickstarter. The crowdfunding platform has had a blockbuster year, breaking into mainstream consciousness with campaigns that raised millions of dollars, like the Pebble e-paper watch above. The platform has seen almost $275 million pledged to some 63,000 projects to date, with $231 million going towards successful fundings.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Keeping the flu away - synthetic protein outsmarts the influenza virus

Keeping the flu away - synthetic protein outsmarts the influenza virus | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A new discovery from SDSU’s Donald P. Shiley BioScience Center finds that EP67, a powerful synthetic protein, is able to activate the innate immune system within just two hours of being administered.

 

The research showed that by introducing EP67 into the body within 24 hours of exposure to the flu virus caused the immune system to react almost immediately to the threat, well before your body normally would. Because EP67 doesn’t work on the virus but on the immune system itself, it functions the same no matter the flu strain, unlike the influenza vaccine, which must exactly match the currently circulating strain.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Scientists say NASA's 'new arsenic form of life' was untrue

Scientists say NASA's 'new arsenic form of life' was untrue | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Two new scientific papers have disproved a controversial claim made by NASA-funded scientists in 2010 that a new form of bacterial life had been discovered that could thrive on arsenic.

 

"Contrary to an original report, the new research clearly shows that the bacterium, GFAJ-1, cannot substitute arsenic for phosphorus to survive," said a statement by the US journal Science, a prestigious, peer-reviewed magazine.

 

Science published Sunday the much-hyped initial study in December 2010, with lead researcher Felisa Wolfe-Simon, then a fellow in NASA's astrobiology program, announcing that a new form of life had been scooped from a California lake.

 

The bacterium in arsenic-rich Mono Lake was said to redefine the building blocks of life, surviving and growing by swapping phosphorus for arsenic in its DNA and cell membranes. Biologists consider these six elements as necessary for life: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. Arsenic is similar to phosphorus but is typically poisonous to living organisms.

 

The original study needed to be confirmed in order to be considered a true discovery, and two separate teams found that indeed, the bacterium needed some phosphate to survive, and could not fully substitute arsenic to live.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Web3.0 - The Evolving Web: Mapping the World's Data

Web3.0 - The Evolving Web: Mapping the World's Data | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Web 2.0 has been largely about social sharing, collaboration and user-generated content -- contributing to a more detailed web of information. But much of the information presented throughout the Web until recently has tended to be isolated content lacking relevant and dynamic context about how entities -- including people, objects, interests, locations, events or decisions -- are connected.

 

As we move towards Web 3.0 and the Semantic Web -- characterized by related, contextualized and personalized data -- there's a growing push for more robust context and relationship mapping. Several companies, from search engines to social networks, have already begun mapping and graphing the way their customers use, interact with and understand data.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Science in three dimensions: The print revolution - 3D printers are opening up new scientific worlds

Science in three dimensions: The print revolution - 3D printers are opening up new scientific worlds | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Three-dimensional printers are opening up new worlds to research. Research labs use many types of 3D printers to construct everything from fossil replicas to tissues of beating heart cells. Arthur Olson’s team at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, produces models of molecules; some are shown here partway through the printing process.

 

Christoph Zollikofer witnessed the first birth of a Neanderthal in the modern age. In his anthropology lab at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, in 2007, the skull of a baby Homo neanderthalensis emerged from a photocopier-sized machine after a 20-hour noisy but painless delivery of whirring motors and spitting plastic. This modern miracle had endured a lengthy gestation: it took years for Zollikofer's collaborators to find suitable bones from a Neanderthal neonate, analyse them with a computed-tomography (CT) scanner and digitally stitch them together on the computer screen. The labour, however, was simple: Zollikofer just pressed 'print' on his lab's US$50,000 three-dimensional (3D) printer.

 

A pioneer in the use of 3D printing for research, Zollikofer started 20 years ago with a prototype that was even more expensive and required toxic materials and solvents — limitations that put off most scientists. But now newer, cheaper technology is catching on. Just as an inkjet printer sprays ink onto a page line by line, many modern 3D devices spray material — usually plastic — layer by layer onto a surface, building up a shape. Others fuse solid layers out of a vat of liquid or powdered plastic, often using ultraviolet or infrared light. Any complex shape can be printed, sometimes with the help of temporary scaffolding that is later dissolved or chipped away. These days, personal kits go for as little as $500, says Terry Wohlers, a consultant and market analyst based in Fort Collins, Colorado — although industrial systems cost an average of $73,000. Last year, he says, nearly 30,000 printers were sold worldwide, with academic institutions buying one-third of those in the $15,000–30,000 price range.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

World’s First Solar Energy DC Air Conditioning System

World’s First Solar Energy DC Air Conditioning System | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

SplitCool DC18 is the world’s first air conditioning system powered by DC (or direct current) that is generated from solar photovoltaic. Compared to other conventional air conditioning system that regularly uses AC (or alternating current), SplitCool is more efficient. This innovative air conditioning system is powered by solar energy a clean and renewable energy. No CFC or chlorofluorocarbons that deplete our ozone layer is used in the design. Additionally, the product is certified by TUV, known as the world’s strictest quality agency in approving any products.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Weird Science
Scoop.it!

Acid-wielding worms drill through bones at the bottom of the sea

Acid-wielding worms drill through bones at the bottom of the sea | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Tiny 'bone-devouring worms', known to both eat and inhabit dead whale skeletons and other bones on the sea floor, have a unique ability to release bone-melting acid, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego have recently discovered.

 

Dr Sigrid Katz, a postdoctoral researcher working with Greg Rouse and Martin Tresguerres, said: "These worms are unique in using bone as a habitat and nutrient source. We have learned a lot about these worms in the past 10 years, but one of the most intriguing questions has been how they penetrate bone and take up nutrients."

Via Daniel House
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Surprisingly Rapid Changes In Earth’s Core Discovered

Surprisingly Rapid Changes In Earth’s Core Discovered | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The movements in the liquid part of the Earth's core are changing surprisingly quickly, and this affects the Earth's magnetic field, according to new research.

 

The Ørsted satellite’s very precise measurements of the Earth’s magnetic field over the past nine years have made it possible for Nils Olsen, Senior Scientist with DTU Space, and several German scientists, to map surprisingly rapid changes in the movements in the Earth’s core.


“What is so surprising is that rapid, almost sudden, changes take place in the Earth’s magnetic field. This suggests that similar sudden changes take place in the movement of the liquid metal deep inside the Earth which is the reason for the Earth’s magnetic field,” Nils Olsen explains.


The Earth’s core consists of an inner solid core which is surrounded by an outer liquid core approx. 3,000 km below our feet. Both the liquid core and the solid core consist primarily of iron and nickel, and it is the movements in the outer liquid part of the Earth’s core which create the Earth’s magnetic field. Changes in these movements are seen as changes in the magnetic field, and scientists can therefore use satellite measurements of the magnetic field to find out what is going on in the liquid core deep inside the Earth.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from TAL effector science
Scoop.it!

Specific Modifications of the Drosophila Genome by Means of an Easy TALEN Strategy

Specific Modifications of the Drosophila Genome by Means of an Easy TALEN Strategy | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Technology development has always been one of the forces driving breakthroughs in biomedical research. Since the time of Thomas Morgan, Drosophilists have, step by step, developed powerful genetic tools for manipulating and functionally dissecting the Drosophila genome, but room for improving these technologies and developing new techniques is still large, especially today as biologists start to study systematically the functional genomics of different model organisms, including humans, in a high-throughput manner. Here, we report, for the first time in Drosophila, a rapid, easy, and highly specific method for modifying the Drosophila genome at a very high efficiency by means of an improved transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) strategy. We took advantage of the very recently developed “unit assembly” strategy to assemble two pairs of specific TALENs designed to modify the yellow gene (on the sex chromosome) and a novel autosomal gene. The mRNAs of TALENs were subsequently injected into Drosophila embryos. From 31.2% of the injected F0 fertile flies, we detected inheritable modification involving the yellow gene. The entire process from construction of specific TALENs to detection of inheritable modifications can be accomplished within one month. The potential applications of this TALEN-mediated genome modification method in Drosophila are discussed.


Via dromius
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Unprecedented subatomic details down to picometer precision of exotic ferroelectric nanomaterials

Unprecedented subatomic details down to picometer precision of exotic ferroelectric nanomaterials | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Brookhaven scientists used a technique called electron holography to capture images of the electric fields created by the materials’ atomic displacement with picometer precision — that’s the trillionths-of-a-meter scale crucial to understanding these promising nanoparticles. By applying different levels of electricity and adjusting the temperature of the samples, researchers demonstrated a method for identifying and describing the behavior and stability of ferroelectrics at the smallest-ever scale, with major implications for data storage.

 

"This kind of detail is just amazing — for the first time ever we can actually see the positions of atoms and link them to local ferroelectricity in nanoparticles,” said Brookhaven physicist Yimei Zhu. “This kind of fundamental insight is not only a technical milestone, but it also opens up new engineering possibilities.”

 

Direct polarization images of individual ferroelectric nano cubes captured with electron holography. The fringing field, or “footprint” of electric polarization, can be seen clearly in (a), but it vanishes when the material is subjected to high temperatures (b). The lower images show that no fringing field can be observed before application of electricity (c), but a clear field emanates after current is applied (d).


Ferroelectrics are perhaps best understood as the mysterious cousins of more familiar ferromagnetic materials, commonly seen in everything from refrigerator magnets to computer hard drives. As the name suggests, ferromagnetics have intrinsic magnetic dipole moments, meaning that they are always oriented toward either “north” or “south.” These dipole moments tend to align themselves on larger scales, giving rise to the magnetization responsible for attraction and repulsion. Applying an external magnetic field can actually flip that magnetization, allowing programmers and engineers to manipulate the material.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Novel Nanotherapeutic Developed that Delivers Clot-Busting Drugs Directly to Obstructed Blood Vessels

Novel Nanotherapeutic Developed that Delivers Clot-Busting Drugs Directly to Obstructed Blood Vessels | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a novel biomimetic strategy that delivers life-saving nanotherapeutics directly to obstructed blood vessels, dissolving blood clots before they cause serious damage or even death. This new approach enables thrombus dissolution while using only a fraction of the drug dose normally required, thereby minimizing bleeding side effects that currently limit widespread use of clot-busting drugs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Automate or Perish - Successful Businesses will need an optimized mix of humans, robots and algorithms

Automate or Perish  - Successful Businesses will need an optimized mix of humans, robots and algorithms | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

In Automate This, a book due out next month, author and entrepreneur Christopher Steiner tells the story of stockbroker Thomas Peterffy, the creator of the first automated Wall Street trading system. Using a computer to execute trades, without humans entering them manually on a keyboard, was controversial in 1987—so controversial that Nasdaq pressured him to unplug from its network. Then, with a wink, Peterffy built an automated machine that could tap out the trades on a traditional keyboard—technically obeying Nasdaq rules. Peterffy made $25 million in 1987 and is now a billionaire.

 

Today, automated trading bots account for nearly three-quarters of U.S. equity trading by volume. Trading houses plow millions into fiber optics and microwave dishes so their algorithms can send trades a millisecond faster than the next guys'. And although the first trading robot was built 25 years ago, most of the change on Wall Street has occurred during just the last few years. When it comes to automation, we may be in the elbow of an exponential curve.

 

In March 2012, Amazon paid $775 million for Kiva Systems, a company that makes robotic dollies that zip across warehouse floors carrying shelves full of goods. Kiva found it was more productive to have the humans who "pick, pack, and stow" items stay in one place and let intelligent shelves come to them. Among other reasons, Amazon said, it bought the robotics firm because the technology offered the chance to reduce labor requirements at its dozens of warehouses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Students Develop Gloves That Translate Sign Language Into Speech

Students Develop Gloves That Translate Sign Language Into Speech | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

There are currently about 40 million deaf, mute and deaf-mute people and many of them use sign language to communicate, but there are very few people who actually understand sign language. Using gloves fitted with flex sensors, touch sensors, gyroscopes and accelerometers (as well as some solar cells to increase battery life) the EnableTalk team has built a system that can translate sign language into text and then into spoken words using a text-to-speech engine. The whole system then connects to a smartphone over Bluetooth.

 

The team has built a number of prototypes and tested them with sign language-users in the Ukraine. The idea for the project, said team member Osika Maxim, came from interacting with hearing-impaired athletes at the groups’ school.

 

The few existing projects that come close to what EnableTalk is proposing generally cost around $1,200 and usually have fewer sensors, use wired connections and don’t come with an integrated software solution. EnableTalk, on the other hand, says that the hardware for its prototypes costs somewhere around $75 per device.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Weird Science
Scoop.it!

Magnetic Tornadoes Rage on the Sun

Magnetic Tornadoes Rage on the Sun | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The discovery of "super-tornadoes" rising above the surface of the sun may help solve the mystery of how our home star heats it wispy outer atmosphere to a million degrees. There is plenty of energy below the 5780° visible surface to do the job, but solar physicists have long argued about how that energy heats the corona, seen as an encircling crown of light that emerges during a total solar eclipse. Now a group reports online today in Nature that, using both spaceborne and ground-based telescopes, it has detected 1500-kilometer-wide swirls of solar atmosphere rising from the surface into the corona. Each lasts 10 to 15 minutes, and there are about 11,000 of them on the sun at a time. Computer simulations (picture) show how similar-looking the twisting magnetic field lines of a solar tornado are to real tornadoes. Now solar physicists must figure out how much energy super-tornadoes deliver compared with other proposed energy sources.


Via Daniel House
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

U.S. experiences warmest 12-month period on record

U.S. experiences warmest 12-month period on record | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Weather Underground provides local & long range Weather Forecast, weather reports, maps & tropical weather conditions for locations worldwide. Thanks in part to the historic heat wave that demolished thousands of high temperature records at the end of June, temperatures in the contiguous U.S. were the warmest on record over the past twelve months and for the year-to-date period of January - June, said NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) on Monday. June 2012 was the 14th warmest June on record, so was not as extreme overall as March 2012 (first warmest March on record), April (third warmest April), or May (second warmest May.) However, temperatures were warm enough in June to set a new U.S. record for hottest 12-month period for the third straight month, narrowly eclipsing the record set just the previous month. The past thirteen months have featured America's 2nd warmest summer (in 2011), 4th warmest winter, and warmest spring on record. Twenty-six states were record warm for the 12-month period, and an additional sixteen states were top-ten warm. The year-to-date period of January - June was the warmest on record by an unusually large margin--1.2°F.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Scientists twist light to send data at new speed record - 2.56 terabits per second

Scientists twist light to send data at new speed record - 2.56 terabits per second | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A multi-national team led by USC with researchers hailing from the U.S., China, Pakistan and Israel has developed a system of transmitting data using twisted beams of light at ultra-high speeds – up to 2.56 terabits per second. To put that in perspective, broadband cable (which you probably used to download this) supports up to about 30 megabits per second. The twisted-light system transmits more than 85,000 times more data per second.


Their work might be used to build high-speed satellite communication links, short free-space terrestrial links, or potentially be adapted for use in the fiber optic cables that are used by some Internet service providers.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Brazilian researchers develop new anti-inflammatory for severe pain

Brazilian researchers develop new anti-inflammatory for severe pain | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Butantan Institute in São Paulo, Brazil, have developed a powerful new anti-inflammatory to relieve hard-to-control pain. Initial tests have confirmed the efficacy of the medication, which is based on a protein found in the blood.

 

The main breakthrough of the research is the successful synthesizing of a protein produced by the human body, the calcium binding S100A9. Under certain conditions, this protein is used by our bodies to keep pain under control. To make the medication, the scientists discovered that only a small part of the protein is required, which leads to reduced production costs.

 

According to researcher Renata Giorgi, the discovery represents an important step forward in relation to drugs available in Brazil. In particular the new drug offers two important advantages: it is more powerful and it can be administered orally.


Via Ray and Terry's
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Aspen Ideas Festival 2012: Innovations - Marissa Mayer, Jerry Murdock, Tim O'Reilly and others...

Aspen Ideas Festival 2012: Innovations - Marissa Mayer, Jerry Murdock, Tim O'Reilly  and others... | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Eric Feng, Dave Morin, Marissa Mayer, Jerry Murdock, Tim O'Reilly explore the question at the Aspen Ideas Festival 2012.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from 3d Print
Scoop.it!

3D Printshow will make body scans of attendees

3D Printshow will make body scans of attendees | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
A 3D printing show in London later this year will offer visitors the chance to have their complete body scanned and printed.

Via 3d Print
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Singularity Scoops
Scoop.it!

How we’re playing God now

How we’re playing God now | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The accelerating pace of technological change is leading to the creation of entirely new opportunities for humans to “play God” — to create and transform life in a way that has never been possible. What was once thought to be the exclusive realm of a higher power is now within the grasp of human beings.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Frederic Emam-Zade Gerardino
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from 3d Print
Scoop.it!

Objet Ltd sets 100-material 3D printing record

Objet Ltd sets 100-material 3D printing record | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
A new, significant milestone has been reached in the world of 3D printing. Objet, French for “Object,” of course, entered into a 3D printing merger with Stratasys earlier this year. That has boosted the company’s ability to rapidly expand its research and development to the point where, recently, it announced that it now has the technology to use 107 different materials in 3D printing applications. Most low-level commercial 3D printers only focus on one kind of plastic or similar substance.

 

But for industrial-grade purposes, there needs to be a lot more flexibility. Objet allows printing of flexible and rigid materials, opaque and transparent, and all manner of colors and shades. “Objet has become the first 3D printing company to break the 100 materials barrier. Considering that we had half this number just a few short years ago, this growth in material choice confirms our commitment to consistently deliver new and enhanced material properties to our customer,” the company said in a statement.


Via 3d Print
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Large wing pattern variety seen in Drosophila fruit fly - similar to butterflies

Large wing pattern variety seen in Drosophila fruit fly - similar to butterflies | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Like butterflies, different species of fruit flies decorate their wings with a great diversity of spots and patterns. Digging deep into a single gene that produce pigmentation in the flies, a group led by UW-Madison biologist Sean Carroll has found the molecular switches that control where the pigmentation is deployed. The finding explains how common genes can be controlled to produce the seemingly endless array of patterns, decoration and body architecture found in animals. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Needle-free jet injection with real-time controlled linear Lorentz-force actuators for painless drug deposit

Needle-free jet injection with real-time controlled linear Lorentz-force actuators for painless drug deposit | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Recently, MIT has developed a prototype device that is able to inject medicine into the body without the passage of a needle. The device will literally shoot the medication past the skin, depositing it into the underlying tissue.

 

Now the question: does it hurt? Remarkably, not at all! Because the nozzle size of the apparatus is extremely narrow - as wide as a mosquito's proboscis - the injection process is nearly undetectable to one's senses (in theory). No more dreaded visits to the doctor's office!

 

In designing this jet-injection mechanism, the engineers relied on what's known as a Lorentz force actuator. The Lorentz force actuator in this case is a small permanent magnet surrounded by a coil of wires. The coil of wires, or solenoid, is part of a piston system that is separate from the permanent magnet which lies in the center. If we recall from high school physics, we know that when a current is passed through the wires of a solenoid, the solenoid becomes an electromagnet which, in turn, creates its own magnetic field. Now, if this new field is opposite that of the permanent magnet, meaning if their fields repel, then a repulsive force will be established. This force will accelerate the piston towards the nozzle, creating a sudden change in pressure which then ejects the medicine out of the nozzle.

 

http://tinyurl.com/ayo4lvo

more...
No comment yet.