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Stunning Infrared Photographs

Stunning Infrared Photographs | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

We're no strangers to infrared photography, yet the visual results of the technology never cease to amaze us. Photographer Oleg Stelmach, aka Elektraua, tackles the art of using infrared film to transform viridescent landscapes into mesmerizing expanses of white, icy foliage. His location of choice is the newly reopened part of Kiev called "Andrew's Descent." The urban setting with a healthy dose of towering trees and plant life is given a brand new, wintery look, boasting ivory leaves against a sapphire sky.

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Amazing Photos of Human Eyes

Amazing Photos of Human Eyes | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Incredible photo series by Suren Manvelyan features extremely detailed close-ups of human eyes.

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The Colorful World of Chemical Crystals

The Colorful World of Chemical Crystals | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A compilation of illustrated articles by Brian Johnston hosted on Micscape.

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Earth Pictures: Iconic Images of Earth from Space

Earth Pictures: Iconic Images of Earth from Space | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Amazing views from 1947 to 2012, including several firsts.
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Sound, water and science! Artist makes a splash with his amazing portfolio of liquid droplets

Sound, water and science! Artist makes a splash with his amazing portfolio of liquid droplets | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
They could almost be mistaken for images taken in the far-reaches of outer space, or an ultra-magnified snapshot of microscopic organisms.
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Translucent Animal Photos from National Geographic

Translucent Animal Photos from National Geographic | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
See photos of see-through creatures and download free desktop wallpapers from National Geographic.
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Mind Blowing Macro Insect Photography by Thomas Shahan

Mind Blowing Macro Insect Photography by Thomas Shahan | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Thomas Shahan is one of the most popular macro insect photographers on Flickr. His 250+ gallery has garnered hundreds of thousands of views and he has brought a level of detail and beauty to these insects that is truly astounding. Hailing from Oklahoma, USA, Thomas uses photography as a tool to raise awareness and educate others about arthropods, which he is so deeply passionate about.

 

Many wonder how Thomas is able to achieve such clarity and detail in his shots. Often it is a ton of patience and trial and error. If he has a still subject, he will also use a technique known as ‘focus stacking’ which allows him to combine several captures (focused on different parts of the insect) into one image so every detail is sharp and crisp (e.g., the eyes, mouth and antennae). For a great summary of Thomas’s photography, there’s a fantastic video interview at the bottom of this post that really delves into his process and thoughts behind his work.

 

As for equipment, Thomas uses a Pentax K200D with either a vintage 28mm or 50mm prime reversed to the end of extension tubes. If he happens upon a highly cooperative subject, he may use his macro bellows for some really high magnification shots.

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Snowflakes Up Close - A Small, Fragile World

Snowflakes Up Close - A Small, Fragile World | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

If you’re one of those people who likes to ponder things while looking out a frosty window on a cold winter day, these pictures will clear up one of those long standing wonders: each snowflake really IS unique. Some look like roman columns, others circuit boards or spaceships. Taken under high magnification using a microscope, these images bring a fragile and beautiful world into view.

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The sun in hydrogen alpha light - photographed from the backyard

The sun in hydrogen alpha light - photographed from the backyard | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Alan Friedman was out capturing this super image of a super Sun from his back yard in Buffalo, NY! 

 

Read more: http://alanfriedman.tumblr.com/


Via Leopoldo Benacchio
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Everyday Objects Under Electron Microscope

Everyday Objects Under Electron Microscope | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
You come into contact with millions of different objects every day.

 

Many videos on scanning and transmission electron microscopy and how to prepare the samples: http://tinyurl.com/chvml2h


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Researchers capture first-ever image of atoms forming a molecule

Researchers capture first-ever image of atoms forming a molecule | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Ohio State University and Kansas State University have captured the first-ever images of atoms moving in a molecule. Shown here is molecular nitrogen. The researchers used an ultrafast laser to knock one electron from the molecule, and recorded the diffraction pattern that was created when the electron scattered off the molecule. The image highlights any changes the molecule went through during the time between laser pulses: one quadrillionth of a second. The constituent atoms' movement is shown as a measure of increasing angular momentum, on a scale from dark blue to pink, with pink showing the region of greatest momentum.

http://tinyurl.com/84xkrc3

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Ramesh Raskar: Imaging at a trillion frames per second, so detailed it shows light itself in motion.

Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography, a new type of imaging so fast it visualizes the world one trillion frames per second, so detailed it shows light itself in motion. This technology may someday be used to build cameras that can look "around" corners or see inside the body without X-rays.
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APOD: 2012 June 17 - Jupiter eclipsing the sun and its rings revealed by reflection

APOD: 2012 June 17 - Jupiter eclipsing the sun and its rings revealed by reflection | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Pictured above is an eclipse of the Sun by Jupiter, as viewed from Galileo. Small dust particles high in Jupiter's atmosphere, as well as the dust particles that compose the rings, can be seen by reflected sunlight.

 

Jupiter's rings were discovered in 1979 by the passing Voyager 1 spacecraft, but their origin was a mystery. Data from the Galileo spacecraft that orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003 later confirmed that these rings were created by meteoroid impacts on small nearby moons. As a small meteoroid strikes tiny Adrastea, for example, it will bore into the moon, vaporize, and explode dirt and dust off into a Jovian orbit.

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Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition

Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition lets us see beyond the capabilities of our unaided eyes. Almost 2000 entries from 70 countries vied for recognition in the 37th annual contest, which celebrates photography through a microscope.
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The Most Beautiful Photographs You'll See All Night

The Most Beautiful Photographs You'll See All Night | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

At first glance these pictures look like something that greets you at the end of a kaleidoscope. But these marvels are the product of up to 15 hours of shooting the stars in the Australia outback.

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Gigapixel camera made out of 98 fully synchonized tiny cameras

Gigapixel camera made out of 98 fully synchonized tiny cameras | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

By synchronizing 98 tiny cameras in a single device, electrical engineers from Duke University and the University of Arizona have developed a prototype camera that can create images with unprecedented detail.

 

The camera's resolution is five times better than 20/20 human vision over a 120 degree horizontal field. The new camera has the potential to capture up to 50 gigapixels of data, which is 50,000 megapixels. By comparison, most consumer cameras are capable of taking photographs with sizes ranging from 8 to 40 megapixels. Pixels are individual "dots" of data -- the higher the number of pixels, the better resolution of the image.

 

The researchers believe that within five years, as the electronic components of the cameras become miniaturized and more efficient, the next generation of gigapixel cameras should be available to the general public.

 

 

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Art of science: extremely small, incredibly close

Art of science: extremely small, incredibly close | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

These photographs from the Wellcome Image Awards 2012, record a beauty usually hidden to the human eye.

 

The chosen images from the Wellcome Image Award 2011 can be viewed here: http://www.wellcomeimageawards.org/#


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Incredible Examples of Electron Microscope Photography

Incredible Examples of Electron Microscope Photography | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Photographs by OLIVER MECKES - Electron microscopes help bring nanoscience to life, providing a level of detail to scientists that was simply not possible before.

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Science at the International Space Station: Spheres, Lenses and Vortices

NASA Astronaut Don Pettit takes advantage of the weightless environment aboard the ISS to do diffusion and lens experiments with pure water. Distributed as part of a collaboration between NASA and the American Physical Society.

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New Electron Microscope Enables to Observe 3D Image in "Real Time"

New Electron Microscope Enables to Observe 3D Image in "Real Time" | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A Japanese research group developed a scanning electron microscope (SEM) capable of showing a 3D image in real time and a high-resolution naked-eye 3D monitor for the SEM. The group consists of researchers from Hitachi High-Technologies Corp, Eizo Nanao Corp, Niigata University, Shizuoka University, etc. The new SEM is expected to be used not only for analyzing the structure of an object but for microanatomy using a manipulator and measuring electrical characteristics of inorganic materials.

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Amazing Microscopic Insect Photography by Steve Gschmeissner

Amazing Microscopic Insect Photography by Steve Gschmeissner | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Steve Gschmeissner is a 61 year old Scientific Photographer from Bedford. He uses a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to magnify his favourite specimens by up to a million times. The results show incredibly detailed images of insects that look like they’re from the latest Alien Invasion movie.


Via Anne Osterrieder
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Franky Nero Oshea's comment, April 19, 2013 8:17 AM
wow, nice photo shot here. please Check out the unn site by clicking http://unn.edu.ng for all your academic needs.
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“Images from Science” exhibition on display for the first time in Russia

“Images from Science” exhibition on display for the first time in Russia | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Whether with bundled crystal fibres, bacteria with a sense of direction or even a web of dark matter, the Max Planck Society’s “Images from Science” exhibition provides extraordinary, fascinating insights into the world of science.

 

The pictures can be viewed online here:

 

http://www.bilder.mpg.de/bildergalerie/index.html?style=

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Visualization of DNA synthesis in vivo

Visualization of DNA synthesis in vivo | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
To visualize the synthesis of biomolecules in living organisms, artificial small molecules can be added to and incorporated by the cell's own biosynthetic machinery. Subsequently, the modified biomolecules containing the artificial units can be selectively labelled with fluorescent substances. Until now, this approach had one major limitation: the substances used for labelling were toxic and caused cell death.

 

Anne Neef, a PhD student from the Institute of Organic Chemistry at the University of Zurich, has developed a new substance that can replace the natural nucleoside thymidine in DNA biosynthesis. This fluorinated nucleoside called "F-ara-Edu" labels DNA with little or no impact on genome function in living cells and even whole animals. "F-ara-Edu" is less toxic than previously reported compounds used for DNA labelling and it can be detected with greater sensitivity.

http://tinyurl.com/btwvlh3

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