Amazing things - ...
Follow
Find
263 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Mad Scientist from Amazing Science
onto Amazing things - sometimes science related
Scoop.it!

Camouflaged Octopus Uses Thousands Of Tiny Chromatophores and Reflectors To Match Surroundings

Camouflaged Octopus Uses Thousands Of Tiny Chromatophores and Reflectors To Match Surroundings | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Roger Hanlon was following this octopus underwater and couldn't believe his eyes.

 

The ghost octopus can match the color and texture of its surroundings in fractions of a second by changing the size and shape of dynamic spots of pigments on their skin called chromatophores.

Chromatophores allow an octopus to blend in with all manner of underwater backdrops.

 

Some combination of these expandable chromatophores and reflectors underneath them allows an octopus to blend in with vegetation, rocks, or smooth surfaces almost imperceptibly. Hanlon has been studying these animals for years, and is still in awe of their camouflaging stunts. “The amazing thing is that these animals are color blind yet they are capable of creating color-match patterns,” Hanlon told Science Friday, “But we don’t know how.”

 

So, when science can’t tell us how something works, all we can do is be amazed. Watch the video again and revel in how awesome this tricky octopus is. It won’t get any more obvious, we promise. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Mad Scientist's insight:

This video shows the amazing the camoflague ability of the octopus. Squid and Cuttlefish (relatives of octopus) are also really good at this. What is even more amazing is that these animals are colour-blind and that their skin cells do all the work.

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Unseen World on Twitter

Unseen World on Twitter | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Staphylococcus bacteria in trachea pic.twitter.com/vyJFMNwx9r
Mad Scientist's insight:

Just beautiful. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Fist bumps, high-fives spread fewer germs than handshakes, study says - Los Angeles Times

Fist bumps, high-fives spread fewer germs than handshakes, study says - Los Angeles Times | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Fox News
Fist bumps, high-fives spread fewer germs than handshakes, study says
Los Angeles Times
This image shows powder transferred during a handshake, to demonstrate that the custom is far less hygienic than the modern fist bump.
Mad Scientist's insight:

This is interesting as we could think about hygiene affecting our culture. Do we spread more microbes with a hug, or a kiss?  Another thing to think about is the spread of disease-associated microbes and those from our normal flora. We can be more sharing than we think.  Fistbump your GP next time you visit?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

New plastics created 'by accident'

New plastics created 'by accident' | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Mad Scientist's insight:

It is a well known fact that most discoveries are not welcomed with a cry of "Eureka" but more like "WTF" (I'll let you translate those 3 letters).  A simple accident leaving 1 component out of a reaction resulted in the discovery of a new type of plastic. The sign of a true scientist is that Dr. Garcia did not just swear and throw the flask away but smashed it to get at the plastic then analyse it. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Weaving software into core memory by hand - YouTube

The software of the Apollo guidance computer was hand woven into rope core memory.
Mad Scientist's insight:

I saw this years ago and loved it. Computer software for the moon missions was woven. All computer code comes back to 0 and 1 (an on or off thing) and the wire was weaved either through a ring or around it.  Knitting patterns are also a form of code and have been used to help teach computer programming.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Spider invasion prompts Mazda fix

Spider invasion prompts Mazda fix | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it

Petrol-sniffing spiders have forced Mazda to issue a voluntary recall notice

Mad Scientist's insight:

This is the Yellow sac spider. It is attracted to the smell of petrol, but by weaving its web in engines it can cause a blockage and build up of pressure. 

If you leave your car parked outside you will find other spiders that love to live in headlights and side mirrors. Luckily we dont have the petrol sniffing one here in NZ.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Scientists dig up giant virus more than 30000 years old in Siberia - CNN

Scientists dig up giant virus more than 30000 years old in Siberia - CNN | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
CNN Scientists dig up giant virus more than 30000 years old in Siberia CNN While this ancient virus is harmless to people, the scientists behind the discovery warn that the discovery suggests that the thawing of permafrost in polar regions, as a...
Mad Scientist's insight:

This is a BIG virus in terms of size but it only infects amoeba. However, it does show that virus can survive extreme conditions for a long time. Sounds like another sci-fi movie in the making...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Scientists find ancient plague DNA in teeth - World - NZ Herald News

Scientists find ancient plague DNA in teeth - World - NZ Herald News | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Scientists say two of the deadliest pandemics in history were caused by strains of the same plague and warn that new versions of the bacteria could spark future outbreaks. - New Zealand Herald
Mad Scientist's insight:

Yersina pestis - is the organism most known for the plague but not much was known about whether other plagues were caused by the same bacteria. Plague is still around - however, our hygeine and public health inititives keep it at bay...for now. We all know that strains can mutate. A pathogen can come from any benign bacterium. Thats evolution.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks

Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking news reports since 2008 to produce an interactive map that plots global outbreaks of diseases that are easily prevented by inexpensive and effective vaccines.
Mad Scientist's insight:

All of these diseases are preventable with vaccination. It is a shame that many people have to suffer because of false science of the past. It takes years for the affects to show.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Stunning Sculptures of Deadly Viruses and Bacteria - The Weather Channel

Stunning Sculptures of Deadly Viruses and Bacteria - The Weather Channel | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Stunning Sculptures of Deadly Viruses and Bacteria
The Weather Channel
U.K. artist Luke Jerram created a series of beautiful glass sculptures on a rather unusual topic — the world's deadliest viruses and bacteria.
Mad Scientist's insight:

A little less cuddly than my crocheted viruses but very beautiful.  It is amazing the detail that protein bits can create.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mad Scientist from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Camouflaged Octopus Uses Thousands Of Tiny Chromatophores and Reflectors To Match Surroundings

Camouflaged Octopus Uses Thousands Of Tiny Chromatophores and Reflectors To Match Surroundings | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Roger Hanlon was following this octopus underwater and couldn't believe his eyes.

 

The ghost octopus can match the color and texture of its surroundings in fractions of a second by changing the size and shape of dynamic spots of pigments on their skin called chromatophores.

Chromatophores allow an octopus to blend in with all manner of underwater backdrops.

 

Some combination of these expandable chromatophores and reflectors underneath them allows an octopus to blend in with vegetation, rocks, or smooth surfaces almost imperceptibly. Hanlon has been studying these animals for years, and is still in awe of their camouflaging stunts. “The amazing thing is that these animals are color blind yet they are capable of creating color-match patterns,” Hanlon told Science Friday, “But we don’t know how.”

 

So, when science can’t tell us how something works, all we can do is be amazed. Watch the video again and revel in how awesome this tricky octopus is. It won’t get any more obvious, we promise. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Mad Scientist's insight:

This video shows the amazing the camoflague ability of the octopus. Squid and Cuttlefish (relatives of octopus) are also really good at this. What is even more amazing is that these animals are colour-blind and that their skin cells do all the work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Consumer Confusion Reigns: Fat's Role in Healthy Eating Habits - Huffington Post

Consumer Confusion Reigns: Fat's Role in Healthy Eating Habits - Huffington Post | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Consumer Confusion Reigns: Fat's Role in Healthy Eating Habits
Huffington Post
I started my career as a registered dietitian in the late 1980s.
Mad Scientist's insight:

Interesting as we study fats and oils this week. We are by now 'conditioned' to be looking at low-fat options, but we should be looking for "good fats" instead. We do need fats and oils in our diet and some fats and oils aid in the breakdown of the less than healthy ones. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

ScienceShot: The Secret of the Frozen Frogs | Science/AAAS | News

ScienceShot: The Secret of the Frozen Frogs | Science/AAAS | News | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it

To call wood frogs hardy would be an understatement. The species (Rana sylvatica) can survive winter temperatures that freeze up to two-thirds of the water in their bodies. They endure this annual popsicle phase with help from cryoprotectants, substances circulating in their blood that lower the freezing point of their body fluids.

Mad Scientist's insight:

These frogs completely freeze over winter then thaw out in spring. They stockpile glycogen in their livers which then swell. The liver then converts the glycogen to glucose when the temperture drops which protects its cells against freezing. Another chemical urea is also accumulated. There is a third substance which they are still working on.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Surprise virus caused blue chicken eggs - Futurity: Research News

Surprise virus caused blue chicken eggs - Futurity: Research News | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Surprise virus caused blue chicken eggs Futurity: Research News "This is an important discovery because some of these rarer native breeds of chicken with this unusual egg color and high quality have become low in number and are in danger of...
Mad Scientist's insight:

This is one of those viruses that can hide in a host's DNA then get stuck. The retrovirus here causes the eggs of this chicken to come out blue. The problem for breeders is that eventually this bit of stuck DNA may disappear on its own.  By the way, these eggs dont hatch into blue chickens.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Fuck Yeah Electron Microscope

Fuck Yeah Electron Microscope | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
FUCK YEAH ELECTRON MICROSCOPES BRINGS YOU WONDERFUL IMAGES OF THE NATURAL AND MATERIAL WORLD THAT...
Mad Scientist's insight:

Pardon the french in the title- but wow!   I have seen electron microscope images before, and even used one in my past life, but some of these are amazing. Look at the pores in a chicken's egg or what salt and pepper really look like. Cool!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Organic Cat Litter Chief Suspect In Nuclear Waste Accident

Organic Cat Litter Chief Suspect In Nuclear Waste Accident | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
The release of plutonium at a New Mexico nuclear dump may have been caused by a bad purchase at the pet shop.
Mad Scientist's insight:

Normal kitty litter is great for soaking up radioactive waste and doesnt react with the environment. However, it appears that organic kitty litter will react with the waste and causes it to burn!  Not a good thing for a drum of radioactive waste to burst. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

How Octopuses Don't Get Tangled Up | I Fucking Love Science

How Octopuses Don't Get Tangled Up | I Fucking Love Science | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
  With hundreds of suckers on each of their eight gangly arms, it’s a wonder how octopuses don’t tie themselves up in knots all the time. A new study reveals how they manage this feat: Chemicals produced by their skin temporarily prevents their suckers from sucking.   
Mad Scientist's insight:

Funny how you dont think of the question until someone answers it. I love octopi - they are such amazing and intelligent creatures

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Knitting as ritual – with potential health benefits?

Knitting as ritual – with potential health benefits? | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Mad Scientist's insight:

I love wool. I have knitted and crocheted for years.  It can get frustrating at times with a new pattern but on the whole, it is very relaxing. I have also taken up spinning and weaving which are even more frustrating at times and relaxing. It is not often that your method of relaxing can be so productive. Start with a scarf then hat and the next thing you know, you are knitting baby clothes for your friends.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Science close up - Wellcome Images 2014

Science close up - Wellcome Images 2014 | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Mad Scientist's insight:

Fantastic pictures from Science photography. Take a look but be prepared to cringe as you go "Wow"

 

There are more images here: http://wellcomeimages.org/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

TV doctor infests himself with worms

TV doctor infests himself with worms | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
BBC TV presenter Dr Michael Mosley has infected himself with a series of parasites in an effort to understand how they affect the human body.
Mad Scientist's insight:

This is pretty extreme. I do not think I could delibrately infect myself with a worm. Good pictures of what they look inside. Remember that tapeworms are cestodes with segmented bodies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Windy cows cause Germany blast

Windy cows cause Germany blast | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
The methane gas released by windy dairy cows causes an explosion in a cow shed in central Germany, police say.
Mad Scientist's insight:

Ok - we all know that cows produce methane, or rather their stomach flora (bacteria and fungi) digest what the cows cannot, and produce methane as a result. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Ozy's record jar-opening skills

Ozy's record jar-opening skills | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Wellington octopus Ozy has been wowing them with jar opening skills.
Mad Scientist's insight:

A record breaker because it can open the jar in under 60 seconds. I have also heard of one who kept a hold of a rolex for years until convinced to give it up by replacing it with a replica. Amazing creatures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

The heat-seeking snake that locks on to headlamps

The heat-seeking snake that locks on to headlamps | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
It's easy to campaign to save endangered species like pandas and woolly spider monkeys because they're fluffy and cute - it's much harder to stick up for venomous snakes.
Mad Scientist's insight:

Lovely to see these snakes are being saved rather than being killed. Rather frightening to think that the bushmaster can jump several metres towards a heat source - and attacked an oncoming motorbike headlight...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mad Scientist from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

X-ray videos of people doing ordinary and extraordinary things

Video footage of X-ray images offer a perspective on bodily movement we simply can't find in static images.

Via F. Thunus
Mad Scientist's insight:

This is quite amazing. Watch how adults and babies drink (compared to the dog) and speak. You can see how the bones and other structures of the body work. The violin playing is quite spooky to see the finger bones move.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Perfect Grilled Cheese Formula Devised By The Royal Society Of Chemistry - Huffington Post

Perfect Grilled Cheese Formula Devised By The Royal Society Of Chemistry - Huffington Post | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Perfect Grilled Cheese Formula Devised By The Royal Society Of Chemistry Huffington Post Scientists at the U.K.'s Royal Society of Chemistry recently teamed up with the British Cheese Board on a delicious assignment: devising a formula for the...
Mad Scientist's insight:

Cooking is all about chemistry even if it is about a toasted cheese sandwich (which is what Americans call a Gilled Cheese sandwich). Although they talk about the 'perfect" sandwhich, perhaps each of us would see that perfection differently. Do you like lots of cheese or little. Cooking the cheese too much will change flavour and different people like different flavours.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mad Scientist
Scoop.it!

Uncorking the muse: Alcohol intoxication facilitates creative problem solving

Uncorking the muse: Alcohol intoxication facilitates creative problem solving | Amazing things - sometimes science related | Scoop.it
Alcohol intoxication facilitates creative problem solving. Worldview = affirmed. http://t.co/BJsHALkaHm
Mad Scientist's insight:

Testing here showed that intoxicated subjects got more answers right on a series of tests than their sober colleagues. Mostly what happened what that the alcoholically-refreshed people didnt try to work out the answers but used their intuition.  Sometimes we do overthink things especially in exam situations and I really do scream when I see a fantastic answer crossed out in favour of complete bullshit. However, coming drunk to the test on Monday is against UCOL rules...sorry.

more...
No comment yet.