Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works
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Exhilarate 2016: Canadian Positive Psychology Association Announces the 3rd Annual Conference

Exhilarate 2016: Canadian Positive Psychology Association Announces the 3rd Annual Conference | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
The 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/exhilarate2016/294895/?&

 

Sajel Bellon is Chairing a great conference! The Canadian Positive Psychology  Association's 2016 Conference has been announced with Keynotes, and calls for papers and workshops. The conference, in Niagara Falls, is in June. I'm excited by the momentum and honored to be speaking on the idea of the Ai shift from "conscious evolution" to "conscious co-elevation"...   along with Barbara Fredrickson, Kim Cameron, Lea Waters, Caroline Adams Miller, Ryan Niemiec, Shannon Polly and others. Lots of inspiring people, workshops, and organizations--thanks Sajel Bellon for your leadership!   

 

https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/exhilarate2016/294895/?&

 
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What smart businesses know about corporate social responsibility

What smart businesses know about corporate social responsibility | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Companies that are most successful in turning CSR into a business advantage do these three things well.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Within leading organizations, the concept and practice of CSR have made an important leap from “cubicle to boardroom,” contends Alice Korngold, author of A Better World, Inc.: How Companies Profit by Finding Solutions to Global Problems… Where Governments Cannot. In this article, Korngold highlights the three things companies that are most successful in transferring CSR to a business advantage do well. “While CSR once referred to philanthropy and volunteering that merely complemented the business,” she writes, “smart companies recognize that CSR can power their core strategies for today’s dynamic global marketplace.”
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The surprising habits of original thinkers

The surprising habits of original thinkers | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals -- including embracing failure. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones."
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
This is a highly enjoyable and informative TED talk by organizational psychologist, Adam Grant. He is the author of Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World (Viking, 2016), and his talk focuses on how creative people generate ideas. Grant interweaves entertaining and enlightening stories about original thinkers, from Leonardo Da Vinci and Martin Luther King to Steven Jobs and Elon Musk. He also examines how creative people face and overcome challenges such as procrastination, doubts, fear of failure, and plain old bad ideas. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones." Well worth a watch!
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7 Essential Lessons From The Harvard Innovation Lab

Here's what Harvard students learn about how to create an environment where innovation thrives.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Finding successful centers of innovation is always inspirational. Since its inception in 2011, the Harvard Innovation Lab (I-lab) has served as the incubator for more than 600 startups. Launched as an educational and collaborative space, the I-lab provides development opportunities for students interested in entrepreneurship and innovation. As head of the I-lab, Jodi Goldstein relies on a cross disciplinary approach to foster new ways of thinking. She brings 20+ years of experience as a high-tech entrepreneur, consumer lab investor and venture capitalist to her innovation leadership role. “The diversity of ideas is pretty profound,” she declares. Worth reading for the key lessons the center offers to fuel innovation in any business or organization.
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A Nobel Laureate's Plea: Revolutionize Teaching, Abandon Lectures and Cultivate Intrinsic Curiosity.

A Nobel Laureate's Plea: Revolutionize Teaching, Abandon Lectures and Cultivate Intrinsic Curiosity. | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Convinced that big undergraduate lectures are ineffectual, Wieman long ago ditched those big performances in favor of getting students to problem-solve. He gets them actively engaged with course material, working in smaller groups. The techniques have become known as an evidence-based, "active learning" style of teaching.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Revolutionizing teaching means creating settings that cultivate intrinsic, engaged, curiosity. And this Nobel Laureate from Stanford shows how: abandon the lecture as the cornerstone of education and replace it with experiential learning, the kind advocated by David Kolb, John Dewey, and many others. Convinced that big undergraduate lectures are almost totally ineffectual, Wieman long ago ditched those big performances in favor of getting students engaged in discovery. He gets them actively engaged with course material, working in smaller groups. The techniques have become known as an evidence-based, "active learning" style of teaching. 
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2016 Leading to Well-Being Conference

2016 Leading to Well-Being Conference | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
“ Now in its seventh year, George Mason University’s Leading to Well-Being Conference gathers the nation’s top experts in organizational leadership for deep and substantial learning. Widely regarded as the region’s top conference on the intersection of leadership and well-being, our keynote speakers and presenters consult with the country’s top companies, CEOs, organizations and agencies to create meaningful and lasting culture shifts that move them to greater levels of thriving.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I just spoke at the inspiring conference on "Leading to Well-Being" and met with pioneering thought leaders such as Todd Kashdan, Shannon Polly, Dan Siegel, Tojo Thatchenkary, Manjula Nadarajah, and so many more. Now in its seventh year, George Mason University’s Leading to Well-Being Conference gathers the nation’s top experts in organizational leadership "for deep and substantial learning." Widely regarded as the region’s top conference on the intersection of leadership and well-being, it was a joy to see a flowering movement in action--everyone focusing on seeing the best in the world in order to bring the best to the world; focusing on the power of curiosity to cultivate mindfulness, resilience, and health; and focusing on the interdisciplinary scholarship of the relationship between "mind" and "nonlocal brain" and "relationships" where consciousness of connection is uniting quantum physics, spiritual practice, and social construction of reality--what Ken Gergen has called "relational being." Cheers to Nance Lucas and Pam Patterson at George Mason's center for Wellbeing!
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What's next in the employee engagement conversation?

What's next in the employee engagement conversation? | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
we need to look at the process of gauging and influencing engagement – how do we ask questions and what do we do with the results? Currently, an organization may choose to ask the Gallup Q12 questions or a myriad of other employee survey questions looking to find where the “gaps” exist. Perhaps it is in unclear roles and goals, inadequate developmental opportunities, lack of recognition, or not having a best friend at work. So here’s the key question, why are we looking at the “gaps,” rather than what is working? 
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, April 4, 9:13 AM
Interesting mixing of Ai and strengths based engagement survey's. 
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Proprioception of Thought Requires Stillness and the "Explosion of Meditation"

In physiology the term proprioception refers to the capacity of the body to have self-awareness of its own movements.  David Bohm introduced the term “proprioception of thought” to refer to the possibility for thought to become aware of its own movements as well through direct perception.

We could say that practically all the problems of the human race are due to the fact that thought is not proprioceptive.

– David Bohm (Source: On Dialogue, 1996)
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Appreciative inquiry invites us to learn to a new way of thought or co-thinking in ways that help us see the world anew--and this requires what David Bohm calls proprioception of thought.  It is a metacognitive wholism--a consciousness of thought's co-fusion of everything we take to be real, and a metacognitive appreciation of thought thinking about thought.

 

Take the metaphor of a stream being polluted at the source, and everyone downstream doing what they can at their site in the stream, to clean it up. But what if we holistically appreciated the life-giving whole and the sources and springs of purity, not pollution?  David Bohm comments:

 

"Imagine a stream which is being polluted near the source.  The people downstream don’t know about that, so they start removing bits of pollution, trying to purify the water, but perhaps introducing more pollution of another kind as they do so.  What has to be done, therefore, is to see this whole stream, and get to the source of it.  Somewhere, at the source of thought, it is being polluted – that is the suggestion.  Pollution is being diverted into the stream, and this is happening all the time.  You could say, in one sense, the wrong step was when people first started pouring pollution in.  But the fact that we have kept on pouring it in is the main point – it’s pouring in all the time.  Therefore, the source is not in time – not back in ancient times, when it may have started – but rather the source is always now.  That’s what we have to look into." 


Bohm continues:

"If I’m right in saying that thought is the ultimate origin or source [of humanity’s difficulties], it follows that if we don’t do anything about thought, we won’t get anywhere.  We may momentarily relieve the population problem, the ecological problem, and so on, but they will come back in another way.  So I’m saying what we have got to examine this question of thought."

 

– David Bohm (Source: Changing Consciousness: Exploring the Hidden Source of the Social, Political, and Environmental Crises Facing our World: 1991)

 

In this same way that Bohm writes about it my favorite expression on this subject of proprioception of thought was a brief passage by Krishnamurti:

 

"Thought shattering itself against its own nothingness is the explosion of meditation."

 

(Source: Krishnamurti’s Notebook: Page 166) For more go to:

 

http://bohmkrishnamurti.com/essays-etc/there-is-no-activism-there-is-only-proprioception-of-thought/

 


 

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"Conscious Curiosity" by Suzanne Gibbs

"Conscious Curiosity" by Suzanne Gibbs | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Are you ready to use a tool called: conscious curiosity? Are you ready to create conversation and connection with your life partner?
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Conscious Curiosity...

is a book for relationships. We don't often think of "curiosity to connect" but curiosity is at the heart of vital and dynamic relating, attuning, and co-elevating. As my library about curiosity velocity grows it becomes so clear that knowing is also an undergoing--every inquiry changes someone (ourselves) or something (our communities) in some way--sometimes subtle and sometimes tectonic. In marketing there is a concept of "the mere measurement effect" where simply asking questions influences consumer behaviors. But in human systems there is nothing "mere" or small here: we should be instead speaking about the exponential inquiry effect, and leveraging inquiry for good.   


Communicating to Connect is a book for contemporary couples that are serious about reaching new levels of understanding in their relationship through the art of conversation. The content is designed to help couples develop intimate communication and collaboration skills through the process of asking questions. Not simply a few questions, but hundreds of questions. 

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Mounting Evidence That Authentically Positive Work Cultures Are More Productive

Mounting Evidence That Authentically Positive Work Cultures Are More Productive | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Positive Work Cultures Are More Productive
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Is your organization elevated by a "high curiosity culture"....? Curiosity is associated, says Todd Kashdan in his book Curious, with engagement of your signature strengths--when you feel in the zone. This is important for leaders to know because disengagement is costly. In studies by the Queens School of Business and by the Gallup Organization, disengaged workers had 37% higher absenteeism, 49% more accidents, and 60% more errors and defects. In organizations with low employee engagement scores, they experienced 18% lower productivity, 16% lower profitability, 37% lower job growth, and 65% lower share price over time. Importantly, businesses with highly engaged employees enjoyed 100% more job applications.


So how do you unite curiosity, high engagement, and more effective organizations? Well, our experience with Appreciative Inquiry points to "the art of the question" (something you do) but also that special spirit of inquiry (a way of being.)  We all know people who ask great questions and mean it: they genuinely love to connect want to know everything they can about you (they care) or everything they can about the subject at hand. Their thirst for knowing is creates a wonderful viral engagement.    

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Exhilarate 2016: Canadian Positive Psychology Association Announces the 3rd Annual Conference

Exhilarate 2016: Canadian Positive Psychology Association Announces the 3rd Annual Conference | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
The 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/exhilarate2016/294895/?&

 

Sajel Bellon is Chairing a great conference! The Canadian Positive Psychology  Association's 2016 Conference has been announced with Keynotes, and calls for papers and workshops. The conference, in Niagara Falls, is in June. I'm excited by the momentum and honored to be speaking on the idea of the Ai shift from "conscious evolution" to "conscious co-elevation"...   along with Barbara Fredrickson, Kim Cameron, Lea Waters, Caroline Adams Miller, Ryan Niemiec, Shannon Polly and others. Lots of inspiring people, workshops, and organizations--thanks Sajel Bellon for your leadership!   

 

https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/exhilarate2016/294895/?&

 
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SolarWindow: Record Setting Breakthrough

SolarWindow: Record Setting Breakthrough | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

The prospect of a world of 100% clean, abundant, renewable energy is igniting so much innovation and courageous entrepreneurship. We’ve seen several transparent solar cell concepts on websites such as Inhabit, but perhaps none with such ambitious claims as those made by SolarWindow Technologies. The Maryland-based startup announced that their revolutionary power generating windows, which they say can generate 50 times more power than conventional solar panels per building, will soon hit the market. Unlike traditional and opaque PV technology, SolarWindow can be readily applied as a coating to any glass window or plastic surface and instantly generate electricity, even in artificial light and shade. The company claims that the SolarWindow technology can produce more power at a lower cost and offers an incredibly fast ROI of just one year.  That’s incredible, considering that conventional solar systems require at least 5 to 11 years for payback. 


The concept of transparent solar cells that would transform glass-clad skyscrapers into solar farms and turn smartphone screens into solar panels is exciting, but of course not totally new. Last year, Michigan State University scientists unveiled a fully transparent solar concentrator that allows visible light through and uses organic molecules to guide ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths to the edges of the glass, where tiny photovoltaic cells turned the non-visible light into electricity. However, conversion efficiency for that prototype was only at 1% (right now) whereas traditional solar panels typically reach 20 to 25% conversion efficiency.


The prospect of a world of 100% clean, abundant, renewable energy is igniting so much innovation.  What we are going to witness in the next decades will tell us all this: we live in a privileged time and moment in history where we can all make a difference. Putting a spotlight on companies creating the future is what we do with "Business as an Agent of World Benefit."



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David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's curator insight, November 8, 2015 3:37 PM

The prospect of a world of 100% clean, abundant, renewable energy is igniting so much innovation and courageous entrepreneurship. We’ve seen several transparent solar cell concepts on websites such as Inhabit, but perhaps none with such ambitious claims as those made by SolarWindow Technologies. The Maryland-based startup announced that their revolutionary power generating windows, which they say can generate 50 times more power than conventional solar panels per building, will soon hit the market. Unlike traditional and opaque PV technology, SolarWindow can be readily applied as a coating to any glass window or plastic surface and instantly generate electricity, even in artificial light and shade. The company claims that the SolarWindow technology can produce more power at a lower cost and offers an incredibly fast ROI of just one year.  That’s incredible, considering that conventional solar systems require at least 5 to 11 years for payback. 

 

The concept of transparent solar cells that would transform glass-clad skyscrapers into solar farms and turn smartphone screens into solar panels is exciting, but of course not totally new. Last year, Michigan State University scientists unveiled a fully transparent solar concentrator that allows visible light through and uses organic molecules to guide ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths to the edges of the glass, where tiny photovoltaic cells turned the non-visible light into electricity. However, conversion efficiency for that prototype was only at 1% (right now) whereas traditional solar panels typically reach 20 to 25% conversion efficiency.

 

The prospect of a world of 100% clean, abundant, renewable energy is igniting so much innovation.  What we are going to witness in the next decades will tell us all this: we live in a privileged time and moment in history where we can all make a difference. Putting a spotlight on companies creating the future is what we do with "Business as an Agent of World Benefit."

 
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AIM2FLOURISH by Roberta Baskin

AIM2FLOURISH by Roberta Baskin | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Epiphany is defined as a “sudden and striking realization.” But it doesn’t work that way with me. My epiphanies sometimes simmer gently for years, particularly one that emerged in the aftermath of a class I took on Appreciative Inquiry, taught by its guru, Professor David Cooperrider. Because I was a journalist long outraged by the corporate malfeasance I exposed as a network correspondent, David invited me to learn about asking questions from a new perspective. This caused me to shift my view. But I was a journalist, after all, and stubborn. The process was a slow conversion, indeed.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Robert Baskin, a former 20-20 reporter and award winning journalist, is showing the way to a new kind of journalism that is mindful and focused not just on bad news, but stories of images and voices of hope. She discusses, in her recent article, how we’re living in a time where all around us there’s a global shift in consciousness toward optimism. The world is wearying of the worn-out narrative thread about everything that is wrong. There’s an energy coalescing around a solution-driven, energetic, we’re-in-this-together framework. You can find it popping up in online news sites that are devoted to good news. In a sign of the times, the Huffington Post started a section called Good News,1 as well as an even newer one called Impact: What’s Working.2 One of the earliest adopters, the Good News Network3 is all about providing good news to its one and a half million unique visitors a month. The Solutions Journalism Network4 is a project co-founded by two New York Times columnists who are training newsrooms to do solutions-driven reporting about social problems. Roberta and the whole team from the Weatherhead School of Management--from the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit--have added to this movement with an amazing website called www.AIM2Flourish.com ....check it out.  And participate. If you could spotlight any organization that is innovating in some way to create full spectrum flourishing--innovations that are not doing just less harm but radically creating net-positive good for the world and the business--what innovation would you want to spotlight? On the website simply add your spotlight to the section called "sightings" and soon young people and others interested in advancing "business as an agent of world benefit" will pick up the sighting and will do more extensive interviews.

 

As the great Joseph Campbell once remarked about cultural transformation: "awe is what moves us forward."  

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9 Habits of Super Positive People: Make your life an inspiring message

9 Habits of Super Positive People: Make your life an inspiring message | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Wake up every morning with the idea that something wonderful is possible today. – Smiling is a healing energy.  Always find a reason to smile.  It may not add years to your life but will surely add life to your years.  A consistent positive attitude is the cheapest ‘fountain of youth.’  You’ve got to dance like there’s nobody watching, love like you’ll never be hurt, sing like there’s nobody listening, and live like it’s heaven on Earth.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

What's the number one habit of super positive people? I think it's curiosity velocity....curious is a good thing to be;  it seems to pay unexpected dividends.

 

Assuming that something wonderful is possible each day, what if you begin each day with a question like this:  what might emerge or open up to me today that might be exciting, new, and wonderful?  

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Profound Positive Emotion: Researchers study intense awe astronauts feel viewing Earth from space

Profound Positive Emotion: Researchers study intense awe astronauts feel viewing Earth from space | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
By analyzing accounts of awe that result from seeing Earth from space, psychologists delve deep into the psychology of astronauts.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The leader's most creative job is to craft questions that open people to epiphanies. Why? Because it is awe that elevates--it opens minds; creates humility; propels pro-social impulses;  expands wide-angle vision; ignites a reverence for life; inspires innovation; and creates a positive dislodgement of reality through inspiration. Studies of the emotion of awe are teaching us something important: the tremendously transformative power of profound positive emotion.
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7 promising signs we’re moving toward a more sustainable world

7 promising signs we’re moving toward a more sustainable world | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
From enhancing transparency to taking lessons from catastrophe, people are working hard every day to pull our planet back from the brink.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
At times, the current environmental challenges we face can be overwhelming, sometimes to the point of immobilizing us. But there is significant momentum now behind both awareness of those concerns and conscientious responses to counter them. Fortunately, with all of the individuals, groups, organizations and businesses rising to confront the challenges head on and provide effective solutions for sustainability, the tide is turning. In this article, the author identifies seven key areas “where the needle can be and is being moved toward a more sustainable planet.” “In the face of all of this, it’s easy to wonder, ‘Are there still meaningful choices and pathways toward a more sustainable planet?’” he writes. “Thankfully, the answer is that disaster is avoidable.”
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Chobani CEO Giving Employees Large Ownership Stake in Yogurt Empire: "now we are partners" I

Chobani CEO Giving Employees Large Ownership Stake in Yogurt Empire: "now we are partners" I | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
The man who built Chobani yogurt into a multi-billion dollar brand is giving thousands of employees the financial surprise of a lifetime.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The man who built Chobani yogurt into a multi-billion dollar brand is giving thousands of employees the financial surprise of a lifetime telling his employees "now we are partners" 
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Kiran Kandade's curator insight, April 28, 11:05 PM
We have all heard of CEOs who humbly acknowledge their employees contribution in making their organization the success it is. We've heard of CEOs who thank their employees in speeches. We've even heard of CEOs who recognize that their personal wealth is not due to their hard work, leadership, or vision alone but, in fact largely, due to the force of the people behind them....

Now here's a CEO who puts words into action. Hamdi Ulukaya, founder and CEO of Chobani, a multi-billion dollar brand, an immigrant to the U.S from Turkey, decided words were not enough. Being wealthy himself wasn't enough. "Now we are partners" somehow just seemed the right thing to say and do. 
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Bringing solar power and jobs to low-income neighborhoods

Bringing solar power and jobs to low-income neighborhoods | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Mark Davis has gone from pounding the NBA's floor boards to city rooftops, where his firm WDC solar installs solar systems on low income homes.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Former NBA player Mark Davis is making sure that affluent people aren’t the only ones who enjoy the benefits of solar power. He started a company, WDC Solar, that provides solar energy to low-income residents in Washington, DC. The company has already created nearly 20 jobs in the area that offer pay starting at $15 to $23 an hour. WDC furnishes an entrée for the residents into the fast-growing industry, a chance to do well for themselves and partake in the significant energy savings other individuals and businesses are taking advantage across the country. According to Davis, residents can save between 30% to 35% on their energy bills after the solar panels are installed. “It’s money that is staying, going towards groceries, medication, education,” he said. This is a great example of how a business can succeed by providing important, sustainable services while directly strengthening the community around it.
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Appreciating the Photographer's Appreciative Eye: Rare Photographic Moments With Amazing Ocean Animals

Appreciating the Photographer's Appreciative Eye: Rare Photographic Moments With Amazing Ocean Animals | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
In a series of extraordinary photographs made over many expeditions into seldom-visited parts of the ocean, South African wildlife photographers and filmmakers
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Attention without a feeling of gratitude, is not awake.
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Money can buy happiness, but only to a point

Money can buy happiness, but only to a point | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
The effect of money on happiness depends on what you're already making.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

An economist colleague at Case Western Reserve University--David Clingsmith --is doing fascinating research on how how income levels might lower negative affect in life. The difference the marginal dollar makes in reducing negative emotions starts to fall off around $70,000, is very low by $160,000 and hits zero around $200,000.

 

Those results are remarkably similar to the correlations reported in a 2010 study that found that people don't get happier after $75,000 a year.

 

That study analyzed data from the Gallup Organization in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index (GHWBI). It's a lower number because researchers in that case used a single person's income rather than the family income used by Clingingsmith.

While the 2010 study found that three different measures of positive emotion (or lack of negative emotion) saw rapid improvement that slowed to nothing around $75,000, it also looked at a fourth metric that continued to rise far after that point. 

That metric was "life evaluation" — a scale that asks the respondent to rate his or her life from 0, "the worst possible life for you," to 10, "the best possible life for you." It can be thought of as a measurement of how a person judges the success of their own life, rather than the feelings they experience while living it.

That measure seems to be more sensitive to socioeconomic status, the authors noted. People naturally compare their lives and incomes to others', and even if they experience no negative emotions they may yearn for and be more satisfied with higher pay far beyond the level they would need to avoid pain or afford leisure.

 

"That comparison between yourself and other people is really important for one's sense of well-being," said Clingingsmith. "If I'm a trader and making $300,000 at a firm where everyone else is making $450,000, that may feel different."

 
 
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, April 4, 9:20 AM

An economist colleague at Case Western Reserve University--David Clingsmith --is doing fascinating research on how how income levels might lower negative affect in life. The difference the marginal dollar makes in reducing negative emotions starts to fall off around $70,000, is very low by $160,000 and hits zero around $200,000.

 

Those results are remarkably similar to the correlations reported in a 2010 study that found that people don't get happier after $75,000 a year.

 

That study analyzed data from the Gallup Organization in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index (GHWBI). It's a lower number because researchers in that case used a single person's income rather than the family income used by Clingingsmith.

While the 2010 study found that three different measures of positive emotion (or lack of negative emotion) saw rapid improvement that slowed to nothing around $75,000, it also looked at a fourth metric that continued to rise far after that point. 

That metric was "life evaluation" — a scale that asks the respondent to rate his or her life from 0, "the worst possible life for you," to 10, "the best possible life for you." It can be thought of as a measurement of how a person judges the success of their own life, rather than the feelings they experience while living it.

That measure seems to be more sensitive to socioeconomic status, the authors noted. People naturally compare their lives and incomes to others', and even if they experience no negative emotions they may yearn for and be more satisfied with higher pay far beyond the level they would need to avoid pain or afford leisure.

 

"That comparison between yourself and other people is really important for one's sense of well-being," said Clingingsmith. "If I'm a trader and making $300,000 at a firm where everyone else is making $450,000, that may feel different."

 
 
Ricard Lloria's curator insight, April 4, 11:54 AM

An economist colleague at Case Western Reserve University--David Clingsmith --is doing fascinating research on how how income levels might lower negative affect in life. The difference the marginal dollar makes in reducing negative emotions starts to fall off around $70,000, is very low by $160,000 and hits zero around $200,000.

 

Those results are remarkably similar to the correlations reported in a 2010 study that found that people don't get happier after $75,000 a year.

 

That study analyzed data from the Gallup Organization in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index (GHWBI). It's a lower number because researchers in that case used a single person's income rather than the family income used by Clingingsmith.

While the 2010 study found that three different measures of positive emotion (or lack of negative emotion) saw rapid improvement that slowed to nothing around $75,000, it also looked at a fourth metric that continued to rise far after that point. 

That metric was "life evaluation" — a scale that asks the respondent to rate his or her life from 0, "the worst possible life for you," to 10, "the best possible life for you." It can be thought of as a measurement of how a person judges the success of their own life, rather than the feelings they experience while living it.

That measure seems to be more sensitive to socioeconomic status, the authors noted. People naturally compare their lives and incomes to others', and even if they experience no negative emotions they may yearn for and be more satisfied with higher pay far beyond the level they would need to avoid pain or afford leisure.

 

"That comparison between yourself and other people is really important for one's sense of well-being," said Clingingsmith. "If I'm a trader and making $300,000 at a firm where everyone else is making $450,000, that may feel different."

 
 
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Appreciative Inquiry: lessons from a war zone by Anthony Kearns

Appreciative Inquiry: lessons from a war zone by Anthony Kearns | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
“It reminds me of when we were at Scheyville…” (the Officer Training Unit set up in the same month that Australia committed troops to the Vietnam War hhttp://www.otu.asn.au/)

“…the first thing they taught us to do when making decisions under stress in the field was a process called appreciation". 

He went on to describe the appreciation process as one where you first engage with your remaining men to appreciate your assets and capabilities, work together to consider the strategy that will make the most of your collective strengths and then make a decision. 
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

I wrote to Anthony and said:

Love your story and it helps me understand one of the most interesting (to me) insights in my career: Ai soars in its impact in especially complex and challenging and even life-threatening situations. It's not at all superficial--as your military example demonstrates.


Thanks for your post and your learning and sharing spirit.

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(32) Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

(32) Chan Zuckerberg Initiative | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. 280,230 likes. We seek to advance human potential and promote equality.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. You may have heard last week that Mark Zuckerberg and Dr. Priscilla Chan are giving away 99% of their Facebook stock, currently valued at $45 billion, which is larger than the Gates Foundation, valued at $41 billion. But Zuckerberg’s going about it differently: rather than setting up a foundation, he’s setting up an LLC to invest in business for good initiatives that will have an impact from education to internet access. Some in the press have criticized him for this move, but I think it shows his commitment to impact, not tax breaks, to sustainable value creation not as charity but as good business and high purpose business. As a student of "business as an agent of world benefit" this gets me excited because purpose and profit are increasingly linked in a reinforcing set of loops. A new image of philanthropic entrepreneurship is emerging here. The LLC gives so much more flexibility to deploy capital to things that can create the most impact... Learn more at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

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The greenest city mayors take home the fight against climate change

The greenest city mayors take home the fight against climate change | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it

With more than half of the world’s population living in urban areas – responsible for up to 70% of greenhouse gas emissions – it’s vital that cities and their leaders commit to environmental policies.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Mayors of some of the world’s most greening cities are already making them more resilient and are  achieving economic growth by investing in sustainable development. Mayor Jackson of Cleveland is one of the best of the best in terms of convening all stakeholders and making collaborative creation of "a green city on a blue lake" a rallying point to generate a collaborative culture and a new kind of "design democracy" where people move way beyond good dialogue to co-design of everything: renewable energy systems; climate action plans; vibrant neighborhoods; radical energy productivity goals; urban gardens and regenerative food systems; clean water; sustainability education for youth leaders; and more. See this impressive work at 

http://www.sustainablecleveland.org/ and also read about Mayors all over the world leading the way. 

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Autistic Boy With Higher IQ Than Einstein Discovers His Gift After People Stopped Diagnosing Him and Instead Searched For What Inspired Him

Autistic Boy With Higher IQ Than Einstein Discovers His Gift After People Stopped Diagnosing Him and Instead Searched For What Inspired Him | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
a teenage boy who was diagnosed with autism at a young age has risen to stellar heights after quitting the special ed system with the help of his concerned mother.

State therapy specialists claimed Jacob Barnett would never tie his shoes, read or function normally in society. But the boy’s mother realized when Jacob was not in therapy, he was doing “spectacular things” completely on his own.

She decided to trust her instinct and disregard the advice of the professionals. Instead of following a standardized special needs educational protocol, she surrounded Jacob with all the things that inspired passion for him – and was astonished at the transformation that took place.
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Be Curious. Teach Curious.

Be Curious. Teach Curious. | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
To some it may seem strange to be advocating curiosity when everyone else is suggesting we all learn coding,
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

This law teacher is advocating that we educate for curiosity and not coding. She draws lessons from her relentless four year old: "These days my four year old is like those pitching machines used to help improve batting, but instead of balls, it is a fast pace bombardment of why, how, when, and the worst one of all, but you said. Everything to him is novel and potentially engrossing and amazing.? 


A curious mind is flexible. It takes risks, but nothing for granted.  If the recent economic downturn has taught us anything, it is has taught us that the future will require a broad set of skills to be successful and the composition of those skills will alter and necessitate updating at a more frequent pace than in the past. Business leaders taught the importance of innovations. I think we should take one step back. Curiosity is the precursor to innovation. The continual desire to know and to learn helps to prevent obsolescence.

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James Komosinski's curator insight, November 9, 2015 6:17 PM

The difference between "stem" and "steam" is curiosity and knowledge  is driven by the necessity of creating greater human potential..

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Could this crazy creature help us cure cancer?

Could this crazy creature help us cure cancer? | Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works | Scoop.it
“ The naked mole rat may look weird, but scientists have discovered it has a 'gloop’ that could lead to amazing new medicines, says Michael Hanlon”
Via Janine Benyus
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Biomimicry teaches that for "strengths finders" or solution focused leaders, that the theatre for discovery is huge. Take the naked mole rat. scientists now believe it may hold the key to curing cancer .Uncommonly among mammals, mole rats do not get cancer, and last week, scientists announced that they have finally discovered why. They hope the “gloop” that they have identified in the animal could, in due time, form the basis of a host of new medicines to treat not only cancer but diseases ranging from atherosclerosis and heart disease. Nature is so beautiful.
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