Amanda's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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A Midsummer Night's Dream: Anamorphism and Theseus' Dream

A Midsummer Night's Dream: Anamorphism and Theseus' Dream | Amanda's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Literary Criticism: This article recognizes the flaws in "A Midsummer Night's Dream." It criticizes Shakespeare's use of anamorphism, the fairyland, Oberon's obsession with the boy, and more. He comments on how quick all the characters are to forgive one another, for injuries that surely require a more elaborate apology. James Calderwood, the author, also discusses the lack of background and information provided for Theseus. The author even talks about how neglected women are in the play, for there is a strong presence of fathers and a noticable absence of mothers. This article contained many valid points, while also helping to make readers realize the true complexity of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." 

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Fairy in 'The Faerie Queene': Renaissance Elf-Fashioning and Elizabethan My...

Fairy in 'The Faerie Queene': Renaissance Elf-Fashioning and Elizabethan My... | Amanda's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Source: This article is about "The Faerie Queene," which was a series of poems written by Edmund Spencer in 1590. It was a popular series, published a few years before "A Midsummer Night's Dream." This poem, like "A Midsummer Night's Dream," includes the presense of a fairy queen and her fellow fairies. Each has a mystical and magical aspect to its plot. The article mostly discusses a man named Matthew Woodstock's opinion of the poem. He criticizes how little dimention is given to the fairy characters, and the same lack of detail exists in Shakespeare's play. There are many similarities between the two pieces, overall, and there is little doubt that Shakespeare did not borrow a few ideas for his own work.  

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Feminists in Elizabethan England

Feminists in Elizabethan England | Amanda's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Historical: This article discusses the impact of feminists on Elizabethan England. Women were rarely educated, and few actually lived to be anything more than a devoted house wife. However, many females during this time period refused to give in to male superiority. One of these defiant ladies was the Queen of England herself. Queen Elizabeth I even went to the extent of appointing women to positions formerly held by men, all in order to change society's outlook on her gender. In A Midsummer Night's Dream, the rebellious Hermia subconsciously takes on the role of a feminist. She goes against her father's orders and insists on marrying her love, Lysander, rather than her father's choice, Demetrius. Hermia's actions display her disagreement with the traditional opinions of the Elizabethan era. Queen Elizabeth and Hermia share this quality. Each had a goal that they wanted to achieve, but struggled because of the gender-based obstacles they had to face. These women were up against stereotypes that were surely not a force to be reckoned with, yet both still found the courage to overcome the majority. 

 

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Carter Cianci's comment, March 10, 2013 10:56 PM
After reading parts of this article I realized it is very similar to mine. I like the flow and organization of the topics and found many similarities. Some topics both our articles on feminism are lack of education, how women's job is to be a housewife, and how women were forced into marriage. After reading your article and listening to John and my presentation on feminist, do you think that in Shakespeare's writing he wrote about many things women were not allowed to do to promote equality? :)
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Titania and Bottom

Titania and Bottom | Amanda's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Picture: This image is of the characters Titania and Bottom. It shows Bottom as an ass, which is the result of Puck's use of spells. It also depicts Titania's behavior while she is under the spell that Oberon cast over her. The picture shows how Titania is overwhelmingly kind to Bottom, and how she is ordering her fairy servants to cater to his every need. Titania is completely in love with Bottom during this scene, for he appears to be a beast, and that is what the spell was intended to attract her to. Her affection can be seen in this picture by how she's treating Bottom. It looks as if she is petting his head and ears. Due to Titania's charmed behavior in the play and this image, it can be stated that this photo is quite accurrate.

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A Midsummer Night's Dream

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) SDSU's lively 1960's adaptation of the classic comedy is designed to give high school students (and those new to Shakespeare) an ...
Amanda Levenson's insight:

Video: This video is a modern adaptation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Their rendition does follow the original plot; however, they perform it differently. This version adds a musical element to the traditional play. Characters occassionally stop and sing, which was surely something Shakespeare had never anticipated. The addition of song and dance to A Midsummer Night's Dream makes it more interesting. Present day audiences may find Shakespearean language uneventful and difficult to follow, so the use of music is a great way to maintain their attention. Also, adding musical numbers was this group's way of combining modern theatrical culture with timeless Shakespearean work. Although their changes may have been small, those alterations provided a dynamic link between the past and present.  

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