Additive Manufacture
17 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

Automotive Parts 3D Printed Using Low-Cost Titanium Powders - Azom.com

Automotive Parts 3D Printed Using Low-Cost Titanium Powders - Azom.com | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
Azom.com Automotive Parts 3D Printed Using Low-Cost Titanium Powders Azom.com The Mercury Centre, which sits within the Department of Materials at Sheffield University, used Renishaw's 3D printer to make the parts, demonstrating the feasibility of...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

Is additive manufacturing finally ready for lift off? - Engineering Materials

Is additive manufacturing finally ready for lift off?
Engineering Materials
And that is likely to remain the case for some years yet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

NSF-The Engineering Behind Additive Manufacturing and the 3-D ...

NSF-The Engineering Behind Additive Manufacturing and the 3-D ... | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
While 3-D pens and printers are enjoyed by students, artists and makers, innovative American companies are using similar equipment to manufacture aerospace, automotive and medical technologies. The number of ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

firm aims to print replacement body parts - Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

firm aims to print replacement body parts - Rochester Democrat and Chronicle | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
firm aims to print replacement body parts Rochester Democrat and Chronicle Additive manufacturing, better known as 3D printing, accounts for a fraction of all manufacturing today, but it promises to ultimately change the way most things are made...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth from 3D Printing and Fabbing
Scoop.it!

Creating waterproof, pressure capable electrical connectors with 3D printing

Creating waterproof, pressure capable electrical connectors with 3D printing | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
Coho Designs explored the possibilities of FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printing to create permanent, waterproof, pressure capable over-molded electrical connectors.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

3-D printing comes of age | NetworkWorld.com

3-D printing comes of age | NetworkWorld.com | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it

Boeing, NASA, Lockheed Martin and GE are among the large corporations that for decades have used additive manufacturing, known more popularly as 3-D printing.

 

Additive manufacturing is also used prominently in the medical and dental industries -- about 80,000 hip implants have been made to date using 3-D printers, and every day some 15,000 tooth crowns and fillings are made with parts from 3-D printers, said Terry Wohlers, an industry analyst.

 

It was only about six or seven years ago that people began invoking dimensions to give "additive manufacturing" the trendier 3-D printing name. The rise of a movement among consumers known as "maker culture," a type of do-it-yourself philosophy geared toward engineering-related pursuits such as 3-D printing, robotics and electronics, is one possible explanation for the name change.

 

But analysts also point to a singular event: the expiration in the late 2000s of a key patent held by Stratasys covering fused deposition modeling. Growth in the consumer market has been impressive since then, because the technology, also known as material extrusion, is now used in other companies' 3-D printers.

 

The extrusion process produces an object by melting and depositing molten plastic through a heated extrusion tip. Like other additive manufacturing processes, it adds one layer upon another until the part is complete. Alternative methods include material jetting, which uses an inkjet print head to deposit liquid plastic layer by layer. Another is powder bed fusion, which uses an energy source, like a focused laser, to build parts from plastic or metal powder.

 

Those three processes are the most popular, Wohlers said.

3-D printing has some challenges, both for consumers and industry. For consumers, the quality of the lower-cost machines isn't great, said Wohlers. They're hard to set up, sometimes there are pieces missing, and their reliability and output is not always very good, he said.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

World's First 3D Printed Metal Gun Successfully Fires 600+ Rounds - CNSNews.com

World's First 3D Printed Metal Gun Successfully Fires 600+ Rounds - CNSNews.com | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
World's First 3D Printed Metal Gun Successfully Fires 600+ Rounds CNSNews.com “We're proving this is possible, the technology is at a place now where we can manufacture a gun with 3D metal printing,” Kent Firestone, vice president of additive...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

Small advantage: 3-D printing brings short-run manufacturing back home - Financial Post

Small advantage: 3-D printing brings short-run manufacturing back home - Financial Post | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
Small advantage: 3-D printing brings short-run manufacturing back home
Financial Post
The technology at the centre of the revolution is a suite of techniques known collectively as 3-D printing, or additive manufacturing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

FDM Nylon 12 Could Be Toughest in Additive Manufacturing - 3D ...

FDM Nylon 12 Could Be Toughest in Additive Manufacturing - 3D ... | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
FDM Nylon 12 out-performs on toughness and mechanical properties, exhibiting 100% improvement in elongation at break and also offers superior fatigue and chemical resistance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

The Engineer Q&A: additive manufacturing - The Engineer

The Engineer Q&A: additive manufacturing - The Engineer | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
The Engineer Q&A: additive manufacturing
The Engineer
What sectors will see the biggest changes as additive manufacturing becomes commonplace?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

Is 3D printing ushering in the third Industrial Revolution? - MaRS

Is 3D printing ushering in the third Industrial Revolution? - MaRS | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
Three-dimensional printing or additive manufacturing is the process of creating tangible objects by depositing material layer upon layer. While the technology has been around since the 1980s, it has only gained widespread ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

Energy savings in 3-D - R & D Magazine

Energy savings in 3-D - R & D Magazine | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
Energy savings in 3-D
R & D Magazine
ORNL 3-D printer in use. Image: ORNL Researchers at the U.S. Dept.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

WIRED: First 3-D Printed Car Is as Strong as Steel, Half the Weight, and Nearing Production

WIRED: First 3-D Printed Car Is as Strong as Steel, Half the Weight, and Nearing Production | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
The future of urban runabouts will be ultra lightweight, electrically powered and 3D-printed... if Jim Kor has his way.

 

Picture an assembly line not that isn’t made up of robotic arms spewing sparks to weld heavy steel, but a warehouse of plastic-spraying printers producing light, cheap and highly efficient automobiles.

 

If Jim Kor’s dream is realized, that’s exactly how the next generation of urban runabouts will be produced. His creation is called the Urbee 2 and it could revolutionize parts manufacturing while creating a cottage industry of small-batch automakers intent on challenging the status quo.

 

Urbee’s approach to maximum miles per gallon starts with lightweight construction – something that 3-D printing is particularly well suited for. The designers were able to focus more on the optimal automobile physics, rather than working to install a hyper efficient motor in a heavy steel-body automobile. As the Urbee shows, making a car with this technology has a slew of beneficial side effects.

 

Jim Kor is the engineering brains behind the Urbee. He’s designed tractors, buses, even commercial swimming pools. Between teaching classes, he heads Kor Ecologic, the firm responsible for the 3-D printed creation.

“We thought long and hard about doing a second one,” he says of the Urbee. “It’s been the right move.”

 

Kor and his team built the three-wheel, two-passenger vehicle at RedEye, an on-demand 3-D printing facility. The printers he uses create ABS plastic via Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). The printer sprays molten polymer to build the chassis layer by microscopic layer until it arrives at the complete object. The machines are so automated that the building process they perform is known as “lights out” construction, meaning Kor uploads the design for a bumper, walk away, shut off the lights and leaves. A few hundred hours later, he’s got a bumper. The whole car – which is about 10 feet long – takes about 2,500 hours.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

Urbee 2 to attempt US crossing using ten gallons of fuel | GizMag.com

Urbee 2 to attempt US crossing using ten gallons of fuel | GizMag.com | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it

Urbee 2, the first road-ready, fuel-efficient car built using 3D printing, is the subject of a collaboration between design firm KOR EcoLogic, direct digital manufacturers RedEye On Demand, and 3D-printing manufacturer Stratsys. Their aim is to put the 7 hp (5 kW) three-wheeled, rear-steering eco-hybrid on the roads by 2015, and then demonstrate its capabilities by crossing the US using only ten gallons (38 L) of fuel.

 

The first Urbee, introduced in 2010, combined a fuel-efficient 5 hp (3.8 kW) hybrid drive and a 3D-printed body with excellent aerodynamic performance to achieve over 200 mpg on the highway. However, the original 3D-printed body was made using a great deal of excess material to produce strength without the benefit of careful designing. The safety of the car in a crash was also questionable. As a result, the Urbee was a successful concept car, but stopped there.

 

Stopped, that is, until the Urbee 2 came along. Urbee 2 shares the same general design, being a three-wheeled two-seater that is steered by a single wheel in the rear of the vehicle. It will weigh about 1,200 lbs (550 kg), some thirty percent less than the original Urbee.

 

Click headline to read more, view pix and watch video clip--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 11, 2013 1:01 PM

Great new techology may be soon on it's way to us.

Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

Pretty in Pink: 3D-Printing 'Jimmy Choos' for Horses - LiveScience.com

Pretty in Pink: 3D-Printing 'Jimmy Choos' for Horses - LiveScience.com | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
Pretty in Pink: 3D-Printing 'Jimmy Choos' for Horses
LiveScience.com
Gone are the days when a sinewy blacksmith would hammer out a set of horseshoes over a hot anvil.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Imogen Eloise Howarth
Scoop.it!

New £250k 3D printing hub opens in Manchester - TCT Magazine

New £250k 3D printing hub opens in Manchester - TCT Magazine | Additive Manufacture | Scoop.it
New £250k 3D printing hub opens in Manchester
TCT Magazine
Though the TCT offices are based in the North West of England, other additive manufacturing and 3D printing outfits remain relatively scant.
more...
No comment yet.