Alternative Dispu...
Follow
2.8K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Scoop.it!

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) up for discussion - Lexology (registration)

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) up for discussion - Lexology (registration) | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) up for discussion Lexology (registration) In recent years, the courts in England and Wales have placed a greater emphasis on encouraging parties to explore Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to assist in...
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Expanding the critical perspective of justice to suggest restorative processes and ADR as tools for reparation.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Win Community Approval for New Business Construction

Win Community Approval for New Business Construction | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Our polling also shows that those who are less educated, and less wealthy, and who live in rental housing, are more likely to support new development, but those supporters are less passionate than opponents and therefore are less likely to participate in the approval process.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Leadership Think Tank
Scoop.it!

11 Simple Actions To Make Your Company More Socially Responsible

11 Simple Actions To Make Your Company More Socially Responsible | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it

YEC (Young Entrepreneur Council) surveyed some more folks about the importance of companies being socially responsible. Here are the responses


Via Roger Francis, Aki Puustinen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Conflict transformation, peacebuilding and security
Scoop.it!

From Conflict Resolution to Strategic Peacebuilding [Full Episode]

From Conflict Resolution to Strategic Peacebuilding From Conflict Resolution to Strategic Peacebuilding From Conflict Resolution to Strategic Peacebuilding ...

Via CoPeSeNetwork
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Cannabis Growing Cop Nets $200,000 From Buffalo Police Department

Cannabis Growing Cop Nets $200,000 From Buffalo Police Department | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
In March of 2012, Buffalo Police Officer Jorge L. Melendez was caught growing more than 1,000 marijuana plants in a warehouse he owns on South Park Avenue. He was fired in May of 2012, pleaded guilty in August of 2014 and was sentenced to five …
Rob Duke's insight:

Follow your procedures....a month's extra pay is nothing in the big scheme of things....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Signs That You’re Being Too Stubborn

Signs That You’re Being Too Stubborn | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Stubbornness is the ugly side of perseverance. Those who exhibit this attribute cling to the notion that they’re passionate, decisive, full of conviction, and able to stand their ground — all of which are admirable leadership characteristics. Being stubborn isn’t always a bad thing. But if you’re standing your ground for the wrong reasons (e.g. you can’t stand to be wrong, you only want to do things your way), are you really doing the right thing?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How companies motivate employees when there are no promotions to hand out

“If you’re going to promise people that if they work for you for three years they’re going to get promoted, you need to make sure that you need people at higher-level positions three years from now,” Powell says. “When you’re managing your workforce, you need to manage the careers of the workers themselves.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How to Show Trustworthiness in a Job Interview

How to Show Trustworthiness in a Job Interview | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Warmth signals that you have good intentions toward the perceiver, and competence signals that you can act on those good intentions. A warm and competent interviewee is a valuable potential ally. But a competent interviewee who doesn’t project warmth is a potentially formidable foe – the kind of person who may not be a team player, and who may cause trouble for you down the road.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Don’t Let Emotions Screw Up Your Decisions

Don’t Let Emotions Screw Up Your Decisions | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
research shows it is also possible for emotions triggered by one event to spill over and affect another, unrelated situation.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Four “I’s” of Every Transformational Leader

The Four “I’s” of Every Transformational Leader | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
For the first time after several years working in a big corporation I felt the presence of a real leader, not just another manager.

Via Anne Leong
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression

A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Episode #165
A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression
« previous episode
Thursday, April 30, 2015

Play00:00 / 00:00
ListenAddDownloadEmbed
Stream m3u
If you've put your worst foot forward the first time you meet someone, all is not lost. There's a way to shake awful first impressions. (TATSIANAMA/Shutterstock)
There’s nothing worse than walking away from a job interview or meeting someone for the first time and smashing the heel of your hand to forehead while crying out, “I really blew it!”

We’re constantly told how important it is to make a good first impression, but what happens if you had a bad day or made a flub while speaking or you just aren’t that warm of a person when people first meet you.Can you recover?

Heidi Grant Halvorson says, yes, you can get a chance at a second impression and wrote about how you can in an article for the Harvard Business Review (she’s so sure of it that she even has a new book on the subject No One Understands You and What To Do About It).

In an interview with Charlie Herman, host of Money Talking, Halvorson says one of the biggest issues in making a good impression is that we often think we know how we're coming off, but in truth, we have no idea what's going on in other people's minds when they meet us for the first time. That's why she says we need to ask trusted friends how people perceive us. And then we need to be intentional about how we interact with people around us.

(Listen above for the complete interview.)

First, she suggests empathy. Usually, she says, when we first meet, we're sizing each other up with two key questions:

Are you friend or foe?
Are you competent? That is, will you be a potentially powerful ally or enemy?
As we unconsciously answer these two questions, our brains are painting portraits of the people around us in the first moments we meet. And those pictures — often drawn in caricature — can be very hard to erase.

Because of our fears about making a good first impression, especially at work, Halvorson says our initial instincts are to try to come across as smart and competent. But she argues that in that first meeting, warmth is more important. The first impressions people have of us come from their guts, so it's not about how good you are at your job, yet. In a job interview, you'll get to prove that with your resume and your answers to questions. But before you exude confidence, you need to show people you'll be a team player and someone who's easy to manage. 

Halvorson says it's also important to be deliberate about what your body is doing: Smile when people smile at you, make eye contact, nod and affirm your colleagues' comments because it’s not just about what you say, but how you communicate non-verbally with other people. 

And if you do make a bad impression, she suggests two ways to turn it around:

The Long View: Over time, provide the people around you with consistent evidence that their first impression is wrong. For example, if you have a reputation for being late, be early for weeks on end, over and over. Arriving on time once or twice will seem like a fluke; being ready, right on time, every time, will get people to reassess their opinion about your timeliness.
Quick Fix: If you get the sense someone doesn't like you, ask to be assigned to that person. You'll have the chance to have that person rely on you for results. If you can deliver, you can expect they will change how they look at you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

When It’s Safe to Rely on Intuition (and When It’s Not)

When It’s Safe to Rely on Intuition (and When It’s Not) | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The types of problems that do not benefit from intuition are ones that have clear decision rules, objective criteria, and abundant data with which to perform an analysis. In making a medical diagnosis, for example, computer algorithms tend to be more accurate than an experienced medical doctor’s judgment.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. When you're an expert and there are certain artful skills that make intuition foundational in some way.

2. The type of decision is not one that relies on analysis.

3. When you must decide quickly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team

Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Myth #1: There is no place for emotion in the workplace. If you have humans in the workplace, you’re going to have emotions too. Ignoring, stifling, or invalidating them will only drive the toxic issues underground. This outdated notion is one reason people resort to passive-aggressive behavior: emotions will find their outlet, the choice is whether it’s out in the open or in the shadows.

Myth #2: We don’t have time to talk about people’s feelings. Do you have time for backroom dealings and subterfuge? Do you have time for re-opened decisions? Do you have time for failed implementations? Avoiding the emotional issues at the outset will only delay their impact. And when people don’t feel heard, their feelings amplify until you have something really destructive to deal with.

Myth #3: Emotions will skew our decision making. Emotions are already affecting your decision making. The choice is whether you want to be explicit about how (and how much) of a role they play or whether you want to leave them as unspoken biases.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. Spot it

2. Active Listening

3. Apply your resolving skills

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How to Motivate Yourself When Your Boss Doesn’t

“Employees have more control than they realize over their ability to build and sustain motivation in the workplace,”
Rob Duke's insight:

I.D. your own motivators

Solicit feedback

Build a support system

Set reasonable goals

Use If/Then analysis

Don't dwell on mistakes

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

An Organization-Wide Approach to Good Decision Making

An Organization-Wide Approach to Good Decision Making | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Behavioral economists and psychologists have uncovered scores of biases that undermine good decision-making. And, along with management experts, they have provided helpful tips that decision-makers can use to try to correct for those biases.

Via Richard Andrews, donhornsby
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, May 28, 9:56 AM

(From the article): Your teams are freed to focus on each element of this rational decision-making model and identify gaps in the quality of a decision. Instead of sticking to biases or getting mired in politics, people work to fill those gaps, with analytics providing a clear line of sight to the most value. Further, by satisfying all six elements of DQ, companies can recognize the quality of a decision as they make it, not just in hindsight. The result: far fewer failed strategies, far less wasted capital in investment decisions, and — to everyone’s great relief — fewer blame games and witch hunts.


The hard truth is we all leave a lot of value on the table – value that we could seize with better decisions. Doing so requires an organization-wide framework for making them.

Expressworks International's curator insight, Today, 12:47 PM

Use of trusted third parties as honest brokers may help companies ensure that confirmation bias isn't part of the decision making process.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

10 Ways Children Of Divorce Love VERY Differently

10 Ways Children Of Divorce Love VERY Differently | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
So ... you're in love with a child of divorce, are you?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Avoid Getting Screwed By The Arbitration Trap

Avoid Getting Screwed By The Arbitration Trap | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
More and more these days, consumers are being forced to sign Arbitration Agreements when they sign purchase agreements. There are numerous arguments against them but I’ll point out one thing: Arbitration is dangerously unpredictable and unfair.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Feeling depressed? You probably aren’t getting enough sleep, study says

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How Companies Crush Women’s Ambitions

How Companies Crush Women’s Ambitions | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
After just two years on the job, women's desire to reach the top ranks of management and confidence in their ability plummets.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

To Win People Over, Speak to Their Wants and Needs

To Win People Over, Speak to Their Wants and Needs | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The same thing happens in business all the time. Whether you’re trying to get your team on board with a new way of working, asking investors to fund you, persuading customers to buy your product, or imploring the public to donate to your cause, your success depends on your ability to grasp the wants and needs of the people around you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Necessary Art of Persuasion

The Necessary Art of Persuasion | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Gone are the command-and-control days of executives managing by decree. Today businesses are run largely by cross-functional teams of peers and populated by baby boomers and their Generation X offspring, who show little tolerance for unquestioned authority. Electronic communication and globalization have further eroded the traditional hierarchy, as ideas and people flow more freely than ever around organizations and as decisions get made closer to the markets. These fundamental changes, more than a decade in the making but now firmly part of the economic landscape, essentially come down to this: work today gets done in an environment where people don’t just ask What should I do? but Why should I do it?

To answer this why question effectively is to persuade.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. You need to be credible;

2. Find the common ground;

3. Provide evidence; and

4. Connect emotionally.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Hard Data on Being a Nice Boss

There’s an age-old question out there: Is it better to be a “nice” leader to get your staff to like you? Or to be tough as nails to inspire respect and hard work? Despite the recent enthusiasm for wellness initiatives like mindfulness and meditation at the office, and despite the movement toward more horizontal organizational charts, most people still assume the latter is best.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Labor relations agency seeks hearing on Fairbanks police contract dispute

Labor relations agency seeks hearing on Fairbanks police contract dispute | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
An Alaska Labor Relations Agency hearing officer has found "probable cause" that the city of Fairbanks bargained in bad faith with its police union last year when the city council approved a contract in August and reversed that decision in November.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team

Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Start addressing your problem by creating a simple culture map using the eight scales. Plot out each culture on the eight dimensions and draw a line connecting all eight points.
Rob Duke's insight:

See the chart in the article.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How to Respond When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work

How to Respond When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Do:

Give yourself time to calm down and assess the situation
Be clear about your contributions whenever you get an opportunity
Ask colleagues to mention your name when the idea or project comes up in conversation

Don’t:

Feel like you need to get credit for every single thing you do
Presume that the person had malicious intentions ­— credit stealing is often an accident
Make any accusations ­— instead ask the person questions to try to figure out why it happened
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 11, 8:44 PM

It does matter who gets credit as recognition for one's actions are what build trust. The opposite happens when others take credit and are allowed to take credit.

 

@ivon_ehd1