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Negotiation experts on how to end the shutdown - Washington Post (blog)

Negotiation experts on how to end the shutdown - Washington Post (blog) | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Washington Post (blog) Negotiation experts on how to end the shutdown Washington Post (blog) Anyone hoping for a quick and tidy shutdown fix following President Obama's meeting with House and Senate leaders at the White House was bound to be...
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Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Expanding the critical perspective of justice to suggest restorative processes and ADR as tools for reparation.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Signs That You’re Being Too Stubborn

Signs That You’re Being Too Stubborn | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Stubbornness is the ugly side of perseverance. Those who exhibit this attribute cling to the notion that they’re passionate, decisive, full of conviction, and able to stand their ground — all of which are admirable leadership characteristics. Being stubborn isn’t always a bad thing. But if you’re standing your ground for the wrong reasons (e.g. you can’t stand to be wrong, you only want to do things your way), are you really doing the right thing?
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How companies motivate employees when there are no promotions to hand out

“If you’re going to promise people that if they work for you for three years they’re going to get promoted, you need to make sure that you need people at higher-level positions three years from now,” Powell says. “When you’re managing your workforce, you need to manage the careers of the workers themselves.”
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How to Show Trustworthiness in a Job Interview

How to Show Trustworthiness in a Job Interview | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Warmth signals that you have good intentions toward the perceiver, and competence signals that you can act on those good intentions. A warm and competent interviewee is a valuable potential ally. But a competent interviewee who doesn’t project warmth is a potentially formidable foe – the kind of person who may not be a team player, and who may cause trouble for you down the road.
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Don’t Let Emotions Screw Up Your Decisions

Don’t Let Emotions Screw Up Your Decisions | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
research shows it is also possible for emotions triggered by one event to spill over and affect another, unrelated situation.
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The Four “I’s” of Every Transformational Leader

The Four “I’s” of Every Transformational Leader | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
For the first time after several years working in a big corporation I felt the presence of a real leader, not just another manager.

Via Anne Leong
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A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression

A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Episode #165
A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression
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Thursday, April 30, 2015

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If you've put your worst foot forward the first time you meet someone, all is not lost. There's a way to shake awful first impressions. (TATSIANAMA/Shutterstock)
There’s nothing worse than walking away from a job interview or meeting someone for the first time and smashing the heel of your hand to forehead while crying out, “I really blew it!”

We’re constantly told how important it is to make a good first impression, but what happens if you had a bad day or made a flub while speaking or you just aren’t that warm of a person when people first meet you.Can you recover?

Heidi Grant Halvorson says, yes, you can get a chance at a second impression and wrote about how you can in an article for the Harvard Business Review (she’s so sure of it that she even has a new book on the subject No One Understands You and What To Do About It).

In an interview with Charlie Herman, host of Money Talking, Halvorson says one of the biggest issues in making a good impression is that we often think we know how we're coming off, but in truth, we have no idea what's going on in other people's minds when they meet us for the first time. That's why she says we need to ask trusted friends how people perceive us. And then we need to be intentional about how we interact with people around us.

(Listen above for the complete interview.)

First, she suggests empathy. Usually, she says, when we first meet, we're sizing each other up with two key questions:

Are you friend or foe?
Are you competent? That is, will you be a potentially powerful ally or enemy?
As we unconsciously answer these two questions, our brains are painting portraits of the people around us in the first moments we meet. And those pictures — often drawn in caricature — can be very hard to erase.

Because of our fears about making a good first impression, especially at work, Halvorson says our initial instincts are to try to come across as smart and competent. But she argues that in that first meeting, warmth is more important. The first impressions people have of us come from their guts, so it's not about how good you are at your job, yet. In a job interview, you'll get to prove that with your resume and your answers to questions. But before you exude confidence, you need to show people you'll be a team player and someone who's easy to manage. 

Halvorson says it's also important to be deliberate about what your body is doing: Smile when people smile at you, make eye contact, nod and affirm your colleagues' comments because it’s not just about what you say, but how you communicate non-verbally with other people. 

And if you do make a bad impression, she suggests two ways to turn it around:

The Long View: Over time, provide the people around you with consistent evidence that their first impression is wrong. For example, if you have a reputation for being late, be early for weeks on end, over and over. Arriving on time once or twice will seem like a fluke; being ready, right on time, every time, will get people to reassess their opinion about your timeliness.
Quick Fix: If you get the sense someone doesn't like you, ask to be assigned to that person. You'll have the chance to have that person rely on you for results. If you can deliver, you can expect they will change how they look at you.
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When It’s Safe to Rely on Intuition (and When It’s Not)

When It’s Safe to Rely on Intuition (and When It’s Not) | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The types of problems that do not benefit from intuition are ones that have clear decision rules, objective criteria, and abundant data with which to perform an analysis. In making a medical diagnosis, for example, computer algorithms tend to be more accurate than an experienced medical doctor’s judgment.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. When you're an expert and there are certain artful skills that make intuition foundational in some way.

2. The type of decision is not one that relies on analysis.

3. When you must decide quickly.

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Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team

Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Myth #1: There is no place for emotion in the workplace. If you have humans in the workplace, you’re going to have emotions too. Ignoring, stifling, or invalidating them will only drive the toxic issues underground. This outdated notion is one reason people resort to passive-aggressive behavior: emotions will find their outlet, the choice is whether it’s out in the open or in the shadows.

Myth #2: We don’t have time to talk about people’s feelings. Do you have time for backroom dealings and subterfuge? Do you have time for re-opened decisions? Do you have time for failed implementations? Avoiding the emotional issues at the outset will only delay their impact. And when people don’t feel heard, their feelings amplify until you have something really destructive to deal with.

Myth #3: Emotions will skew our decision making. Emotions are already affecting your decision making. The choice is whether you want to be explicit about how (and how much) of a role they play or whether you want to leave them as unspoken biases.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. Spot it

2. Active Listening

3. Apply your resolving skills

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17 Action Steps to Take During Hard Times

17 Action Steps to Take During Hard Times | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
It’s one thing to have a bad day yet quite another to fall on hard times. These are the times that shape character and show what you’re made of.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 28, 9:07 AM

(From the article):  Make sure to learn from the experience. You may have to apply this lesson another day. One thing this teaches us is that life is filled with “ups and downs,” so make the most of the “in-betweens.”

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A five-step guide to not being stupid

Even the smartest people can be fools. David Robson explains how to avoid the most common traps of sloppy thinking.
Rob Duke's insight:

From the article:

1. Blind spots

2. Humble pie

3. Don't pull punches with yourself

4. Imagine "what if..."

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Why All Managers Must Be Leaders

Why All Managers Must Be Leaders | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Anyone within an organization has the potential to become a leader, but managers must be leaders. In schools and in our organizations we have been taught and conditioned to believe that managers and leaders are two separate people which is quite a harmful assumption. As a result we have managers [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Ivon Prefontaine
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Laura Saavedra's curator insight, April 19, 11:01 AM

I agree!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 24, 11:47 PM

The article echoes Peter Vaills work which suggests a concept called managerleader.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Ian Berry's curator insight, April 26, 12:23 AM

I like this. I see though (and my work with clients is about this) in many places a going much further than this. I think both leadership and management are every person's role. The biggest shift happening in remarkable workplaces and a necessity in the new world of work is that people management is a dead concept. See my definitions of leadership and management that have stood the test for two decades at http://www.ianberry.biz/tailored-leadership-mastery-programs/

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Are Bad Managers Holding Back Your Best Talent?

Are Bad Managers Holding Back Your Best Talent? | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
I am ashamed to admit it, but I followed her advice and, sure enough, the secretary was snatched up by a manager in another division. Evidently this kind of dysfunctional behavior is not uncommon; in Brazil there is even a term for it, “people trafficking.”
Rob Duke's insight:

The Peter Principle at work....

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Feeling depressed? You probably aren’t getting enough sleep, study says

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How Companies Crush Women’s Ambitions

How Companies Crush Women’s Ambitions | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
After just two years on the job, women's desire to reach the top ranks of management and confidence in their ability plummets.
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To Win People Over, Speak to Their Wants and Needs

To Win People Over, Speak to Their Wants and Needs | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The same thing happens in business all the time. Whether you’re trying to get your team on board with a new way of working, asking investors to fund you, persuading customers to buy your product, or imploring the public to donate to your cause, your success depends on your ability to grasp the wants and needs of the people around you.
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The Necessary Art of Persuasion

The Necessary Art of Persuasion | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Gone are the command-and-control days of executives managing by decree. Today businesses are run largely by cross-functional teams of peers and populated by baby boomers and their Generation X offspring, who show little tolerance for unquestioned authority. Electronic communication and globalization have further eroded the traditional hierarchy, as ideas and people flow more freely than ever around organizations and as decisions get made closer to the markets. These fundamental changes, more than a decade in the making but now firmly part of the economic landscape, essentially come down to this: work today gets done in an environment where people don’t just ask What should I do? but Why should I do it?

To answer this why question effectively is to persuade.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. You need to be credible;

2. Find the common ground;

3. Provide evidence; and

4. Connect emotionally.

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The Hard Data on Being a Nice Boss

There’s an age-old question out there: Is it better to be a “nice” leader to get your staff to like you? Or to be tough as nails to inspire respect and hard work? Despite the recent enthusiasm for wellness initiatives like mindfulness and meditation at the office, and despite the movement toward more horizontal organizational charts, most people still assume the latter is best.
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Labor relations agency seeks hearing on Fairbanks police contract dispute

Labor relations agency seeks hearing on Fairbanks police contract dispute | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
An Alaska Labor Relations Agency hearing officer has found "probable cause" that the city of Fairbanks bargained in bad faith with its police union last year when the city council approved a contract in August and reversed that decision in November.
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Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team

Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Start addressing your problem by creating a simple culture map using the eight scales. Plot out each culture on the eight dimensions and draw a line connecting all eight points.
Rob Duke's insight:

See the chart in the article.

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How to Respond When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work

How to Respond When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Do:

Give yourself time to calm down and assess the situation
Be clear about your contributions whenever you get an opportunity
Ask colleagues to mention your name when the idea or project comes up in conversation

Don’t:

Feel like you need to get credit for every single thing you do
Presume that the person had malicious intentions ­— credit stealing is often an accident
Make any accusations ­— instead ask the person questions to try to figure out why it happened
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 11, 8:44 PM

It does matter who gets credit as recognition for one's actions are what build trust. The opposite happens when others take credit and are allowed to take credit.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Reinventing Performance Management

Reinventing Performance Management | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
How one company is rethinking peer feedback and the annual review, and trying to design a system to fuel improvement

Via Andrew Gerkens
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Andrew Gerkens's curator insight, April 28, 2:43 AM

A great article that looks at practical ways and a common mindset for supporting and improving performance. Regular 1:1 discussions (or check-ins) are included, with a great quote,

 'These check-ins are not in addition to the work of a team leader; they are the work of a team leader'

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Video: Adam Sandler's Producer To Native Actors: 'Sensitive? You Can Leave'

In an exclusive video obtained by Native actor, Goldie Tom, Native actors discuss their disappointment on the set of the Adam Sandler movie.
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Building trust: It's not a one-and-done deal

Building trust: It's not a one-and-done deal | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
What role does trust play in employee engagement? It’s a fairly large one, according to this Towers Watson research. The study cites leaders’ ability to

Via Anne Leong
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Assessment: Are People Likely to Misunderstand You?

Assessment: Are People Likely to Misunderstand You? | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Answer these questions to see how you compare with others.
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