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Adjunct Professor Dies Destitute, Then Sparks Debate : NPR

Adjunct Professor Dies Destitute, Then Sparks Debate : NPR | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The death of a Duquesne University adjunct professor sparked sharp anger over the treatment of part-time faculty.
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Organization is a way to normalize tense relations.

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Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Expanding the critical perspective of justice to suggest restorative processes and ADR as tools for reparation.
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Veteran Cop: 'If You Don't Want To Get Shot,' Shut Up -- Even If We're Violating Your Rights

Veteran Cop: 'If You Don't Want To Get Shot,' Shut Up -- Even If We're Violating Your Rights | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Sunil Dutta, a 17-year veteran of the Los Angeles Police Department and adjunct instructor of homeland security at Colorado Technical University, has a suggestion for victims of police violence searching for someone to blame: Look in the mirror.

I...
Rob Duke's insight:

A misleading headline.  Dutta might want to rethink the way he explains this concept.  While I agree, it's a simple request to comply on the scene and then go to the station and complain; the other side also has a legitimate complaint that nothing changes with that approach (as we saw under Jim Crow through the civil rights era and even until today); and, furthermore, it's a slippery slope to merely comply because the government tells you to do so.  Is there a solution?  Officers have some reasonable expectation to safety and citizens have a reasonable expectation to have an authentic way to challenge police actions.  Without proof of the circumstances, it becomes a case of dueling perceptions.  Did the officer have the requisite alchemy of sometimes nebulous ingredients sufficient to satisfy the demands of reasonable suspicion and/or probable cause?  It depends on the circumstances, time, place, manner of the activity, even the training and experience of the officer factors in.  Frankly, no citizen is ever going to have all this info (or be qualified to evaluate), nor is it reasonable for us to ask officers to delay officer safety concerns (e.g. pat down searches for weapons, warrant checks, etc.) long enough to satisfy a citizen that a stop is based upon legitimate probable cause and not racial profiling--nor could we expect there to be agreement under the stress and emotion of the real-time detention.  Given these circumstances, I propose one not-so-novel solution; and one solution not generally under discussion.  First the not-so-novel solution: 1. Improve evidence gathering and storage through the use of recording devices: belt recorders, livescribe pens, body cameras (where available), vehicle cameras.  Furthermore, a system to routinize the collection and preservation of this evidence needs to be designed, built and funded, so that all agencies/communities, regardless of fiscal resources, can be protected equally. Now, for the novel solution: 2. Engage in a three-part approach to dispute resolution and restoration: Part I: enlist experts (each community has candidates possessing skills or who can be trained) familiar with community visioning and team building to create dialogue and design systems to begin removing saddle burrs, extracting thorns, dislodging the wedges of discontent in communities.  These issues include not just problems associated with what Muir calls the "Power of the Sword"--though coercive power is certainly the most visible police problem--but we must also pay particular attention to the "Power of the Purse", the under-investment in communities that sustains the need and existence of underground economies based upon contraband and vice, and, the "Power of the Word", that enables all sorts of verbal and political dirty dealings (rent-seeking behaviors) to mask inequities and impotent attempts to remedy the myriad of problems that lie at the root of any major community disgruntlement.  We're foolish to think that, Ferguson, Los Angeles, Chicago, etc. are experiencing unrest only because the cops are engaging in racial profiling.  Dispute Resolution only works if we blast the problem with sunshine so that all problems are addressed on something resembling equal footing, whether these be problems of the sword, the word, or the purse.  Part II: capacity must be built so that everyone has access to Dispute Resolution systems.  This means that we need to find funding for system design and mediation centers that can resolve problems in real time--not the years civil and criminal courts often need to process cases (though courts are, of course, still needed for serious cases and as the appellate process for more informal programs of dispute resolution).  We can't expect ADR to work if we don't design, implement, fund, evaluate, tweek, and perform expert analysis to improve theoretical understandings of what works and what doesn't.  Part III: community leaders, including the cops, must be trained in Dispute System Design and Alternative Dispute Resolution techniques.  It's not enough to find a vision and restore goodwill (Part I), nor develop a plan to capture the promise of good intentions as concrete goods to be shared by all (Part II), we must also teach people, encourage them, and provide time, public spaces, private meeting spaces, and other resources to actually embrace the concept of restoring their communities through dispute resolution.

As always, please share your comments and ideas.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, August 21, 8:06 AM

A misleading headline.  Dutta might want to rethink the way he explains this concept.  While I agree, it's a simple request to comply on the scene and then go to the station and complain; the other side also has a legitimate complaint that nothing changes with that approach (as we saw under Jim Crow through the civil rights era and even until today); and, furthermore, it's a slippery slope to merely comply because the government tells you to do so.  Is there a solution?  Officers have some reasonable expectation to safety and citizens have a reasonable expectation to have an authentic way to challenge police actions.  Without proof of the circumstances, it becomes a case of dueling perceptions.  Did the officer have the requisite alchemy of sometimes nebulous ingredients sufficient to satisfy the demands of reasonable suspicion and/or probable cause?  It depends on the circumstances, time, place, manner of the activity, even the training and experience of the officer factors in.  Frankly, no citizen is ever going to have all this info (or be qualified to evaluate), nor is it reasonable for us to ask officers to delay officer safety concerns (e.g. pat down searches for weapons, warrant checks, etc.) long enough to satisfy a citizen that a stop is based upon legitimate probable cause and not racial profiling--nor could we expect there to be agreement under the stress and emotion of the real-time detention.  Given these circumstances, I propose one not-so-novel solution; and one solution not generally under discussion.  First the not-so-novel solution: 1. Improve evidence gathering and storage through the use of recording devices: belt recorders, livescribe pens, body cameras (where available), vehicle cameras.  Furthermore, a system to routinize the collection and preservation of this evidence needs to be designed, built and funded, so that all agencies/communities, regardless of fiscal resources, can be protected equally. Now, for the novel solution: 2. Engage in a three-part approach to dispute resolution and restoration: Part I: enlist experts (each community has candidates possessing skills or who can be trained) familiar with community visioning and team building to create dialogue and design systems to begin removing saddle burrs, extracting thorns, dislodging the wedges of discontent in communities.  These issues include not just problems associated with what Muir calls the "Power of the Sword"--though coercive power is certainly the most visible police problem--but we must also pay particular attention to the "Power of the Purse", the under-investment in communities that sustains the need and existence of underground economies based upon contraband and vice, and, the "Power of the Word", that enables all sorts of verbal and political dirty dealings (rent-seeking behaviors) to mask inequities and impotent attempts to remedy the myriad of problems that lie at the root of any major community disgruntlement.  We're foolish to think that, Ferguson, Los Angeles, Chicago, etc. are experiencing unrest only because the cops are engaging in racial profiling.  Dispute Resolution only works if we blast the problem with sunshine so that all problems are addressed on something resembling equal footing, whether these be problems of the sword, the word, or the purse.  Part II: capacity must be built so that everyone has access to Dispute Resolution systems.  This means that we need to find funding for system design and mediation centers that can resolve problems in real time--not the years civil and criminal courts often need to process cases (though courts are, of course, still needed for serious cases and as the appellate process for more informal programs of dispute resolution).  We can't expect ADR to work if we don't design, implement, fund, evaluate, tweek, and perform expert analysis to improve theoretical understandings of what works and what doesn't.  Part III: community leaders, including the cops, must be trained in Dispute System Design and Alternative Dispute Resolution techniques.  It's not enough to find a vision and restore goodwill (Part I), nor develop a plan to capture the promise of good intentions as concrete goods to be shared by all (Part II), we must also teach people, encourage them, and provide time, public spaces, private meeting spaces, and other resources to actually embrace the concept of restoring their communities through dispute resolution.

As always, please share your comments and ideas.

 

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What Happens When Inmates Design Their Own Prisons?

What Happens When Inmates Design Their Own Prisons? | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
A restorative justice workshop in San Francisco allowed inmates to reimagine the design of their physical environment.
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A hot year ahead

A hot year ahead | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
SPANIARDS call a chat between two people unwilling to listen to each other a conversation between besugos—the grimacing, pop-eyed sea bream. The description often...
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Conflict Resolution Therapy With The Stars Of The Expendables 3 - YouTube

Get tickets & showtimes: regmovi.es/1r7Gxxz The Expendables are back! In the third movie in the Expendables franchise, the team adds some fresh team members ...
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A little fun with conflict resolution...

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12 Toxic Behaviors that Push People Away From You

12 Toxic Behaviors that Push People Away From You | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Practical Tips for Productive Living
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Research findings on diversity and international arbitration | odr.info

Research findings on diversity and international arbitration | odr.info | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
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Patrick Writes a Letter to Market Basket CEOs

Patrick Writes a Letter to Market Basket CEOs | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
In the letter, Gov. Deval Patrick offered to lend a hand to solve the dispute that has left supermarket shelves empty and many employees without paychecks.
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In memoriam: Warren Bennis, 89

In memoriam: Warren Bennis, 89 | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
He was a visionary whose contributions to business shaped the concept of leadership, says USC President C. L. Max Nikias.
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Tentative agreement reached in Enstar labor dispute

Tentative agreement reached in Enstar labor dispute | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
A tentative agreement between the natural gas utility and the United Association of Plumbers and Steamfitters would avert a threatened strike, although it still needs to be approved by union members.
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Big Business Launches a New Attack On Whistle Blowers

Big Business Launches a New Attack On Whistle Blowers | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Sen. Charles Grassley from Iowa is battling the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which wants to weaken the Federal Claims Act.
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Time Warner Agrees to Arbitration in Dodgers TV Dispute

Time Warner Agrees to Arbitration in Dodgers TV Dispute | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Time Warner Cable announced Monday night that it would agree to binding arbitration to resolve a dispute with other local pay-TV providers.
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Dodgers support binding arbitration to solve distribution of SportsNet LA

Dodgers support binding arbitration to solve distribution of SportsNet LA | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
By Jon Weisman On behalf of the Dodgers, team president and CEO Stan Kasten spoke tonight in favor of a proposal from a group of six California-based members of the U.S. House of Representatives, l...
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When Fighting with Your Boss, Protect Yourself First

When Fighting with Your Boss, Protect Yourself First | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Make sure you’re prepared for the fallout.
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Why Marketers Want to Make You Cry

Why Marketers Want to Make You Cry | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
How P&G, Coca-Cola, and Apple harness the power of emotional storytelling.
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Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour

Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Even the most strained relationships can be repaired.
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Leadership Ethics: It Doesn't Depend | Switch and Shift

Leadership Ethics: It Doesn't Depend | Switch and Shift | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Imagine recent outcomes at GM, and Toyota before it, if some frontline engineer – or even assembly line worker – used the company Intranet to say "Hey, CEO,
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Bringing down the NCAA's house

Bringing down the NCAA's house | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
A FEDERAL judge in California has likely put the amateurism rules that govern American college sport on a path to destruction. On August 8th judge Claudia Wilken...
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The Remarkable Legacy of Warren Bennis

The Remarkable Legacy of Warren Bennis | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
ust as Peter Drucker was "the father of management," Warren Bennis will be remembered as "the father of leadership." It was Warren who first said leadership is not a set of genetic characteristics, but rather the result of the lif...
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Recap: Preparing for Microagressions in the Workplace

Recap: Preparing for Microagressions in the Workplace | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
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An excellent method for dealing with these type of problems is with Social Justice Mediation (search Leah Wing at UMass Amherst for more info).

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TODAY: Monkey selfie drives copyright lawyers bananas

TODAY: Monkey selfie drives copyright lawyers bananas | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Video on Today: A selfie photo taken by a monkey has sparked a curious debate over who holds the copyright of the photo or whether it falls into public domain. NBC’s Keir Simmons reports.
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And, now, for something completely different...

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Decluttering the company

Decluttering the company | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
PETER DRUCKER once observed that, “Much of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to work.” Nine years after the management guru’s...
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Anchorage Assembly to debate compromise on labor law Tuesday

Anchorage Assembly to debate compromise on labor law Tuesday | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
A proposal spearheaded by Anchorage Assembly member Jennifer Johnston to hammer out a compromise on the municipality’s controversial labor law may be voted on at the Tuesday Assembly meeting. 
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Why Taco Bell Likes to Call Its Workers 'Champions'

Why Taco Bell Likes to Call Its Workers 'Champions' | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The perils of corporate euphemisms
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Dealing with workplace bullies - The Boston Globe

Dealing with workplace bullies - The Boston Globe | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The problem is tangled by workers’ fears of retribution, lack of legal protections, and concerns about deciding what constitutes abusive behavior, victims say.
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Design Offices to Be More Like Neighborhoods

Design Offices to Be More Like Neighborhoods | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
To reform conference room wastelands, think like an urban planner.
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