Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
5.2K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Scoop.it!

Investor says may appeal lost arbitration against Goldman - Reuters

Investor says may appeal lost arbitration against Goldman - Reuters | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Thomson Reuters News & Insight Investor says may appeal lost arbitration against Goldman Reuters Richard Caruso, who launched Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corp in 1989, filed an arbitration case against the Wall Street firm in 2009, alleging...
more...
No comment yet.
Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Expanding the critical perspective of justice to suggest restorative processes and ADR as tools for reparation.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Transect of incremental urbanism

Transect of incremental urbanism | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
When you have a chicken and egg problem, have a chicken omelette.
Rob Duke's insight:
Does the built-space influence crime?  Look at Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

AFN notebook: Native VPSO sergeant talks of life and values; Zinke promises Trump will work with Alaska Native tribes

AFN handed out its top two awards for outstanding contributions to Alaska Native people and causes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Senator Coghill plans big changes for controversial crime bill SB 91

Senator Coghill plans big changes for controversial crime bill SB 91 | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Senate Bill 91 created a political war between members of the law enforcement community and those who wanted criminal justice reform.
The bill was aimed at reducing prison spending and letting first time offenders forgo jail time for treatment.
For some, like recovering addict Vinnie Blue, the program was a success.


"I run into people regularly that say, 'oh that SB 91 isn't working,'" Blue said. "Well, it worked for me, and if it can work for a person a like me, it can work for anyone if they put their mind to it."

A sponsor of the bill, state Sen. John Coghill, says with SB 91 he wanted to get the most out of each dollar while enhancing public safety but also stopping practices that don't reduce crime or recidivism.
He says he realizes not every policy worked, so he used feedback from law enforcement, prosecutors and the public, then sponsored a second bill, SB 54, to address some of their issues.

"So what we tried to do in Senate Bill 91 was give more tools," Coghill said. "And obviously Senate Bill 54 says some of those tools didn't work, so we have to do better. We are willing to do that."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Calling it another three-strikes law, Gov. Brown vetoes bill proposed in wake of Whittier police officer’s death

Calling it another three-strikes law, Gov. Brown vetoes bill proposed in wake of Whittier police officer’s death | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Gov. Jerry Brown over the weekend vetoed a bill written in response to the killing of Whittier police Officer Keith Boyer, saying it was too reminiscent of the state’s abandoned three-strikes law.

The bill, penned by Assemblyman Ian Calderon, D-Whittier, would have required jailing probationers who violate the terms of their supervision at least three times.

The suspect in Boyer’s killing, Michael Christopher Mejia, was on probation Feb. 20 the day police believe he crashed a stolen vehicle on Colima Road, then engaged in a shootout with Boyer and Officer Patrick Hazell, who survived. Mejia is now awaiting trial on murder charges.

Mejia cycled in and out of county jail in the months before the shooting after repeatedly violating the terms of his probation, according to police.

Anti-three strikes

“Three strikes” often refers to the law California voters overwhelmingly approved in 1994 ballot as Prop. 184. It required individuals previously convicted of serious felonies to be sentenced to longer prison terms.

Under Prop. 184, a third conviction often resulted in a sentence of 25 years to life. Voters amended the law in 2012 to allow for lighter sentences if the third conviction was for a less serious or nonviolent felony.

“I do not agree with a three-strikes-and-you’re-out approach is the correct solution,” Brown said in his veto message. “This would undermine the sound discretion of local probation authorities, who by training and sworn responsibility, are in the best position to make determinations on what types of sanctions or punishment should be imposed.”

Calderon’s bill, A.B. 1408, also would have required the Board of Parole Hearings to consider inmates’ entire criminal history, not just the most recent offense, when considering them for release from prison. Under current law, the board may consider the entire criminal history of an inmate prior to granting parole, but they are not required to.

The risk of unintended results

In vetoing the bill, Brown acknowledged it was written in sincerity “as a response to the senseless and horrifying murder of a Whittier police officer, an event that shocked and saddened our entire state.”
Rob Duke's insight:
Did Gov. Brown make a correct analogy?  Is treating a 3-time parole violator to serious penalty, the same as sending someone to jail for 25 years for a "minor" felony (grand theft) just because that's the 3rd strike?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Bellflower launches teen court program for juvenile offenders

Bellflower launches teen court program for juvenile offenders | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Bellflower High sophomores Ashley San Pedro Ramirez (left) and Fernando
Ruiz speak with Teen Court coordinator Susan Nicoletti before for their
first Teen Court on Oct. 5.

BELLFLOWER – More than 100 Bellflower High School students, District
administrators, city officials and law professiona
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

2-year-old denied kidney transplant because father violated probation

2-year-old denied kidney transplant because father violated probation | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
A.J. Burgess was born a month too soon without a working kidney, WGCL-TV reports, and his father Anthony Dickerson is a 110 percent match for an organ donation. But surgeons at Emory Hospital in Atlanta won't perform the operation because Dickerson served time in prison for violating probation.

Air pollution may damage kidneys, new study finds
Single mom with 2 failing kidneys saved by stranger
Burgess, who only weighs 25 pounds at age 2, spent 10 months in a neonatal intensive care unit. Dickerson was tested and proved to be the perfect match to give his son a kidney, WGCL-TV writes.

"He made it his business to say, 'Once I get out, I'm gonna promise to my son that he can get a kidney," A.J.'s mother Carmella said.

As soon as Dickerson was released from prison, he was about to go through the steps to donate his kidney on Oct. 3. However, he returned to jail for violating his parole again for possession of a firearm or knife during the commission of or attempt to commit certain felonies, according to WGCL-TV.

It was at that point everything changed for the family and Carmella said that the hospital needed three to four months before the child's father could donate his kidney.
Rob Duke's insight:
Therapeutic Jurisprudence asks that justice do nothing more than the Hippocratic Oath asks of doctors: "first, do no harm."

See Dave Wexler's work at Univ. of Puerto Rico.
more...
Devin Ryan Johnson's comment, October 16, 2:16 PM
This is the saddest and most ridiculous thing that I have read all week. No one should be denied the right to save another life especially a kid based off a factor like this. This kid could never find a match and his Father who is a 110% match was denied because of a probation violation.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Massachusetts criminal justice bill still ‘work in progress’

Massachusetts criminal justice bill still ‘work in progress’ | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
–Pat Greenhouse / The Boston Globe
By STEVE LeBLANC AP, October 14, 2017
BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts lawmakers are in the throes of a major debate about potential changes to the state’s criminal justice system.

Democratic leaders in the Senate have already floated a wide-ranging bill.

Besides eliminating mandatory minimum sentences for some drug offenses while increasing penalties for others, the proposal calls for a reduction in court fees charged to low-income defendants, changes in solitary confinement procedures in state prisons and an overhaul of the state’s bail system.


Supporters of the proposal including Judiciary Committee co-chair Sen. William Brownsberger, a Belmont Democrat, who said the goal of the legislation is to offer alternatives to incarceration for some while helping former convicts avoid returning to prison for new crimes.
Rob Duke's insight:
States to watch when it comes to legal reform: Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Texas, and California....From Mitt Romney's health care plan that became the blue print for Obamacare to increased scrutiny for stop-n-frisk, you usually hear it first from on of these 5 states.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Gov. Brown Signs Bill Allowing Felons To Vote In Jail

Gov. Brown Signs Bill Allowing Felons To Vote In Jail | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
AB2466 stems from California’s criminal justice realignment, which led to some people convicted of low-level felonies serving time in county jails.

Republican lawmakers say felons should not be allowed to cast ballots while serving a sentence, with Sen. Patricia Bates of Laguna Niguel saying it compromises the integrity of elections.

Democratic Assemblywoman Shirley Weber of San Diego says opponents don’t want to allow certain people to vote. She says civic participation can be a critical part of reducing recidivism.
more...
Devin Ryan Johnson's comment, October 16, 2:24 PM
I believe that this is a good idea being that whoever is in office affects them as well. But, I also think that this should be limited to local and state elections. This could also act as an incentive to inmates, given them something else to work towards. One of the most important things that we must come to understand as a nation is that, not everyone in jail or prison is a bad person some of them just made a bad mistake
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

To End Mass Incarceration, We Must Rethink How We Respond to Violence

To End Mass Incarceration, We Must Rethink How We Respond to Violence | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Using restorative justice techniques as an alternative to prison has a surprising group of supporters: victims of violence
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Low-level offenders may be diverted from prosecution, into counseling

About 1,500 people accused of low-level crimes in Ventura County may be diverted from prosecution each year under a program announced this week.
more...
Devin Ryan Johnson's comment, October 16, 2:30 PM
It seems like California is leading the way when it comes to restorative justice. Thing like this is what communities are looking for, they want to be given a second chance. If a 16-year-old goes out and commits a misdemeanor, and it goes on their record then it could hurt them for the rest of their life. But, if they are given a second chance and complete the courses successfully and never returns to the justice system, then the justice system did its job.
Rob Duke's comment, October 16, 3:10 PM
...and Colorado, but Alaska is making progress, too.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A massive review of the evidence shows letting people out of prison doesn’t increase crime

A massive review of the evidence shows letting people out of prison doesn’t increase crime | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
This is very good news for supporters of criminal justice reform, but it comes with some caveats.
more...
J Hovis's comment, October 8, 6:29 PM
Loved this article! It was dense in the amount of subjects to discuss and evaluate. Perhaps my favorite statement was “[B]uilding and filling prisons is not making people safer,” Roodman wrote. “It may even be endangering the public. In that case, the cost-benefit case for decarceration is a no-brainer: all benefit and no cost.” I think and feel that so often some people's response to incarceration is it makes a community safer. The lock-them-up and throw away the key mentality. To me, avoidance is soooo much easier than forgiveness and acknowledgment, two concepts present in restorative justice as well as offenders reentering the community population. If advocates of RJ are able to introduce and convince the broader public of this very real fact then RJ can gain even more social acceptance among the public, and especially voters. The end of the article discussing the quality of research present is also very important. Methodology needs to be as air-tight as possible, there are no doubt pundits and monetary interests that will collide with any research on the benefits of decarceration and rJ.
Rob Duke's comment, October 12, 2:18 AM
I agree it was pretty balanced. About the best we can do with prisons (U.S. style) is incapacitate people for a while, but they'll reoffend if all we do is warehouse them. Meaningful change takes additional effort.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Koan: The Thief Who Became a Disciple

Koan: The Thief Who Became a Disciple | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
One evening as Shichiri Kojun was reciting sutras a thief with a sharp sword entered, demanding wither his money or his life.

Shichiri told him: “Do not disturb me. You can find the money in that drawer.” Then he resumed his recitation.

A little while afterwards he stopped and called: “Don’t take it all. I need some to pay taxes with tomorrow.”

The intruder gathered up most of the money and started to leave. “Thank a person when you receive a gift,” Shichiri added. The man thanked him and made off.

A few days afterwards the fellow was caught and confessed, among others, the offense against Shichiri. When Shichiri was called as a witness he said: “This man is no thief, at least as far as I am concerned. I gave him the money and he thanked me for it.”

After he had finished his prison term, the man went to Shichiri and became his disciple.
Rob Duke's insight:
The power of forgiveness...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of Saying Nice Things About Your Colleagues

The Benefits of Saying Nice Things About Your Colleagues | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it

Dave Wheeler for HBR
Whether we realize it or not, we are constantly given small opportunities to build up or put down our coworkers in the ways we talk about them. When we introduce two colleagues, tell a story about how a meeting went, or share a colleague’s work, how we “narrate others” can make a big difference in how they feel about themselves and their work.

Research shows that the stories we hear from others that highlight our unique contributions can help us find purpose in our relationships with our colleagues and our work. When someone mentions your work in an email and calls you “supertalented,” or talks about your unique strength of connecting with customers, you’re more likely to feel that your work has meaning. (And you can probably recall a few times that a colleague put you down as well, and used a narrative about you to undermine, stereotype, or devalue you.)

So how can we take advantage of the opportunities to narrate our colleagues in ways that cultivate positive self-meaning? Here are four opportunities to consider, along with examples from our research.

Create positive first impressions. We know first impressions matter, so use introductions as a way to positively narrate your colleagues. Be imaginative and share details that highlight the ways in which the person is interesting, and describe them as someone others would want to get to know. This is especially important when you’re introducing a new hire to your team.

Consider “Midori,” a newly appointed marketing manager for a midsize family-owned firm. She went through an intensive interview process with several layers of management during the hiring process. Before she arrived for her first day, her new boss sent out an email to introduce her, highlighting the knowledge and strengths she was bringing to the firm. When she arrived at the office, she noticed that her picture was already hanging as part of the gallery in the lobby, along with personal information like her hometown, favorite food, and an inspiring quote. She now understood why they had asked her unusual questions about some of her likes and dislikes during the interview process. On her very first day (when she had been in the building for just a few hours), Midori had been narrated by others, through email and picture displays, in ways that were welcoming and psychologically strengthening. She was described in high regard, which jumpstarted her transition into the organization’s social fabric.


Communicate the value that each team member brings to the table. Teams function better when they share information effectively. One of us (Julia) found that sharing personal stories that affirm a person’s unique strengths and contributions before they join the team improved the group’s ability to exchange information. So when you bring together a new team, tell stories about each person’s potential contributions to the group.

This is what “Rashad” did. He was assembling a project team to develop a new innovation center. The first time the team met, he went around the room introducing each member and describing the strengths each brought to the group. He also explained why each person was uniquely qualified to help the team meet its objectives, peppering in fun facts about people’s backgrounds and interests. This piqued other members’ curiosity, fostering a desire to connect. Then everyone took turns sharing what excited them most about being on this team. The way Rashad narrated each person communicated respect and the value of their worth, which created a collective sense of purpose that motivated the team to perform well.

Describe your colleagues positively if they are socially undermined. Sometimes we observe a colleague being socially undermined. Perhaps they are being interrupted or silenced, either intentionally or not. When someone is put down by others, or is fighting to be heard, we have the opportunity to build them up by talking about them positively.

Take “Sasha” and “Svetlana” They were both recently hired as senior managers to join the new task force at a construction company that was predominantly male. As two of the only women, their ideas and perspectives in strategy meetings were rarely acknowledged. They decided to publicly support each other and others whose voices were often not heard. For example, when Svetlana proposed a new plan to reduce costs, Sasha followed up by repeating and elaborating on Svetlana’s idea, giving full credit to Svetlana. When Sasha seemed hesitant to voice her concerns, Svetlana pointed out Sasha’s expertise in engineering and publicly recognized how much her expertise was needed by the group. These actions shifted the way each manager saw themselves, while also acknowledging and valuing Sasha and Svetlana’s input.

Use endings and exits to craft a positive portrait of colleagues. Coworkers retire or leave for other jobs. People are laid off. Whether it was their choice or not, use a colleague’s exit to create meaning for someone.

When the funding ran out at the nonprofit health care organization where “Sipho” had worked as a grant manager for the past five years, he found out that his current position would be terminated in a month. Sipho felt hurt and disconnected from his colleagues. Understanding the tough situation he was in, his colleagues put together a box filled with pictures and notes reflecting on their positive memories of working with him. They talked about how special and valuable Sipho had been. Not only did this ritual express appreciation, but it was also a potent form of positive narration at a time when Sipho really needed it. They also reached out to their contacts outside of the nonprofit who were looking to hire a new grant manager and explained Sipho’s contributions to the mission of their organization. This incident changed the way that the organization viewed exits and layoffs, as employees saw endings as a positive opportunity to do good for others.

Every day we have opportunities to help others create positive meaning in how we communicate about our colleagues. It’s worth it to stay aware of these moments and take advantage them. Not only do we uplift others but we also lift up our own potential for meaning by positively contributing to others.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Scientists Reveal A Technique That Could Help You Control Your Dreams

Scientists Reveal A Technique That Could Help You Control Your Dreams | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Enhance your lucid dreaming experience.
Rob Duke's insight:
The power of dreams as a new therapy?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Alaska tribes and state sign historic document on tribal child welfare

The agreement formalized Thursday in Anchorage on the opening day of the Alaska Federation of Natives annual convention allows expanded tribal authority.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Pittsburgh Teacher Dragged From Car, Seriously Beaten By Student's Parents, For Disciplining Student - Blue Lives Matter

Pittsburgh Teacher Dragged From Car, Seriously Beaten By Student's Parents, For Disciplining Student - Blue Lives Matter | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
A Pittsburgh teacher was followed and assaulted by the parents of a student, after taking a cell phone away from her in class on Wednesday.
Rob Duke's insight:
Hard to see this happening with RJ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Returning Inmates Need ‘A Place to Call Home:’ Study

Returning Inmates Need ‘A Place to Call Home:’ Study | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Safe and affordable housing for formerly incarcerated individuals is essential to breaking the cycle of homelessness and recidivism that prevents them from rebuilding their lives as productive citizens, according to a report released Tuesday by the Prisoner Reentry Institute at John Jay College.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Cops worked to release jailed father for kidney donation to son

Cops worked to release jailed father for kidney donation to son | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Two weeks after a Gwinnett County man was told his recent arrest would push back his kidney donation for his 2-year-old son until next year, law enforcement officials are saying they had nothing to do with the decision to delay the surgery.

Already on probation due to a lengthy history of theft and forgery charges, Anthony Dickerson was arrested again Sept. 28 on charges of fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer and possession of a firearm or knife during the commission of attempted felonies.

But according to the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office, Dickerson’s recent arrest and criminal history aren’t what stalled Emory University Hospital’s surgery plan for his son Anthony Jr.  

“Our staff worked diligently with court personnel and the District Attorney’s Office to make arrangements for Mr. (Anthony) Dickerson’s early release so that he could follow through on his scheduled kidney donation for his young son, AJ,” Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Deputy Shannon Volkodav said.  

Dickerson was released from jail Oct. 2, in time for his surgery set for Oct. 3.

A judge even reduced Dickerson’s total bonds from $2,600 to $2,000, Volkodav said.

“We wish this family well in their pursuit of medical assistance for their son and hope that little AJ is soon enjoying good health,” Volkodav said.

In a letter the AJC obtained from the child’s mother, Carmellia Burgess, a hospital official said the surgery would be pushed back until Dickerson could provide evidence he has complied with his parole officer for three months.
“We will re-evaluate Mr. Dickerson in January 2018 after receipt of this completed documentation,” the hospital representative said in the letter.

Janet Christenbury, an Emory spokeswoman, said in a statement Friday the hospital is committed to the highest quality of care for its patients. 

“Guidelines for organ transplantation are designed to maximize the chance of success for organ recipients and minimize risk for living donors,” Christenbury said. “Because of privacy regulations and respect for patient confidentiality, we cannot share specific information about our patients.”
more...
Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, October 16, 3:40 PM

  • Lord God thank you

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Magic Mushrooms "Reboot" The Brains Of Depressed Patients, New Study

Magic Mushrooms "Reboot" The Brains Of Depressed Patients, New Study | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Patients taking psilocybin (a compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms) to treat depression show reduced symptoms weeks after treatment following a ‘reset’ of their brain activity.



The findings come from a study in which researchers from Imperial College London used psilocybin – the psychoactive compound that occurs naturally in magic mushrooms – to treat a small number of patients with depression in whom conventional treatment had failed.

In a paper, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, the researchers describe patient-reported benefits lasting up to five weeks after treatment, and believe the psychedelic compound may effectively reset the activity of key brain circuits known to play a role in depression.


Whole-brain cerebral blood flow maps for baseline versus one-day post-treatment, plus the differencemap (cluster-corrected, p < 0.05, n = 16). Correlation chart shows post-Treatment changes in bilateral amygdalaCBF versus changes in depressive symptoms (r = 0.59, p = 0.01). One patient failed to completed the scan 2QIDS-SR16 rating, reducing the sample size to n = 15 for the correlation analysis. In all of the images, the left ofthe brain is shown on the left. Credit: Carhart Harris, R et al. Scientific Reports 2017
Comparison of images of patients’ brains before and one day after they received the drug treatment revealed changes in brain activity that were associated with marked and lasting reductions in depressive symptoms.

The authors note that while the initial results of the experimental therapy are exciting, they are limited by the small sample size as well as the absence of a control group – such as a placebo group – to directly contrast with the patients.

Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, Head of Psychedelic Research at Imperial, who led the study, said: “We have shown for the first time clear changes in brain activity in depressed people treated with psilocybin after failing to respond to conventional treatments.

“Several of our patients described feeling ‘reset’ after the treatment and often used computer analogies. For example, one said he felt like his brain had been ‘defragged’ like a computer hard drive, and another said he felt ‘rebooted’. Psilocybin may be giving these individuals the temporary ‘kick start’ they need to break out of their depressive states and these imaging results do tentatively support a ‘reset’ analogy. Similar brain effects to these have been seen with electroconvulsive therapy.”



Over the last decade or so, a number of clinical trials have been conducted into the safety and effectiveness of psychedelics in patients with conditions such as depression and addictions, yielding promising results.

In the recent Imperial trial, the first with psilocybin in depression, 20 patients with treatment-resistant form of the disorder were given two doses of psilocybin (10 mg and 25 mg), with the second dose a week after the first.

Nineteen of these underwent initial brain imaging and then a second scan one day after the high dose treatment. Carhart-Harris and team used two main brain imaging methods to measure changes in blood flow and the crosstalk between brain regions, with patients reporting their depressive symptoms through completing clinical questionnaires.

Immediately following treatment with psilocybin, patients reported a decrease in depressive symptoms – corresponding with anecdotal reports of an ‘after-glow’ effect characterised by improvements in mood and stress relief.

Functional MRI imaging revealed reduced blood flow in areas of the brain, including the amygdala, a small, almond-shaped region of the brain known to be involved in processing emotional responses, stress and fear. They also found increased stability in another brain network, previously linked to psilocybin’s immediate effects as well as to depression itself.

These findings provide a new window into what happens in the brains of people after they have ‘come down’ from a psychedelic, where an initial disintegration of brain networks during the drug ‘trip’, is followed by a re-integration afterwards.

Dr Carhart-Harris explained: “Through collecting these imaging data we have been able to provide a window into the after effects of psilocybin treatment in the brains of patients with chronic depression. Based on what we know from various brain imaging studies with psychedelics, as well as taking heed of what people say about their experiences, it may be that psychedelics do indeed ‘reset’ the brain networks associated with depression, effectively enabling them to be lifted from the depressed state.

The authors warn that while the initial findings are encouraging, the research is at an early stage and that patients with depression should not attempt to self-medicate, as the team provided a special therapeutic context for the drug experience and things may go awry if the extensive psychological component of the treatment is neglected. They add that future studies will include more robust designs and currently plan to test psilocybin against a leading antidepressant in a trial set to start early next year.
Rob Duke's insight:
More proof that thinking, actions, and moods are more than fully dependent on rational choice....

What are the implications for justice?

We know that rats exposed to lead are more violent; and inner cities are more likely to be heavy-metal brown fields from which corporations fled before having to ante up big dollars to attempt clean up.  So what if chemical and metals exposure was at least partly responsible for criminal behavior?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

3 Causes of Low Self-Esteem in Teens (And What to Do About It) - Stop Medicine Abuse

3 Causes of Low Self-Esteem in Teens (And What to Do About It) - Stop Medicine Abuse | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Kristine Tye discusses three of the main contributors to low self-esteem in teens, along with tips for parents to help with each challenge.
Rob Duke's insight:
Mediators are part therapists, but don't diagnose as much as play 20 questions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Davis Forum on Police Oversight & Restorative Justice (Davis, California)-Oct. 9, 2017 | RJI

Davis Forum on Police Oversight & Restorative Justice (Davis, California)-Oct. 9, 2017 | RJI | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
RJI was pleased to participate in the Davis Forum on Police Oversight and Restorative Justice. Lisa Rea, President, of Restorative Justice International (RJI) represented the global association. The community forum was sponsored by the Davis Vanguard and the Davis Phoenix Coalition. Participants included Darren Pytel, City of Davis Chief of Police, Shelby Moffatt, Sacramento State University faculty, Jann Garcia-Murray, community activist, Orit Kahlman, Yolo Conflict Resolution Center and Lisa Rea, RJI. The forum was moderated by David Greenwald of the Davis Vanguard.

Lisa Rea ‘s remarks during the Davis forum focused on her expertise with the use of restorative justice after violence, crime or conflict but also introduced the concept of Restorative Policing. The link to this story from the Davis Vanguard (October 12, 2017) includes RJI’s White Paper produced in 2016 and its Restorative Policing Webinar also released in 2016. The two-hour forum was spirited and expansive in nature with presentations from each panelist and questions from the community members present. There was great interest in the concept of restorative policing. RJI is hopeful that the seeds were planted in a way that can produce fruit in the future in the city of Davis.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Cops Get in on the Action as Guy Sets Up Loud Car Meet to Annoy his Neighbor

Cops Get in on the Action as Guy Sets Up Loud Car Meet to Annoy his Neighbor | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
https://www.facebook.com/carthrottle/videos/1803240729686969/
Rob Duke's insight:
Another great example of an opportunity for officers to mediate an ongoing dispute among/between neighbors.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Drunken shooter misses roosters, hits her neighbour

A Katikati woman accidentally shot her 15-year-old neighbour while drunkenly firing her air rifle at roosters on her property.
Rob Duke's insight:
This was a "no report: civil problem" dispositioned call several times before it got to a shooting.

Should we ask our officers to do more to mediate disputes?
more...
J Hovis's comment, October 8, 6:00 PM
Obviously there are multiple solutions that could have been offered to keep a dispute/occurrence like this from escalating; if there was intervention in one of the early occurrences, such as mediation, maybe this and future occurrences would be avoided completely. There are any numerous factors that could play in to this one specific situation, of course, but the shared responsibility of a community problem-solving is potentially so much more powerful than any set of factors. And, of course, officers are part of any community they serve. Absolutely, officers, when they have the ability, can help mediate disputes. When done fairly the positives are far reaching including instilling trust in both police and individuals.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Anti-Violence Strategies Boost Confidence in Cops: Study

Anti-Violence Strategies Boost Confidence in Cops: Study | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it

New York police officers. Photo by David Merrett via Flickr
Gun violence declined significantly in two New York City neighborhoods where community-based “interruptors” are deployed, and the confidence of at-risk young men in police also increased, according to a study released Monday.

The study, “Denormalizing Violence,” looked at data from two troubled neighborhoods in the Bronx and Brooklyn where the city had been implementing a strategy called “Cure Violence,” aimed at identifying and engaging persons believed most likely to be involved in . . .
more...
J Hovis's comment, October 8, 6:31 PM
I wasn't able to read this article without an additional subscription - was this the case for anyone else?