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Top 20 change management mistakes . . . & how to avoid them

Top 20 change management mistakes . . . & how to avoid them | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Many change efforts fail. They can be traced to these common mistakes: Top 20+ change management mistakes to avoid - Torben...

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Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice
Expanding the critical perspective of justice to suggest restorative processes and ADR as tools for reparation.
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The Four “I’s” of Every Transformational Leader

The Four “I’s” of Every Transformational Leader | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
For the first time after several years working in a big corporation I felt the presence of a real leader, not just another manager.

Via Anne Leong
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A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression

A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Episode #165
A Second Chance to Fix a Bad First Impression
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Thursday, April 30, 2015

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If you've put your worst foot forward the first time you meet someone, all is not lost. There's a way to shake awful first impressions. (TATSIANAMA/Shutterstock)
There’s nothing worse than walking away from a job interview or meeting someone for the first time and smashing the heel of your hand to forehead while crying out, “I really blew it!”

We’re constantly told how important it is to make a good first impression, but what happens if you had a bad day or made a flub while speaking or you just aren’t that warm of a person when people first meet you.Can you recover?

Heidi Grant Halvorson says, yes, you can get a chance at a second impression and wrote about how you can in an article for the Harvard Business Review (she’s so sure of it that she even has a new book on the subject No One Understands You and What To Do About It).

In an interview with Charlie Herman, host of Money Talking, Halvorson says one of the biggest issues in making a good impression is that we often think we know how we're coming off, but in truth, we have no idea what's going on in other people's minds when they meet us for the first time. That's why she says we need to ask trusted friends how people perceive us. And then we need to be intentional about how we interact with people around us.

(Listen above for the complete interview.)

First, she suggests empathy. Usually, she says, when we first meet, we're sizing each other up with two key questions:

Are you friend or foe?
Are you competent? That is, will you be a potentially powerful ally or enemy?
As we unconsciously answer these two questions, our brains are painting portraits of the people around us in the first moments we meet. And those pictures — often drawn in caricature — can be very hard to erase.

Because of our fears about making a good first impression, especially at work, Halvorson says our initial instincts are to try to come across as smart and competent. But she argues that in that first meeting, warmth is more important. The first impressions people have of us come from their guts, so it's not about how good you are at your job, yet. In a job interview, you'll get to prove that with your resume and your answers to questions. But before you exude confidence, you need to show people you'll be a team player and someone who's easy to manage. 

Halvorson says it's also important to be deliberate about what your body is doing: Smile when people smile at you, make eye contact, nod and affirm your colleagues' comments because it’s not just about what you say, but how you communicate non-verbally with other people. 

And if you do make a bad impression, she suggests two ways to turn it around:

The Long View: Over time, provide the people around you with consistent evidence that their first impression is wrong. For example, if you have a reputation for being late, be early for weeks on end, over and over. Arriving on time once or twice will seem like a fluke; being ready, right on time, every time, will get people to reassess their opinion about your timeliness.
Quick Fix: If you get the sense someone doesn't like you, ask to be assigned to that person. You'll have the chance to have that person rely on you for results. If you can deliver, you can expect they will change how they look at you.
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When It’s Safe to Rely on Intuition (and When It’s Not)

When It’s Safe to Rely on Intuition (and When It’s Not) | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
The types of problems that do not benefit from intuition are ones that have clear decision rules, objective criteria, and abundant data with which to perform an analysis. In making a medical diagnosis, for example, computer algorithms tend to be more accurate than an experienced medical doctor’s judgment.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. When you're an expert and there are certain artful skills that make intuition foundational in some way.

2. The type of decision is not one that relies on analysis.

3. When you must decide quickly.

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Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team

Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Myth #1: There is no place for emotion in the workplace. If you have humans in the workplace, you’re going to have emotions too. Ignoring, stifling, or invalidating them will only drive the toxic issues underground. This outdated notion is one reason people resort to passive-aggressive behavior: emotions will find their outlet, the choice is whether it’s out in the open or in the shadows.

Myth #2: We don’t have time to talk about people’s feelings. Do you have time for backroom dealings and subterfuge? Do you have time for re-opened decisions? Do you have time for failed implementations? Avoiding the emotional issues at the outset will only delay their impact. And when people don’t feel heard, their feelings amplify until you have something really destructive to deal with.

Myth #3: Emotions will skew our decision making. Emotions are already affecting your decision making. The choice is whether you want to be explicit about how (and how much) of a role they play or whether you want to leave them as unspoken biases.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. Spot it

2. Active Listening

3. Apply your resolving skills

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17 Action Steps to Take During Hard Times

17 Action Steps to Take During Hard Times | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
It’s one thing to have a bad day yet quite another to fall on hard times. These are the times that shape character and show what you’re made of.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 28, 9:07 AM

(From the article):  Make sure to learn from the experience. You may have to apply this lesson another day. One thing this teaches us is that life is filled with “ups and downs,” so make the most of the “in-betweens.”

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A five-step guide to not being stupid

Even the smartest people can be fools. David Robson explains how to avoid the most common traps of sloppy thinking.
Rob Duke's insight:

From the article:

1. Blind spots

2. Humble pie

3. Don't pull punches with yourself

4. Imagine "what if..."

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Why All Managers Must Be Leaders

Why All Managers Must Be Leaders | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Anyone within an organization has the potential to become a leader, but managers must be leaders. In schools and in our organizations we have been taught and conditioned to believe that managers and leaders are two separate people which is quite a harmful assumption. As a result we have managers [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Ivon Prefontaine
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Laura Saavedra's curator insight, April 19, 11:01 AM

I agree!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 24, 11:47 PM

The article echoes Peter Vaills work which suggests a concept called managerleader.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Ian Berry's curator insight, April 26, 12:23 AM

I like this. I see though (and my work with clients is about this) in many places a going much further than this. I think both leadership and management are every person's role. The biggest shift happening in remarkable workplaces and a necessity in the new world of work is that people management is a dead concept. See my definitions of leadership and management that have stood the test for two decades at http://www.ianberry.biz/tailored-leadership-mastery-programs/

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Are Bad Managers Holding Back Your Best Talent?

Are Bad Managers Holding Back Your Best Talent? | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
I am ashamed to admit it, but I followed her advice and, sure enough, the secretary was snatched up by a manager in another division. Evidently this kind of dysfunctional behavior is not uncommon; in Brazil there is even a term for it, “people trafficking.”
Rob Duke's insight:

The Peter Principle at work....

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The Leader You Don’t Like Doesn’t Like You Either

The Leader You Don’t Like Doesn’t Like You Either | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it

People don’t leave organizations, they leave people.


Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 21, 9:56 AM

This article hits the nail on the head on the main reason people leave organizations or are forced to leave. People don't leave organizations, they leave people.

 

(From the article): 

Choose to care. We like people who care for us. We don’t like people who don’t like us. It’s a choice to seek another’s best interests.Fixate on strengths more than weaknesses. It’s difficult to like someone when all you think about are their weaknesses.
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Becoming Powerful Makes You Less Empathetic

Becoming Powerful Makes You Less Empathetic | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
What can leaders do if they fear that they might be toeing the line where power turns to abuse of power? First, you must invite other people in. You must be willing to risk vulnerability and ask for feedback. A good executive coach can help you return to a state of empathy and value-driven decisions. However, be sure to ask for feedback from a wide variety of people. Dispense with the softball questions (How am I doing?) and ask the tough ones (How does my style and focus affect my employees?).
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Before You Respond to that Email, Pause

there are many times when we should not immediately reply.  And the truth is, we usually know them when they come. That’s what that initial pause is about. The key is to heed it.
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When Cultural Differences Interfere with Your Time

When Cultural Differences Interfere with Your Time | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Demanding cultural compliance — even from subordinates — can sometimes be dangerous because it can breed resentment and anger. To combat this, one of the best strategies for dealing with frustrations about time and other cultural differences, whether you’re in a position of power or not, is to suppress your need for an immediate fix to the problem and instead have patience. Many managers I’ve spoken to work on the relationship first over time. Only once they’ve established a strong working relationship do they start talking about how and why cultural differences are interfering with the work process. In other words, cultural compliance is the ultimate goal, but a strong, trusting relationship is the tool for achieving it.

In the end, cultural differences that interfere with the work you do can be tricky to manage. Smart managers realize this, and work on the relationship first before addressing the underlying cultural issues.
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These 5 Leadership Styles Have Never Worked for Anybody

These 5 Leadership Styles Have Never Worked for Anybody | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Some people are born leaders but most of us have to learn. It's easier if you skip the stuff proven not to work.

Via Anne Leong
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Labor relations agency seeks hearing on Fairbanks police contract dispute

Labor relations agency seeks hearing on Fairbanks police contract dispute | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
An Alaska Labor Relations Agency hearing officer has found "probable cause" that the city of Fairbanks bargained in bad faith with its police union last year when the city council approved a contract in August and reversed that decision in November.
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Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team

Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Start addressing your problem by creating a simple culture map using the eight scales. Plot out each culture on the eight dimensions and draw a line connecting all eight points.
Rob Duke's insight:

See the chart in the article.

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How to Respond When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work

How to Respond When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Do:

Give yourself time to calm down and assess the situation
Be clear about your contributions whenever you get an opportunity
Ask colleagues to mention your name when the idea or project comes up in conversation

Don’t:

Feel like you need to get credit for every single thing you do
Presume that the person had malicious intentions ­— credit stealing is often an accident
Make any accusations ­— instead ask the person questions to try to figure out why it happened
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Reinventing Performance Management

Reinventing Performance Management | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
How one company is rethinking peer feedback and the annual review, and trying to design a system to fuel improvement

Via Andrew Gerkens
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Andrew Gerkens's curator insight, April 28, 2:43 AM

A great article that looks at practical ways and a common mindset for supporting and improving performance. Regular 1:1 discussions (or check-ins) are included, with a great quote,

 'These check-ins are not in addition to the work of a team leader; they are the work of a team leader'

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Video: Adam Sandler's Producer To Native Actors: 'Sensitive? You Can Leave'

In an exclusive video obtained by Native actor, Goldie Tom, Native actors discuss their disappointment on the set of the Adam Sandler movie.
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Building trust: It's not a one-and-done deal

Building trust: It's not a one-and-done deal | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
What role does trust play in employee engagement? It’s a fairly large one, according to this Towers Watson research. The study cites leaders’ ability to

Via Anne Leong
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Assessment: Are People Likely to Misunderstand You?

Assessment: Are People Likely to Misunderstand You? | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Answer these questions to see how you compare with others.
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Is Wal-Mart closing stores for 'repairs,' or to punish activist workers?

Is Wal-Mart closing stores for 'repairs,' or to punish activist workers? | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
It's certainly possible that the reason Wal-Mart is temporarily closing five of its stores, including one in Pico Rivera is "ongoing plumbing issues that will require extensive repairs," as it claims.
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How To Be A Collaborative Leader

How To Be A Collaborative Leader | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it

There are seven different, important roles and responsibilities of collaborative leaders when leading teams, and those leaders should select the appropriate style to meet the team's needs.


Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 21, 10:02 AM

Are you a collaborative leader? Here are traits that make an effective collaborative leader. How many do you have in your leadership efforts?

 

(From the article): Within any collaborate workplace, leaders will find themselves fulfilling all seven of these roles at different times, and sometimes fulfilling a combination of the seven styles at the same time, while working with work groups and teams.

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How to Refocus a Meeting After Someone Interrupts

How to Refocus a Meeting After Someone Interrupts | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Whether it’s a team member who disagrees with your approach, an employee from another department who brings up irrelevant information, or a colleague who wants to use your meeting as a soapbox for his own personal agenda, dealing with interrupters during a meeting is challenging. “It’s the workplace equivalent of having someone steal the parking spot you were aiming for or jumping ahead of you in the line at the grocery store,” says Judith White, visiting associate professor at the Tuck School of Business. “When someone interrupts you, blocks you, or otherwise thwarts your intended action, it’s natural to feel upset,” she says. “This is a basic instinct and you will always have a flash of annoyance.” The key to successfully dealing with interrupters is to quash your frustration and instead “operate from a mindset of curiosity,”
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Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments

Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it

"Ever since I researched the meanings of monuments in the cultural landscape in Mexico City, I’ve been fascinated by the cultural politics of memory and heritage. The removal of a statue is a cultural 180, acknowledging what was once honored and revered is now something that is not worthy of that distinction. This sort of change is not without protests on both sides and a cultural rearticulation of who 'we' are when 'we' make a public memorial."


Via Seth Dixon
Rob Duke's insight:

There's a lesson here in the symbols of conflict resolution....what symbolic monuments do we have to move to solve social conflicts?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 14, 7:40 PM

Cecil Rhodes was the namesake for the Rhodes scholarship at Oxford University and the colonial names of Zambia (Northern Rhodesia) and Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia).  He was deeply connected to British colonialism and was one of the most ambitious colonizers that expanded the British Empire.  This week a statue of Cecil Rhodes on the University of Cape Town campus was removed.  See the BBC article, Yahoo News!, and PRI podcastfor more details


Questions to Ponder: Why do you think this monument to Cecil Rhodes was established in 1934?  Why was it removed in 2015?  What does this say about South African politics and culture?  How might we characterize the supporters and opponents of the statue?


Tags: South Africa, Africa, historical, colonialism, political, landscape.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, April 14, 7:52 PM

I have been to South Africa. The country is very still divided in many ways. My question is do our American students even know the history and geography of Africa? Do they know how the Europeans partitioned the continent ( divvied it up and laid claim to regions ) and that they did this across tribal lands to cause difficulty.

 

I understand the Rhodes scholarship, but it would be good for students and teachers to have ideationa scaffolding to understand the problems of today caused by practices of yesterday.

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6 factors to help determine whether your unpaid internship is legal

6 factors to help determine whether your unpaid internship is legal | Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, and Restorative Justice | Scoop.it
Unpaid internships got a new round of scrutiny in 2013 when a federal district court judge in New York found Fox Searchlight Pictures violated unpaid internship rules by not paying two interns on the set of “Black Swan.” Contrary to popular belief, labeling a “job” an “internship” isn’t enough to make it legal to get unpaid labor.
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