Als Return to Edu...
Follow
Find
279 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

NATO Members and Partner Countries

Al Picozzi's insight:

Take a look at this map.  NATO has expanded much since its founding in 1949.  Manily only the areas in grey do not have a relation with NATO in any way.  The Partners mainly are the old Soviet Republics.  Still many former Warsaw Pact nations are now in NATO.  NATO is still open for more nations to join.  Do you think the other couontries of the world feel left out and that they should join?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Maps of War ::: Visual History of War, Religion, and Government

Maps of War ::: Visual History of War, Religion, and Government | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Maps-of-War is a multimedia site dedicated to producing diverse, creative visuals that enhance our understanding of war and its history.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Nice quick site of Maps.  The one pictured show decmocracy spread from the start of recorded time to modern times in about 90 seconds.  Other maps are very interesting, the History of Religion for example.  Nice site to check out.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Fire and Smoke

Fire and Smoke | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

With the fires going on in Arizona, this is a great site to see what effect they are having ont he landscape.  The use of satellits to see the effect and maybe even help to fight these kinds of fires can be of great advantage to the people on the ground.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Rabbi-Chaplains of the Civil War

Rabbi-Chaplains of the Civil War | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A controversial proposition, a receptive president and some surprising support.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see how our belief and our culture of religious freedom was used to help get Rabbis into the Union Army to serve the Jewish soldiers that were fighting.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

British have invaded nine out of ten countries - so look out Luxembourg

British have invaded nine out of ten countries - so look out Luxembourg | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks like the British wanted to make everyone mad.  Remember the old say "the sun never set on the British Empire."  Now you can see how that can be true.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

A special Knightsville corner - The Feast of the Madonna Della Civita.

A special Knightsville corner  - The Feast of the Madonna Della Civita. | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

The feast in the Knightsville section of Cranston start Wednesday 7/17/13.  Always has been a part of my life and part of my culture that I am passing on to my children.  It is important to me for them to know where they came from, that traditions and culture are important.  Its a great time, that is run by St. Mary's Church in Cranston, to be with family, friends and to have some great food.  This feast is run at about the same time as the original feast in Itri, Italy where many of the locals in Cranston can trace their family heritage. See http://trecancelle.wordpress.com/2009/07/26/feast-of-la-madonna-della-civita-itri-part-one/ for more info on the feast in Itri.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualized the LOTRs

Visualized the LOTRs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 2013 3:36 PM

The Lord of the Rings was a remarkably well-defined, internally consistent geography for a work of fiction.  This map (high-res) visualizes the journey of the main characters on their epic adventure through Middle Earth.

 

Tags: English.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 15, 2013 10:32 AM
If you eve seen some of the maps they developed for this series of book, it is just incredible the amount of detail.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Developers have WWII airfield in their sights

Developers have WWII airfield in their sights | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
During an anniversary ceremony in Hawaii several years ago, retired Marine Maj. John Hughes described the scene of the surprise attack by the Japanese on the island on Dec. 7, 1941.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A battle here going on historical importance and culture on one side and the need to develop on the other.  the City Council of Honolulu gave the ok to develop the area of Ewa Filed.  This was one of the airfields that was attacked during the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941.  Many people do not want this to happen as it is an important to them for the memory it serves, no less important in their eyes to say the Arizona Memorial.  We need, as a culture, in my opinion to keep this historical sites free from development so we know where we have come from and where we need to go in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Battletech and the Inner-Sphere of 3048.

Battletech and the Inner-Sphere of 3048. | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

If anyone knows what my avatar is they know what this map represents.  This was from my past.  As a kid a played and game called Battletechand read every peperback book that deals with this science fiction universe.  My avata is the symbol of the Fererated Commonwealth a nation in this universe.  It is represented in yellow in the map above.  Earth, Terra on this map, is in the center with thousands of worlds surrounding it.  The makers of this series of books and games created thousand of worlds each with its own geography and environment.  The series of books and games spans hundreds of years and hundres of worlds.  It was easy to get loss in this universe.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico

Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As climate change alters rainfall patterns and river flows, tensions are bound to rise between states and countries that share rivers that cross their borders. In the Rio Grande Basin of the American Southwest, that future inevitability has arrived.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 7:34 PM
Even in the US water supply can still be an issue.
Kate Makin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 7:23 AM

Social Impact

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:57 PM

Both Texas and New Mexico share the water supply that is giving by the rivers that cross between the border and can have a profound effect on the growth of farmland and agriculture of both Texas and New Mexico, which shows that many places can be effected by the geography that is intertwined among places in the world.*

Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

International Networks Archive \\ Remapping Our World

International Networks Archive \\ Remapping Our World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

That's alot of coffee and fries.  Talk about a global network.  Food and drink is one way to dpread culture.  Take a look at the other facts from this site, the weapons and the water one are very interesting.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Mr. D's AP US History
Scoop.it!

The making of Americans: Immigration

The making of Americans: Immigration | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The "melting pot" has been glorified, vilified, and dismissed as obsolete. But both census data and the stories of millions of individual immigrants indicate that the not-always-easy process of assimilation is alive and well.

Via Mr. David Burton, AP US History
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is a melting pot.  It get less and less of the older immigrations, Irish, Italian and other, but newer immigrants add to this melting pot.  I once read someone said that their grandparents were Italian-Italian immigrants, they they were Italian-American, that their kids are American-Italian and thayt their grandkids will be American-American, the pot might get dilluted every so often, but someone will always add to it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

The National WWII Museum: WWII at a Glance: Victory Gardens

The National WWII Museum: WWII at a Glance: Victory Gardens | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
During World War II, Victory Gardens were planted by families in the United States (the Home Front) to help prevent a food shortage.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Talk about a change in agriculture during wartime.  These garden eventually accounted for 40% of all veggies grown in the US by 1944.  My great Uncle started one and kept it till he passed away.  Just amazing to see what could be grown even in cities when it was absolutely necessary.  More info can be found here: http://classroomvictorygarden.org/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Moving A Rare Piece Of Military History - WKRG-TV

Moving A Rare Piece Of Military History - WKRG-TV | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Moving A Rare Piece Of Military History
WKRG-TV
Relocating the gun to Bicentennial Park is a small part of a long-term strategic plan to make North Baldwin County a regional, military history and tourism destination.
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is something that needs to needs to done country wide and where the US has memorials overseas.  We need to preserve oour history no matter where it is.  It is part of our culture, it is part of our history and they all need to be protected and preserved.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Explore: Heat -- National Geographic

Explore: Heat -- National Geographic | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As temperatures have soared to record highs in recent years, we take a look at how National Geographic photographers have captured some of the most extreme examples of the effects of heat on our planet.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Since it has been so hot lately, I'd figure I'd join the club.  Lots of heat going on n the following pictures, but they are some great pictures of what just goes on on this very active world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

U.S. states renamed - Tilted Forum Project Discussion Community

U.S. states renamed - Tilted Forum Project Discussion Community | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
131 – US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs Strange Maps
Al Picozzi's insight:

Love this site.  This map is great.  Some of the states have a GDP equal to and great than some of th G8 nations, look at California! 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shark Tracker

Shark Tracker | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2013 10:02 PM

This is a project sponsored by OCEARCH (Ocean Reseach) that helps to track the journeys of individual sharks to better understand their migratory patterns.  This data also helps to establish maps of the spatial extend of Shark habitat.  This is in essence another fantastic practical application of GPS technology.


Tags: biogeographymapping, GPS.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 16, 2013 11:51 PM
its just never safe to get back intot he water is it. guess Im just showing my age with that movie reference. Saw Jaws at the Route 44 Drive in the Rustic full the the metal speaker that hung on your window...so much fun
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
more...
HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:05 PM

While this might simply seem like a group of ports the more important message conveyed is that in fact that the majority of them are located in East Asia. Gone are the days of the industrial centers of the earth being located in Europe and the Americas. Paired with cheap labor and ease of global transportation many of these East Asian countries are quickly over coming many of the earths previous economic giants. 

Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Cranston East hockey is no more; Bolt will merge with Cranston West

Cranston East hockey is no more; Bolt will merge with Cranston West | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Ice hockey at Cranston High School East, with its decades-long history of championships, All-State players and future pros and coaches, is history.Only seven players remain from the 2013 Thunderbolt roster,...
Al Picozzi's insight:

Interesting story about the changing demographics in Cranston, my hometown.  Here is a quote from the article: "Middle class neighborhoods that produced Caucasian hockey players for Cranston East in decades past now produce Asian and Hispanic volleyball and soccer players, which is great for those sports but bad for hockey."  Alot of those families have moved to the western side of Cranston, hence the merge with West, but that program is alos suffering.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Geography and Science Fiction: the Creation of Realistic Alternative Worlds

Geography and Science Fiction: the Creation of Realistic Alternative Worlds | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
(Note to readers: As GeoCurrents is technically on vacation, it seems like a good time to explore an issue that falls outside of the blog’s basic field of concern.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Being a fan of science fiction, I have always found it amazing how they can create world after world after world each unique, but in some way based on real geogrphic conditions.  Not just space fiction, looks at the maps and worlds created for Lord of trhe Rings and Game of Thrones or even the online games of World of Warcaft and Lord of the Rings Online.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Catholic Church Has Shifted Southward

Catholic Church Has Shifted Southward | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In 1900, two-thirds of the world’s Catholics lived in Europe. Today only 20 percent do.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:02 PM

As Europe has become an increasingly secularized set of societies, the demographic based of the Catholic Church has shifted south.  However, the power structure has not migrated south as the European cardinals still are a majority (although 2/3 vote necessary to elect the next pope). 


Tags: Christianity, culture, diffusionreligion.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 7:26 PM
With the shift south I think that was one of the main reasons the Pope was chosen from a South American country. It really is the only place the Catholic religion is growing
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 3:34 PM

Religion

Scooped by Al Picozzi
Scoop.it!

Egypt's 1952 revolution and military rule, a history in photos

Egypt's 1952 revolution and military rule, a history in photos | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
On July 23, 1952 a group of Egyptian army "Free Officers" engineered a coup d'etat. Military leaders have kept a firm grasp on power ever since.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Also happened at the end of the Ottoman Empire, of which Egypt once belonged.  Mustafa Kemal with what was left of the Ottoman Military supported Turkish nationalsim and deposed the Sultan and gave birth to Modern Turkey.  So here is a question to ponder, is a military coup detat to change governamnets part of the culture in this area? If it is, does anyone have the right to interfere?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Changing Geography of Quinoa

The Changing Geography of Quinoa | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Bolivian and Peruvian farmers sell entire crop to meet rising western demand, sparking fears of malnutrition

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 8:48 PM

Bolivia and Peru once enjoyed Quinoa as a locally grown grain that was used in a nutritious diet. However, because  other parts of the world are becoming increasingly accustomed to Quinoa it is driving the price of the grain in both countries, which is putting the locals in a tough pot because it is practically tripling in price. The poorer citizens are struggling to get Quinoa, something that they once got relatively easy.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:12 PM

This is an example of the harmful effect of globalization, those who grew quinoa for food are now forced to ship away their food source leading to starvation and a slew of other issues. Those in the west with their obsession with "Super Foods" have without realizing it driven up the price of this grain to the extend that those who relied upon it as their staple crop can no longer afford to eat it themselves.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 3, 12:54 PM

I remember walking into Panera Bread one morning a few months back. In the doorway, they had a sign that read, "Now serving Quinoa Oatmeal." I thought to myself, "What the hell is a Key-noah?" Now, it seems I can't go anywhere without hearing about this grain.

 

Touted as the super grain, Quinoa has been used for centuries as a source of sustenance for the dwellers of the Andes. But what happens when a traditional food source, only able to grow in a small region is suddenly desired by large parts of America and Europe? Supply and demand has kicked in and if it's more profitable to eat something else and sell your crop, then I'd imagine most folks would do just that like they are in the Andes. The problem with selling your main source of nutrition is that when you aren't eating it, you're not getting the nutrients you normally got. Is stripping a people of their ancestral food source and malnutrition worth it for a bowl of oatmeal at Panera?