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Detroit Bankruptcy a “Game-Changing Event,” Meredith Whitney Says

Detroit Bankruptcy a “Game-Changing Event,” Meredith Whitney Says | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
It’s been just over a week since Detroit filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history and, so far, there are more questions than answers about how this will all shake out. On Wednesday, a U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to seee what has happened in Detroit.  Watch the video how she states all that left is a welfare state that pays no taxes.  Also will this lead other large metropolitan area to follw their lead?  Is this the beginning of the end for many cities or will this serve as a wake up to get all parties, city-governments and unions and pension holders and others to work together???

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China military urges vigilance over Japan's defense plan

China military urges vigilance over Japan's defense plan | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

China's response to the action that the Japanese might want to increase their military.  Interesting to see that China feels Japan should not be in fear of China's military, even though they just completed their first aircraft carrier.  They also refer to Japan's World War II past...is that fear really there, that Japan will do the same thing.  The Chinese also feel that Japan has not done enough to atone for their past action in China in WWII.  Intersting especially from a country with questionable human rights violations.

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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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BEA Regional Economic Accounts

BEA Regional Economic Accounts | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Data on state and local area personal income (state quarterly, annual; local area annual), gross state product, GSP, GDP by state (current, historical GDP by state), Gross Domestic Product by State, regional input-output modeling (RIMS II),...
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Great site that has a ton of data.  Take a look at the map section as you can create your own maps with whatever economic data for any geographic location in the US.  Great information here.

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Watch the whole episode.  Interesting about the process that is done and interesting to watch where the factories are located.

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Madison Roth's curator insight, January 20, 7:58 PM
This video relates to my current AP human geography class because we are learning about industries and it is speaking of the coke industry. This, more specifically, is a bulk-gaining industry and is placed strategically based on all factors (situation and site). I think that the coca-cola industries are growing rapidly as stated in the video. Also, that the plants are placed nicely (closer to consumers to avoid transportation costs) taking into consideration the amount of coke needed to be produced and the countless factories relative to each other.
Angel Peeples's curator insight, January 20, 8:03 PM
  This is related to world cultural geography by being an industry. A industry is a economic activity concerned with the processing of raw materials and manufacture of goods in factories. Coca Cola is a huge industry that makes billions of dollars a year, 1.6 billion people reaches for a coca cola a day! This industry is a bulk gaining industry, the ingredients don't weight that much but when you put it all together it weighs quite a lot because of this the transportation cost would be to great for going a long distance so they must be closer to the markets instead of the inputs. This article is mostly about how Coca Cola is made and about all the factories worldwide to meet their growing demand.   
Rebecca Cooler's curator insight, January 20, 9:45 PM
This article relates to the topic because in human geography industries are described as either bulk gaining or bulk reducing. My opinion on the topic is that this would be a bulk gaining industry because it's adding bulk.
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South Sudan’s President relieves VP and dissolves government

South Sudan’s President relieves VP and dissolves government | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

July 23, 2013 (JUBA) – South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir Mayardit, has issued a presidential decree removing the vice-president, Riek Machar Teny, and dissolved the whole government.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Here is a living example of how hard it is to start a new country.  Imagine what our founding fathers int he US was doing back in 1783 when they were trying something new, with not much to look to in the past as an example.  Even with all the history since then, and all the examples of how to for a working governemt, startnig a new country in the area of the world that was once controlled by imperialists and warlords is not going to be an easy task by no stretch of the imagination.  We can only hope for the best for these people.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:37 AM

Unfortunately, these actions seem to be the one of a man who is trying desperately to hold on to his power. It is known that there was a power struggle between him and members of his government. It is the last thing this young country needs when it is trying to establish itself.  Hopefully this move does not lead to the very thing South Sudanians were trying to get away from.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:59 PM

It is very difficult for a country this young to be politically and economically stable. The president must have a difficult time earning the peoples respect when the country is struggling.  Removing the vice president only upset some locals as they felt he showed signs of a dictator.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:56 PM

He wants to get rid of the entire political cabinet. Who does he think he is, Superman? There is no way this president can take on a whole nation by himself. He needs to reconsider his actions and think about South Sudan and its needs.

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History of revolts and future geopolitics in the Middle East | Pakistan Tribune

History of revolts and future geopolitics in the Middle East | Pakistan Tribune | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Regularly, when spring comes, people expect flowers and green shoots and optimism prevails. Alas, things in the Middle East are quite different. With every
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A view from Pakistan on the Arab sprink and the future on the Middle East.  A very interesting read. 

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Red Dawn remake swapped Chinese flags for North Korean ones

Red Dawn remake swapped Chinese flags for North Korean ones | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"When it comes to making a multimillion-dollar  action blockbuster, an important rule to follow is: do not alienate some1.3 billion potential theatergoers."
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DB: As the reaction to the YouTube “Innocence of Muslims” trailer has shown, we must be more cautious of what we say and how we depict others as social media and cinema can now easily transcend boarders diversifying the place and space of potential viewers.

 

Forms of expression or entertainment such as art, music, dance, food and especially cinema can symbolize many of the values, norms, customs or fears that are prevalent within a particular society. However, these cultural expressions also may also carry a political stigma that conveys a message to its audience.  China has played a major role in the development of the November release of MGM’s remake of the movie “Red Dawn,” which was a 1984 politically-charged Cold War film about the USSR invading America. The remake of the film incorporated many themes associated with a “declining” America, yet this was not China’s concern. Originally the producers of this film intended to replace the USSR with the PRC which would portray China as the villain and antagonist of the film. Yet (as the Chinese government soon made MGM realize) this is inconsistent with the realities of 21st century geopolitics or the globally economy. The threat of having the film blocked by one of their biggest and most lucrative markets in East Asia pressured MGM to re-edit the film depicting North Korea as the villain before its release this November.

 

Question: How has globalization changed the film or entertainment industry in general?


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing how they had to change who the enemy was when they found out the Chinese were being offened.  I remember when the original was being made.  The Soviet Union was up in arms about it, did they change the enemy at that time, nope.  The Soviet Union was not seen as an "economic" threat to making money off the movie, the Chinese are.

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Kate Middleton gives birth to baby boy

Kate Middleton gives birth to baby boy | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to a son, who will be the Prince of Cambridge
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So what is the big hype about the birth of a boy into the British Monarchy that wields no real political power?  Why do we as Americans care?  Tradition and culture.  To be British is to support the Monarchy.  It is part of British beliefs and way of life to support the Monarchy as the British people have done for hundreds of years.  It is ingrained.  Even though there is no real political power the people for the most part still support the Royal Family.  As for us Americans, it is also part of our culture.  We started off as colonies in the British Empire and were so since the founding of Jamestown in 1603 unit the end of the American Revolution in 1783.  We still are interested in what happens there as we had are beginnings in Great Britain.

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Money Won’t Help Land a Place in This Oasis, but a Uniform May

Money Won’t Help Land a Place in This Oasis, but a Uniform May | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Fort Hamilton is a vestige of New York Harbor’s rich military history and a top housing choice for service members looking for a slice of military suburbia about 40 minutes from Manhattan.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A nice place to live in a suburb outsdie of the big city life.  Great to see that we are taking care of the people that take care of us each and every day.  I think that is part of the American culture and tradition that needs to be passed on to our children and beyond. 

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Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 12:53 PM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 8:16 PM

It is interesting to see that not only the topic of Immigration is controversial,  but the terms being used for that topic is also a sensitive subject.

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A wonderful tale of chivalry from WWII

A wonderful tale of chivalry from WWII | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
This is an incredibly marvelous story, well worth the read for those interested in military history: A Higher Call: A stricken Allied bomber, the
Al Picozzi's insight:

An incredible act of compassion from an enemy pilot.  His belief and his traditons of chivalry and how he was raised led to this act in a time when it seemed all sense of humanity was gone.  What the German pilot risked for the American pilots was nothing short than his life. 

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Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -Bangladesh border

Strangest border Ever : world's only 3rd order enclave near India -Bangladesh border | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
. Well, I was just random surfing through the internet, when i came to know about this strange border arrangement between India and bangladesh.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow, this area is just like those Russian wooden dolls, one within another within another.  Found out from this article that there are 100's of these on the border between India nad Bangladesh.  This arrangement needs to be resloved to help the people it is affecting the most, the farmers.  There seems to be a deal in place, butt he issue is still unresolved.

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A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:20 PM

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense. 

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Japanese Minister Proposes More Active Military Presence in Region

Japanese Minister Proposes More Active Military Presence in Region | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Actions by China and North Korea are leading Japan to consider a more aggressive military posture after decades of postwar pacifism.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Given their geographic loaction, the geopolitcis of the area are going to force the Japanese to reverse its stance on the military since the end of World War II.  Some in the government want to change the post-war constitution and change the JSDF, Japanese Self-Defense Force, into a full military not just a self-defense force.

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The Growing Significance of the Ocean for China's Opening up - People's Daily Online

The Growing Significance of the Ocean for China's Opening up - People's Daily Online | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As a nation on its shift from an opening large country to a fully opening strong country,the ocean
Al Picozzi's insight:

A good article to read from China.  It shows how they see that their economic geography is connected to the ocean and their costal ports and cities.  To me this is a return to the past as this area, and China, controlled world trade in the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.  Is there going to be anther shift in control of trade back to the west?  If so, will it take 400 years?

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BBC Country Profiles

BBC Country Profiles | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
BBC Country Profiles: instant guide to history, politics and economic background of countries and territories, and background on key institutions.

Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's comment, July 25, 2013 4:55 PM
Great site for quick info. Thanks
Sabrina Wesley's curator insight, July 26, 2013 12:53 AM

Use for History, Geography, and Math

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 30, 2013 5:06 AM

I need a one-stop shop for my classes and maybe this is it.

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Bizarre Borders


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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Polish abortion laws targeted by supranational institutions

Polish abortion laws targeted by supranational institutions | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Polish laws on abortion are among the strictest in Europe and allow for therapeutic abortion only in a limited number of medically determined sit...
Al Picozzi's insight:

Poland, being a very Roman Catholic country, has the most restrictive abortion laws in the Europe.  Supranational organizations are interfearing witht he Republic of Poland's own laws when the UN and the European Court of Human Rights got involved in a specific case.  This is showing how these supranational organizations can lessen the sovereignty of a country.  Question, would the US bow to these supranational organizations or would the US stand its ground on the laws its governement passed?

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:40 PM

Just rerescooping an older article I scooped in my Geo101 class that fits into the EU discussion.

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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

If you take a look back at history, the only people to ever sucessfully conquer Afghanistan were the Mongols.  The rugged, mountainous terrain made this plac hard to live in and hard to control.  The Mongols were a very mobile people and were able to control the area by aslo being very tolerant of the natives.  Eventually it bacame hard to notice the difference between a Mongol and a native Afghan, they assimilated the Mongols. 

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 2015 2:59 PM

In this video Jennifer L. Fluri explains the borders of Afghanistan. At first Afghanistan was used as a border outline between Russia and British India. The border facing India was named the Durand line, after Sir Durand, who convinced the leader of Afghanistan to respect the line.  There is Iranian/Persian influence in Afghanistan also with the celebration of Nowruz, the Iranian/Persian New Year. That is because Southern Afghanistan was part of Iran in 1502-1736, under the Safavid Empire. Also Dari is one of the main languages spoken in Afghanistan which came from Persia. She ends the video saying “where Afghanistan is today both culturally and geopolitically has to do with their geography”

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 7:15 AM

Afghanistan's current borders are the result of political maneuvering between empires. Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor is a result of this political maneuvering. The corridor was created in order to prevent the Russian Empire and British India from sharing a common border. While many afghans may decry the notion, Afghanistan has been shaped by foreign influence. The same can be said for almost every other nation on the globe. Almost all borders are determined by some from of political maneuvering. Our borders with Mexico and Canada have been determined through treaties and wars.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 12:24 PM

As I have learned more about the world, it's been interesting to see how arbitrary national borders can sometimes be. I think we are taught in school to associate "nations" with "nationalism," and although that is generally the case for most industrialized nations (whose citizens generally feel they are "nationals" within their own borders), it is not always true for the rest of the world. We see this in the numerous ethnic disputes in African nations, in the violent Yugoslav wars in Europe, and today with the Kurd uprising in Syria and Iraq- we see ill-defined borders that do not meet the needs of their peoples, nations that do not encompass the same sentiments of nationalism. As a result, we see indifference between these various peoples at best, or open conflict between varying ethnic and ideological groups at worst. Afghanistan as we know it today is not the result of self-determination or a sense of nationalism, but geopolitical jockeying between Russia and the United Kingdom. It is not a nation, but a political buffer.

As a result, Afghanistan does not act as a single nation- it may have a central government, but that government is incredibly weak, and people in remote areas often do not even know of its existence. Afghanistan is a series of small city-states and even more isolated settlements clumped together behind arbitrarily drawn lines, living their lives in much the same manner their ancestors did 1,000 years ago. This has made the mountainous, isolated regions of the nation a haven for terrorists and religious extremism, posing a serious issue in the region that, despite billions of dollars and a decade of fighting, the US has been unable to find a solution for. Divided amongst itself, Afghanistan is a nation in name only, something that the West likes to place on the map because of a dispute between two global powers nearly 2 centuries ago.

 

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Inside WWII: Interactive Maps

Inside WWII: Interactive Maps | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Go inside World War II and get new insight into the people, battles and events you thought you knew.

Via Joe Andrade, Amy Marques
Al Picozzi's insight:

Nice quick way to get the user to see some of the key aspects of the War.  Showing the pan-germanism that Hitler esposed when taking the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia to showing the suffering the civilian population of Leningrad.

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Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 8, 2013 1:14 AM

These interactive maps show the events of the second world war in a new and interesting way. It allows users to see some of the geographic motives for the war, such as Germanys quest for "Lebensraum" or living space and  Japans expansion into neighboring countries for materials such as oil. It demonstrates how studying geography and history go hand in hand, it is important to understand geographic principals to understand why history plays out the way it did. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 22, 2013 7:54 PM

This is a great website! It shows never before seen photos from WWII. Something to notice about the photos is the section on Japanese-Americans. It's an eye opener to the way in which Japanese-Americans were treated during WWII. Many americans are almost blind to what the US was trying to end, German expansion in Europe and ending the holocaust, however at the same time, we had our own concentration camps here in CalifornIa.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:53 PM

World War II had a profound impact on so many places; the issues that contributed to these events and complex and inter-related.  This interactive with videos, pictures and commentary is a veritable treasure trove of resources for teachers and students alike.  

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The Right to Fight: African-American Marines in World War II

The Right to Fight: African-American Marines in World War II | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
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Amazing to think that it took a war to let African-Americans serve their country.  It was still a segregated military in World War II, not just for African-Americans but also for Japanese Americans, albeit for different reasons.  The segregation was even worse in the Marines, who did not have any African-American troops in the service.  It took the re-election of FDR for a thrid term and the support of African-American leaders to get him re-elected to start to allow African-Americans into the Marines.   

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Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs

Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

Getting someting from the old gold-rush era miners.  The rare earth elements are in high demand today becasue of the use of these elements in modern technology.  Old gold mine are being examined to be reopened as rare earth element mine.  China at the moment is the largest miner of these elements and are charging a ton of money for them.  According to the article they cut off supplies of some to Japan because of a dispute over international fishing rights.  Along with oil, are these resources going to drive the future economies?  It looks like if you like smart phones and electric cars they will be.

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The Grand Scam: Spinning Egypt’s Military Coup

The Grand Scam: Spinning Egypt’s Military Coup | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Grand Scam: Spinning Egypt’s Military Coup Mohammed E lBaradei meeting former Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon by ESAM AL-AMIN Counterpunch Every coup d’état in history begins with a military General announcing the overthrow and arrest of...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
Al Picozzi's insight:

Another view of the coup in Egypt against the Muslim Brotherhood.  Eveyone has their spin on these issues.  Militray Coups in Egypt have been part of their history.  The Free Officers movement in 1952 led by Nasser and Naguib that overthrew King Farouk is prme example.  Later this led to a conflict over the Suezx Canal in 1956 when Nasser nationalized the canal prompting Great Britian, France and Israel to invade.  Eventually, under pressure from the US, USSR and the UN, they withdrew from Egypt.  Alot going on here that is goning to shape the situation in the Middle East.

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Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards

Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
On July 18, 2013, a fierce wildfire threatened Palm Springs, California.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 20, 2013 3:58 PM
Alot of fire going on out west. Check out the NASA site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/index.html that shows them from a satellite view of the various fires.
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 21, 2013 3:48 PM

I think this shows that the weather has entered into a world of extremes of very hot or very cold, wet or dry and not to much of regular seasonal changes of the past typical patterns.

It shows that with general warmer ocean temps, has lead to this new type of weather patterns resulting from global warming. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:20 PM
When we are liviing in a hot and dry climate we are bound to face more devastating fires accident made or not