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A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums

A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
While light on details, a Russian proposal for Syria to turn over chemical weapons shifts the war debate.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I understand the need to do something and I also understand why Americans do not want to do this.  However I believe something should be done as it seems we all are forgetting our history.  Does anyone remember 9/30/1938.  A speech given by then British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain promised "...peace of our time."  He was talking about the Munich Agreement where Hitler promised that Czechoslovakia would be his last territorial grab.  Well we all know what that led to.  We cannot appease or let people get away with actions like this.  If he is allowed to use the gas on his own people whats to stop him from using it on Turkey, Israel or even in the US as part of a terrorist attack.  Just something else to think about .. an old quote which is a paraphrase, those who do not learn history will be doomed to repeat it.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:36 AM

The world is waiting to see how the drama in the Middle East unfolds. 

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great site to see how globaliztions takes a hold.  Many of the airport on the list of in the US and many are in China.  Not surprising that the two leading economic powers in the world have the busiest airports.  Also it is interening to see Las Vegas on the list.  Seems that people need a place to blow off some steam from working so hard.

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Nice small and quick article the will make the reader see the basics of what is happening in Syria.  It is a great place to start and has some references of where to look if you want to do more.  This area was formed much like Africa.  Random boundaries drawn on the map by colonial powers.  And just like Africa this area has many issues.  Interesting thought??!!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 2013 6:03 PM

You know that you should know more about the current events in Syria; so read this article to get started.


Mrs. B's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:09 PM

Summary of article goes here. A nice, juicy paragraph or so. Just read the article and tell someone what it was about conversationally. 

 

Connection goes here. How does this extremely relevant article relate to the Nature and Perspectives of Geography? This would be a great time to drop some APHUG vocab.Here are some examples: globalization, spatial distribution, 5 themes ofgeography, perception of places, patterns, distribution, scale, location(absolute and relative), environmental determinism, cultural landscape, senseof place, built environment, possibilism, place, centrality, GIS, diffusion(expansion, contagious, hierarchical, stimulus, relocation), cultural barrier,time-distance decay, mental maps, remote sensing, regions (functional, formal,perceptual), mental maps, sequent occupance, hearths, independent invention. 

This is where you get CREATIVE. 


I hope your post gets comments!

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Obama cancels meeting with Putin amid Snowden tensions

Obama cancels meeting with Putin amid Snowden tensions | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In a rare diplomatic snub, President Obama is canceling plans to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow next month. 
Al Picozzi's insight:

So, the cold war is over...hmm maybe not.  This issue with the tension in Iran and Syria seems to remind me of the 1980s disputes witht he old Soviet Union.  Seems the US and the Russians are going to butt heads once again.  Will this one last 50+ years? Or is this just another case of seeing who is goiong to blink first and get back to normal relations?  Going to be interesting watch.  See history does tend to repeat itself.

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Block Island Southeast Lighthouse - Block Island, Rhode Island

Block Island Southeast Lighthouse - Block Island, Rhode Island | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Block Island Southeast Lighthouse in Block Island, Rhode Island - History, Description, Pictures, Photographs, Location, Maps and GPS coordinates of the Block Island Southeast Lighthouse.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A beautiful place to visit.  They had to move it inland 300 feet in 1993 as more of the cliff was eroded away.  Cliff erosion has been an issue at Block Island for years, but they were able to save the lighthouse.  Well worth the money to preserve such a resource.  As the erosion continues I wonder when the next move will have to be? Only time will tell.

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Israel widens settlement subsidies

Israel widens settlement subsidies | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Israel angers Palestinian officials by extending a subsidy scheme to settlements that were illegal until recently, days after peace talks restarted.
Al Picozzi's insight:

With the peace process just starting again, will this act derail it as it has done in the past?  The settlements in the occupied territority are considered illegal under international law, a claim that Israel denies.  Shoudl the US and the international community set in and stop the spread of the settlements oe even get them to be removed?  Or shoudl they remain in order to guarantee the security of Israel?  It seems that every time peace is talked about in this area, something happens that puts the peace process in danger.

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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A Rhode Island School for Wayward Boys Is Itself Reformed

A Rhode Island School for Wayward Boys Is Itself Reformed | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The remains of the Sockanosset Training School for Boys in Cranston, R.I., are now the base of a development with retail, residential and commercial space.
Al Picozzi's insight:

An article from back in 2009.  Showing how Cranston was revitalizing the Sockanosset area.  These buildings were "the bad boys school" as I was told when I was growing up.  You can see the original chapel that was kept in the picture above.  The area in now complete and called Chapel Hill.  The dorms were incorporated into the new buildings to keep some of the old architecture.  There is no real downtown in Cranston.  Everytime someone says downtown one thinks of Providence.  Is this an attempt to make a downtown area in Cranston?  I do not htink so, it is an extension of the olf Garden City Shopping Center, that downtown feeling is missing to me.  However it was an attempt to revitalize the area after a number of businesses closed in Garden City.  Did it work?  Seems to be working as the area has attracted new businesses and resturants and construction is still going on!

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Waterfire downtown Providence, Rhode Island at Water Place Park

Waterfire downtown Providence, Rhode Island at Water Place Park | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Photo by Mark Corbett. Here is a photo I took in the Summer in Providence, Rhode Island at the Water Place Park during one of the Waterfire events held in Providence RI.
Al Picozzi's insight:

What is considered part of downtown Providence, RI today.  Alot different from the picture that I have scooped from 1945 Westminster Street picture.  The similarities, all the activiity, just look at the number of people at Waterplace Park.  Compare it to this picture http://blogs.providencejournal.com/ri-talks/architecture-here-there/brisprovwest.JPG of Westminster Street today.  You still see the shopper and some fo the cars, however to be the "downtown" has shifted a bit and expanded.  To me to be downtown is to be where things are happening, where people go, not just work and shop.  Waterfire is a great cultural activity that brings life to downtown, artist show their work, street performers, and just people mixing, talking, etc.  That is what downtown is to me.  It changes over time and what is downtown in Providence, RI is going to be different that what one might consider downtown in Rome, Italy, New York, NY or even Cranston, RI.

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Providence, RI Downtown Providence in 1945

Providence, RI Downtown Providence in 1945 | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Main Streets of America. Westminster Street at Mathewson, looking north to Dorrance Street. This is the center of the shopping district. From the National Archives 111-SC box 692 329494.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Downtown Providence in 1945.  Look at all the activity, people shopping and walking, streetcar rails still in the street, cars parked along the side, retail shops, eating establishments, just a hub of activity.  I still think this is what it means to be downtown, an area of large activity, a place where stuff is done.  What stuff is done, is what changes over time.

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:45 AM

This is a very cool story on how things were in Providence back at the end of WW2 and how much downtown has changed and the new parts of the city look today... good stuff

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Petula Clark - Downtown

"Downtown" is a pop song composed by Tony Hatch following a first-time visit to New York City.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Listen to this song from 1964.  Before my time but its the music my parents listened too.  It describes what it means to be downtown in 1964, where everything is, where the neon lights are, where you can forget all your troubles, go to the movie shows, and where you can listen to the "music" of the traffice of the city around you.  It tells alot about urban geography of the time, traffic, bright lights, go there to do stuff and forget about life, go to the movies, a very very active place where everybody goes.

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Forced to flee war, many Malian refugees to miss vote

Forced to flee war, many Malian refugees to miss vote | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
DAKAR/MANGAIZE, Niger (Reuters) - When Talhatou Hallahi Maiga heard that Malian officials had dispatched new ID cards to the desert north in preparation for Sunday's presidential election, he slipped out...
Al Picozzi's insight:

In a hard time in Mali people are missing a right that here in the US most people do not take advange of, the right to vote.  One man had to leave a refugee camp in order to get his voting card, but he did it even with all the danger involved.  Hard to understand how the people in the US just do not vote, especailly when compared to other areas of the world, it is completely safe.

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Watch One World Trade Center Rise And Change The New York Skyline Forever

Watch One World Trade Center Rise And Change The New York Skyline Forever | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The construction of One World Trade Center has transformed New York City's skyline more than a decade after the tragic September 11, 2001 attacks.
Al Picozzi's insight:

I can't believe it was twelve years ago that this occured.  Take a look at these amazing pictures that show the change of NYC's skyline.  This is something we should alwyas remember just like Pearl Harbor, or the Challenger disaster.  I know where I was on that day at that moment, can you remember?

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The Water's Edge » Has Congress Ever Denied a President’s Request to Authorize Military Force?

The Water's Edge » Has Congress Ever Denied a President’s Request to Authorize Military Force? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Many people inside the Beltway doubt that President Obama will succeed in convincing Congress to authorize a military strike against ... (Has Congress ever turned down a president's request to authorize military force?
Al Picozzi's insight:

Interesting to see that Congress has say no in the past, albeit very much in the past.  Since that time the US has used its military power under the authority of the President as Commander in Chief and not with a formal declartion of war from Congress.  The President has the power and the right to have military actions, but should he wield it.  Just because you have the power does not mean you should always use it.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | News | National Post

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | News | National Post | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

 

Globalization has changed North American ethnic patterns as fewer European immigrants are migrating to Canada, and more are coming for Asia.  Not surprisingly, the urban areas are the regions were this pattern is most pronounced. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is what is happening in the U.S. also.  As globalization continues more immigrants from non-European countries are heading to the US.  The old ethic neighboors, the little Italy for example, are still there but there are not many Italians left.  Most left the inner cities for the suburbs, much like in Canada.  Amazing to see similar patterns in different countries.

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 9:45 PM
Asians have been affiliated with Canada for many years. Many immigrant workers in the 1800s helped Canade build their railroads. Many Vietnamese refugees escaped to Canada during the Vietnam war. Today Asians are still migrating to Canada forming a multi-cultural society. In the 90s most immigrants were able to get cheap land, but now modern prices have inflated.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 1:39 PM

The idea of ethnic enclaves themselves have an interesting commentary of sorts on the current political climate. It's been said time and time again in recent years that diversity is to be celebrated and encouraged, but we can see very clearly that some people do not wish to live in diverse neighborhoods and would rather live with people very similar to themselves. Even the capital of Rhode Island, Providence, is segregated in this sort of way.

 

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European History Interactive Map

European History Interactive Map | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great Quick tool to use and very informative.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, August 9, 2013 5:03 PM

I've used this site as a resource in the past and it is great for looking at changes of a region over time. The digital annotations can help this become a part of a great self-directed activity.

 

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, August 10, 2013 7:51 PM

So many uses!

Lola Jennings- Edquist's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:56 AM

What an awesome map! A great resource for teaching kids history- and making it simple to understand, as well as interactive. Can be used in conjunction with the 'Protest Sites' map I scooped above; in a unit on protests and change around the world. 

 

I think it links to most areas of Humanities, which is cool. I showed it to some of the kids from placement and they loved it! 

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The Geo-Politics of Military Bases, Empire and Independence

The Geo-Politics of Military Bases, Empire and Independence | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

The Ministry of Defence’s latest threat to keep Faslane as sovereign territory in the event of Scottish Independence should be seen in the context of Britain’s imperial history of maintaining military bases against the wishes of local people across the world.

 

Al Picozzi's insight:

Really interesting news in Geopolitics and devolution.  If Scotland does vote to split form the UK, and if the UK even aloows the vote to mean something, what will happen to all the militray stationed in Scotland?  How about all the UK businesses there?  What will an independant Scotland do? What currency wil they have, the Euro? Will they even get into the EU? Lots of questions to answer here and way to many to list.  Something to think about though isn't it?

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Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is not just human's that have to adapt to the environment.  As we have adapted to the wilderness that once existed, animals are now adapting to the new urban areas.  It is just amazing to see what these dogs can do,

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:51 PM

Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you notice that the commuters around you include a stray dog. Some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's complicated subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops. The human commuters around them are so accustomed to it that they rarely seem to notice. As many as 35,000 stray dogs live in Russia's capital city. They can be found everywhere, from markets to construction sites to underground passageways, scrounging for food and trying to survive. Using the subway is just one of many strategies that they use to survive. Living in the streets in tough and these dogs know this better than some humans. What is most impressive about their dogs is their ability to deal with the Metro's loud noises and packed crowds, distractions that domesticated dogs often cannot handle.

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Population Density

Population Density | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing and easy to use map that shows were poeple mainly live.  It shows plainly where people settle and the patterns that develop, costs are still heavily populated as are area around major rivers.  Great resouoce to use with other maps to help maybe answer some of the questions about populations and exhaustion of resources.

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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Gentrification in overdrive on DC’s 14th Street

Gentrification in overdrive on DC’s 14th Street | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Great Recession and its messy aftermath will go into the record books for many things: jobs lost, household wealth destroyed, foreclosure auctions held.

Via Joe Andrade
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing read, especially at the end of the article, when he stated that complaints about parking is a good sign.  I bet it was not a good sign to the people that used to be there that no longer had an affordable place to live.  I understand the need to improve areas, but there has to be some thought, some, about the people that have to leave the area.

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Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:48 PM

Just another exaple of gentrification going on in the country.

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon, Joe Andrade
Al Picozzi's insight:

Incredible to see this kind of work.  I really hope this helps people remember what happened and what was given up in World War II.  As we lost more vets every day, we really need to make sure their scarifice is not forgotten.  Incredible piece of work here.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

That is where I live, basic suburbia.  Good lots, lots of roads, know my neighbors without being on top of them, close to a highway to get to other places, trees that every fall I wish I didn't have up here in New England.  I am drawn to these areas.  Why? For the reasons I've stated above, I have a good yard, nice neighbors I know,not too close and not 20 miles away, close to main roads, and close to stuff, well being close in RI is relative, everything is close.  The housing here is single family with lots that cater to people with families, swing sets, pools, etc.  The layout feel like a neighborhood, its close, just the right amount of space, we help each other when needed, in the last blizzard for example, and we get together every now and then, the way the area was built, mostly in the late 1940's to the 1960's, just facilitates this kind of activity.  Was it profitable, probably, what system is most, depends on the area, a grid system for example, really could not work here.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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ANOTHER FACE: U.S. military stronghold keeping watch over the Pacific

ANOTHER FACE: U.S. military stronghold keeping watch over the Pacific | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Under the Obama administration, a strategic pivoting to Asia will see 60 percent of the U.S. Navy's fleet based in the Pacific Ocean by 2020. This has been described as a strategic "rebalance" to strengthen the U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A change in the geopolitics of the Pacific Area.  With the growing of the Chinese Navy with their new aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, and the economic importance of the area, the US will ship 80% of the navy to Pacific waters.  Hawaii's importance as a military base has now increased, or at least returned to the same level as in WWII.  Showing a shift of importance away from the Atlantic waters and Europe.

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Georgian PM Meets Rasmussen, Discusses NATO And Russia

Georgian PM Meets Rasmussen, Discusses NATO And Russia | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Georgian Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili says his country will continue on its course of "joining NATO as soon as possible."

Following talks in Tbilisi with visiting NATO Secretar...
Al Picozzi's insight:

So the main question here is, will Russia allow Georgia, which it fought a short five day war in 2008, to join NATO? With this country right against the border of Russia, will they feel even more surrounded?  Estonia, Latvia and Lituania have joined NATO and there are talks also with the Ukraine about membership.  Will Russia allow it? Do they have a choice?  They went to war once with Georgia, why not again?

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