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U.S. Travel To Cuba Grows As Restrictions Are Eased

The Obama administration has relaxed travel restrictions to Cuba, reinstating Bill Clinton's policy of allowing people-to-people travel.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

With this news you can seen how the times are changing.  Compare this to my scoop on the Cuban Missle Crisis of 1962  i believe we need to normalize our relations with Cuba.  They really are not a threat to our national security, I can't see them alinging with countries like North Korea or terrorists like Al-Qaeda.  This area of the world as a whole needs to be somewhat like the Canadian border, not not completely open.  Can you imagine if a country like Cuba in NAFTA??  Why not? Great market for goods and services. Also the historian in me would love to see Cuba.  Lots of History there just to be seen..who knows maybe there will be an opening soon.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 12:14 PM

This article is about relaxed travel restrictions for Americans visiting Cuba. The United States has restricted American tourism to Cuba as any money the US sends to Cuba is seen as supporting the Castro government. However, since Europe and Canada have no such restrictions there is not a shortage of tourist money being spent in Cuba. With the US relaxing its travel restrictions, Cuban-Americans wanting to visit family or their homeland and many who have long wanted to to visit the country are getting the chance to do so.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 11:05 PM

This article talks about how the Obama administration has begun loosening up its restrictions on Americans traveling to Cuba. Cuba is the only country the US restricts its citizens to visiting. Even though Americans are allowed to travel to Cuba, there is a catch, one would have to go on a U.S. government approved tour, and would not be allowed to go to the beach or Havanas Cabaret at night. The groups goes to hospitals, schools and historic sites, all with a tour guide appointed by the Cuban government. So is this really considering "relaxing travel restrictions" or is it more of, sure you can visit Cuba, but you're only allowed to go where the US government wants you to go.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 1:58 PM

Traveling to Cuba has been a difficult journey to make in the past. With Obama's new rules in place, he has eased the process of travel to this country. These new restrictions will make traveling home to Cuba easier for those who want to visit their relatives.

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Another showing that the trend of illegal immigration is on the decline, even as Congress still is looking for ways to pass an immigration reform bill.  With the US economic problems, post 9/11 tightening of the US border and new labor laws whcih make it difficult to hire people who are considered illegal, plus other factors have led to less and less Mexicans coming to the US.  With NAFTA finally beginning to have a postivie effect in Mexico, more foregin companies are investing in Mexico with its low labor and low transportation costs to the US.  This leads to better and more jobs in Mexico and an economic boom, which it turn allows for better education for Mexican citizens at home.  People from the US are following some of these jobs and they are heading into Mexico as a change in pace from the other way around. 

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Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2:28 PM
I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

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Lax U.S. gun laws enable killing in Mexico

Lax U.S. gun laws enable killing in Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
U.S. needs to help end the violence....

 

When I say "illegal goods trafficked across the U.S.-Mexico border," most of us immediately think about narcotics from Mexico coming into the United States.  However, the border is more complicated than that--the violence on the border isn't only a problem with Mexican governance, but many of the deaths are directly attributable to guns coming form the United States.  This is an op-ed piece arguing the the United States' gun laws are a part of the ongoing problems along the border.   


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Illegal trade runs in both direction, drugs from Mexico north and guns and ammo south from the US.  Some of the trade was a badly handled "sting operation" to trace where the gun eventually went, but the government lost track of where they went and were not able to find the bigger bosses in the cartels.  Compared to gun laws in Mexico, yes ours are lax, however I think to state them as lax or weak in general might be an overstatement.  Some countries are even more strict, like Great Britian and there are some areas of the world where a child can buy an AK-47 off the street in broad daylight.  It is all taken in contex. 

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‘The Bridge’ Series Premiere Review

‘The Bridge’ Series Premiere Review | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
FX's new series, 'The Bridge,' brings two wildly different detectives together in a bizarre murder mystery that also focuses on political tensions along the U.S.-Mexico border.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Why this in a geography type class..well this good show is set in a real location, The Bridge of the Americas that links El Paso, Texas to the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez.  It shows, although with some dramatic license, what can go on in this very charged area of the US and Mexico.  Juarez is called the murder captial of the world, why??  This is one of the major drug routes of the drug trade into the US...and of illegal arms in Mexico.  This show tracks a serial killer, but it shows how the officals have to work together across international borders.

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 10:37 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

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Geography of a Recession

Geography of a Recession | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Here is an animated view of the impact of the recession on the United States.  It's a fantastic geovisualization of a horrible economic reality. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It makes you wonder about the recovery the government is also talking about.  Alot of the new jobs created are temporary, part-time and low wages.  What they also do not tell you is that the unemployment is going down because the government does count the people that are unemployed but have stopped looking from work.  Alot of these people are just tired of looking and have given up.  So if your not looking for work, but are unemployed, you are not counted as unemployed for the purpose of the unemployment number, interesting isnt't it??  What the map shows is that the upper mid-west and the central mid-west seem to be recession proof.   Is that because alot of this area are family farms or is it because these areas are low population and there is a shortage of people to work the available job?  Or are these states just better at running their government?

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 9:12 PM
This map vividly shows how hard the recession is hitting state economies, yet I can’t help but notice that orange strip in the Dakota, Nebraska area and I’m unsure what kind of economy these states have? However, I do know that if it’s related to agriculture they will likely get a shade darker if this drought continues.
Brandon Murphy's comment, August 7, 2012 11:48 PM
It's quite interesting to see the areas of which the local economies are supposedly starting to turn around and what the numbers actually show.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:45 PM

This interactive map offers a lot to read between the lines. Most interesting to me, the middle of the country seemed to be somewhat spared in comparison to the East and West coasts. Perhaps that is becuase the middle of the country has lower population than the coast and that the majority of the jobs held by people there are related to food production. The bread basket of America will never be relieved of demand for goods and that also means workers. Also super interesting- Washigton DC and the surrounding area reflected a somewhat better unemployment rate. Same with Vermont and New Hampshire- perhaps the population is more even with the labor demand than in extremely populated places that only have so many jobs.

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Astrobleme

Astrobleme | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Lake Manicouagan lies in an astrobleme in central Quebec covering an area of approximately 1206 square miles—an area half the size of Delaware. An astrobleme is a scar left on the Earth’s surface from an impact of a meteorite. Lake Manicouagan is the result of one of the largest identified asteroid or comet impacts on Earth. In the middle of the lake, on Rene-Levasseur Island, Mount Babel rises 3,123 feet into the air.

 

Lake Manicouagan is thought to have formed about 212 million years ago plus or minus 4 million years.  This happened when an approximately 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid crashed into Earth toward the end of the Triassic period. Some scientists speculate that this impact may have been responsible for the mass extinction that wiped out more than half of all living species."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This amazing picture shows how vulnerable the earth is to space born hazards.  This 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid might have caused 1/2 the living species on the earth at that time, 212 million years or so ago, to become extinct.  Man has the abilty to adapt to changes to the environment, unlike the dinosaurs.  The question is though do we have the ability to adapt to an event of this magnitude?  Hopefully we will not have to test out this question.

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Colorado flood map 2013: River gauges

Colorado flood map 2013: River gauges | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A map of flood gauges in Denver, Colorado Springs, Boulder, Fort Collins, Fort Morgan and elsewhere, including the Big Thompson River, South Platte River, Cache La Poudre River, Boulder Creek, Bear Creek, Clear Creek and Fountain Creek.
Al Picozzi's insight:

This article shows that many of the rivers are way above the flood limit.  It also shows that the major flooding is north of Denver along the Big Thompson River and the South Platte River.  It looks like it followed Route 34, which has been heavily damaged in the rain and the floods.  It will take years to rebuild this entire area.  Some questions to ask is that do we rebuild in these same areas?  If so is there a way to mitigate these floods that are going to happen?  or Do we build somewhere different to avoid this type of disaster?

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Inside the Colorado deluge

Inside the Colorado deluge | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Two things that helped make this rainfall historic are breadth and duration. Colorado can get much higher rainfall rates for brief periods and over small areas."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Almost seems like a perfect storm scenario.  Large amouts of rain over a long perod of time over a large area.  This combined with a late summer/early fall heat wave and tons of moisture in the air, with climate change all contributed to the disater in Colorado.  They also believe the changes made by people to the physical geography over the last hundred years or somade have contributed to teh flooding in the area.  Development can effect the way a place floods.  Where there were once open fields and trees, there are now parking lots and houses which just can't absorb rainfall.  Makes you ask the question, shouldn't there be more study of where we exapnd our cities and what effect this will have in case of a major rainfall, earthquake, blizzard, etc?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2013 8:20 AM

Our thoughts are with our colleagues and friends in Colorado as they are dealing with the impact of this historic weather event.  The geographic factors that contributed to this flooding are explained in this article from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).  Some are calling this a millennial flood, as it is well past the 100-year stage of flooding.  You may view the areas impacted on an ESRI storymap. and in this NASA imagery


Tags: physical, disasters, environment, water, weather and climate.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 16, 2013 3:40 PM

The devastating flooding in Colorado has impacted so many. The rainfall Colorado has experienced makes it the most on record. The massive amounts of flooding and devestation in areas like Boulder are caused by the highly populated valley areas.  

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, September 18, 2013 5:27 PM

      What was interesting about this particular deluge was how much rain fell and how it happened in such a short time. Meteroligist high wet density levels of vapor that rose to high altitutdes and was able to condense into water and help in a perfect combination of weather to create a powerfully dangerous flash flood.

    The article recounts a former major colorodo flood that occured in 1978 and had killed over 150 people during a centenial celebration.

   After this occurence warning signs were put up beside the roads to warn travelers of flash flood possiblities and to promote safety. These floods do not happen in Colorado often and are usually a surprise. They do not when the nextmajor flash flood may occur in the boulder region but they know through historical patterns that it will happen again. 

This article stood out to me because I have friends that live in these areas and had to run for safety and move their cars to prevent damage in these same areas. The good thing is that the people that I know from this area are doing ok.

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see the amouth of detail they were able to map in a time of no computers and low technology.  Very useful for the Union field commanders at the time.  It enable them to determine what they might face as they marched through the Southern US.  The map also shows that though slavery was in the south in wasn't as heavy in some areas as compared to others. 

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Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:09 PM
good maps http://www.skoyun.com/oyunlar/oyunskor
Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The drug wars are still around, but as the artical states it is being done is less public ways and in remote areas.  The drug lords will not push to much for if they do they will bring more of the military on them, not just the local police which really could not stop them.  Also the more publilc it is the more the US would want to get involved to try to stem the problem.  The will continue to lay low as this type of story dies down and the US focuses on something else, like Syria at the moment.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 12:13 PM

As military and government officials stepped in to control the drug wars, cartels have made greater efforts to quiet their attacks. Although the attacks are quieter, they are still happening at constant rates. As cartels clash into eachother, more problems arrive and once again question the legalization of marijuana.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 12:28 PM

This article talks about the realization of the Mexician drug war and the way that these riots have affected Mexican land overall. For example the statistics of the violence against the Mexican military army for 2011-2012 is alarming; there has been 503 Attacks, 181 Injjuries and, 31 deaths of the people who are sworn to protect the citizens.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 3:02 PM

The new president of Mexico, Enrique Pena Nieto, has been trying to make the Cartel and governments fighting less apparent.  In a war, each side has to learn how to play the other's game, which is what is happening here.  Perhaps the Cartel is going along with this so they can "test the waters" of this new president and his very different policies (compared to Felipe Calderon).  Nieto wants to focus less on the drug wars, so the Cartel is laying low in northern rural areas, so they can still smuggle drugs into and guns out of the United States.

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Love these maps.  Bubbler is so right in RI and I never knew it was called that anywhere else.  However I think they got the one about the subs wrong.  I still call those sandwhiches a grinder.  I went to Texas once and ask for a grinder and I still think the guy there is laughing at me to this day.  Its really is great to see the difference though even though this is one country with many different backgrounds.

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François B.'s comment, June 7, 2013 8:58 AM
Highly recommanded!! A must-read!
MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:50 AM
Excellent
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 4:29 PM

These 22 maps are a great representation of how linguistically different the United States truly is. Depending  where you are from I the US shows how you say something differently. For example, in the Northeast and South, people pronounce the word caramel in two words, "cara and mel" and in the west and west coast it is pronounced " car-mel". Even the word crayon is pronounced differently depending where you live. 

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Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map

Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
No one quite agrees on what counts as America's "Midwest," but its pattern of urbanization is one of a kind.

Via John Blunnie, Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It really is hard to determine the regions as everyone has their own ideas and opinions of what consititues a region.  Some I think are easy because they have been set in history, like New England. It is the six north east states that has long been set in history.  However something like the South is hard to define.  Is Texas the south becasue it fought with the south in the Civil War or is it part of the west because it is west of the Mississippi? 

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 27, 2013 5:49 PM

Article on what American's consider the "midwest". Its interesting how different people can view were a region is when it has no official boundaries.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 10:30 AM

Regions can have very nebulous borders...the Midwest is a perfect example of a vernacular region with as many different borders as there are people to draw them. 


Mark Solomon's curator insight, August 21, 2013 10:31 AM

The American Midwest is a good example of a vernacular region, as it is perceived in different ways by many different people as an important part of their cultural history.

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Cuban Missile Crisis - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

Cuban Missile Crisis - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just a look back of what the relations were in the 1960s and how close the US and the USSR came to full blown nuclear war.  I asked both my parents what it was like in 1962 during this time.  Both of them said it was a scary time.  Nuclear attack drills daily when this was going on in October 1962.  This area so close to the US geographically made a huge difference even though the Soviets had missles that could reach the US from Russia and elswhere in Europe.  It was the fact that there would be so little warning of a launch and that it was right in our "back yard"...remember the Monroe Doctrine.  Kennedy invoked its use in order to stop the missiles.  But now times have changed..see my next scoop...

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:22 AM

The Cuban Missle Crisis was a very scary moment for the world and is a very blatant example of how the US managed/used coersion in their relationships with Latin American countries during the Cold War. Geographically, the fall of Cuba to communism was a huge blow to the United States because it represented a severe military threat. The US sought to control all of South America and democratize it in the Cold War because of its geographically strategic position to the US.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 1:59 PM

A look back at a scary time during October 1962 when the US and USSR where close to a nuclear missle war. It was filled with days of nuclear safety drills and fear of the unknown while Kennedy worked hard to get the situation under control.

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks like time are changing.  As Mexico becomes more business friendly and with cheap labor and less government regulations more and more people, as well as businesses are going to go there.  NAFTA only increases this more.  Mexico is in the perfect position literally. Right next to the United States and closer to Europe than China dramatically lowers transportation costs, which in turn leads to greater profits for the company.  This will eventually lead to more jobs and great opportunity in Mexico, both for Mexicans and people immegrating into Mexico.  As NAFTA takes hold and the economy so sluggish in the US, rising costs in China, and with the EU have economic crisis after economic crisis, it seems for the the time the Mexico is the place where you want to do business.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:43 PM

The wealth of a nation can come from many differnet aspects, jobs land, ecnomy, resoucres, and labor force. In many contries like china and indina they have lots of factorys and factory workers. However what ahppens when the cost of living and transporations go up, should we give workers a pay raise? NO. The answer is to find people who are able to work for cheeper. This lead to the mass influx of mexican factorites and the mass influx of forign workers fleeing to mexico for the jobs and simple life.

It was very interesting to see how even workers form the US were going to mexico in search of jobs becuse ten years ago it was the exact oppisit.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 3:44 PM

As domestic problems increase in countries where the United States have been previously "setting up shop", institutions are rethinking where they outsource manufacturing to.  It is becoming increasingly more expensive to ship goods from China or Europe.  People of all sorts are turning to Mexico, where the United States already has a good manufacturing foundation, to find new opportunities in many different increasingly competitive (globally) sectors.  This is allowing Mexico to be culturally, economically, and socially closer than ever before to many countries around the world.  This large influx of people from all around the world is definitely welcomed, but is being monitored and managed with great care and strategy in order to ensure that this shift benefits everyone.  Mexico is currently very flexible since it is transitioning into a more first-world country; this gives entrepreneurs a great place to start experimenting and migrants a chance to shape Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:39 AM

Foreigners on work visas is a huge and broadening event that is happening throughout the world. Most of the people on work visas have migrated from the U.S. and more now than ever, Europe. With dwelling economies, people are being forced to migrate towards the U.S. and Mexico.

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Salton Trough

Salton Trough | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Along the border of Mexico and the U.S., a geologically and tectonically complex area serves as a visual reference point for astronauts on the International Space Station.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow, amazing picture.  Can see alot of features in the area.  Was surprised to see how the urban patter just continues right over the border especailly in the San Diego/Tijuana area and it alomost looks like Yuma just runs into Mexicali, and I believe Calexio, Cailf. is just north of Mexicali, Mexico.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:27 AM

What a great teaching image! Plate tectonics and rifting, agriculture, international borders, urbanization, dry climates, human and environmental interactions...the applications are endless. 

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Mexican army searches for bodies in flood and landslide-hit La Pintada

Mexican army searches for bodies in flood and landslide-hit La Pintada | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Sixty-eight people missing in village devastated by storms Manuel and Ingrid as government says 200 could be dead
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that the US is not the only place at this time to have disasters from large amounts of rainfall.  The people of this area describe a rainfall that was very similar to the description of the people of the Denver/Bolder area in Colorado.  What makes it worse in this area is the remote area of some of the villages.  Whereas the damage in Colorado was in the cities and the main road, more outliying areas in Mexico were hit hard.  The Mexican Army is trying its best to reach these areas.  On the similar side Acapulco was also hit hard and suffered major flooding from Hurricane Irene and another storm that hit soon after.  Much like Bolder and other Colorado cities it suffered major fllod damages and much like Route 34 in Colorado the highway connecting Acapulco to the rest of Mexico was wiped out.  To underscore this the people are upset with the response of the Mexican government.  With accusations ranging from corruption to downright neglect the people believe the government is at part to blame.  The article states they are going to move the town pictured over to a safer location...I wonder what that move is going to look like....

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 2:59 PM

La Pintada was the area of the greatest tragedy in the wake of the two storms Maunel and Ingrid. There rainfall was very similar to that of the of the areas hit hardest in Colorado. We often forget that the US is not the only place that can experience weather and devestation like this. 

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Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help

Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
From San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., requests for assistance have become a drain on the resources of fire departments in cities on the United States border with Mexico.

 

This is a poignant example of how site and situation impact the local geographic factors. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

These border towns should be getting some help from the federal government.  They handle ther calls of all the border medical emergencies from immigrants, both legal and illegal, and from people who left the US to live better in Mexico, but return to the US for medical care and suffer an "event" at the border to get to the hospital faster.  It also hurts the towns own citizens as sometimes these small towns only have one emergency vechile to do all the calls.  Maybe they should be given a grant to expand their emergency services since alot of the calls they take are from a federal source, ie border control.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 12:05 PM

This is one factor I never thought about before reading the article. Borders are one of the defining concepts of what constitutes a nation, and yet in emergencies these boundaries can become much more fluid. Of course borders in the first place are a human creation, but I imagine that along any border in the world, someone in dire need would want to get to the closest hospital, even if they're crossing a border to do so. At this point the idea of the authority implicated alongside borders might begin to seem less important. Though this makes me wonder if there are some locations which have international treaties so that local foreign departments may cross the border to help.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 4:43 PM

Medical expenses are a burden on millions of people each and every year. With conditions like this on the border there is no wonder why the Calimex fire department and responders needed funds. They also need to do something about the conditions on the California/Mexican border.

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The U.S. Plan to Invade Canada: War Plan Red

The U.S. Plan to Invade Canada: War Plan Red | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A time-honored tradition in the U.S. military, contingency plans have been drawn up for the defense against, and invasion of, most major military powers. In fact, in response to recent events on the Korean peninsula, the U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

And you all thought that the US/Canadian border was going to be safe...well it is...now.  Seems that both sides made plans to invade each other in the 1920s.  Seems that there are contingency plans for everything.  With the relations that we see today, its had to believe that such plans are even necessary...however don't forgot your history.  The US was invaded from Canada by the British during the revolution and we also invaded Canada in both the Revoultion and the War of 1812.  Check out this little article for a brief War of 1812 history http://forgottenhistory.blogspot.com/2007/05/united-states-invades-canada.html ; So imagine now if we did not enjoy what is considered the longest undefended border on the planet??  What would life be like along an unfriendly border that stretches from the Atlantic to the Pacific and the long Alaskan/Canadian border??  Nice to live next to a counrty and not have the North Korea/Sout Korea mentality.

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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

One thing I bet most people did not know is that we get most of our foregin oil from Canada ans not an OPEC country at all.  This source really can help the US, but it does have drawbacks.  Expensive to refine, dangerous to ship in the proposed pipeline as it can corrode the pide easily.  Again seems a cost benefit analysis needs to be done, especailly with the US have large oil reserves in shale oil.  Is that source of oil cheaper to produce thereby growing domestic oil production??  Or is it cheaper to import the oil because of other considerations, like labor and environmental regulations?

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Neal G. Lineback's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:51 AM

This is a Geography in the News dealing with the background of the Keystone pipeline proposal and Canadian tar sands.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that mother nature can and will destroy just about anything that we can build.  We know where there are flood plains and we know that flooding will occur.  What we might not know, fail to see, or just completely ignore, is how devestating these floods can become.  It seems to be a cost benefit analysis.  Cheaper to build and rebuild rather than building somewhere else maybe??  Does it seem to make sense?  Why are they still ancient Roman works still standing, and in use today?  Did they just build it better or did they just build in the right location??

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is change is the immigration from Mexico will also change the deographics of the area into which they are moving.  Higher incomes, more businesses, more employment in that area that will hopefully spread to other areas.  This is an unforseen result of the drug wars and although it is a positive result, the violence will need to stop.  As it improves the economic situation in the US it worses in the area of Mexico where these type of people are needed.  Legitimate businesses are leaving Mexico leaving a vacume that is going to be filled by the cartels, which will make the problems grow.  While this is a postive for the US in the areas where they are moving to, it is also a negative for Mexico and in the long run a negative for the US.

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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 21, 2012 3:27 PM
This story reminds me of the Dutch Africans who moved from their settlements and went futher into the country to avoid British colonalism. Although far apart and not the same conditions i found the migration of the people to be similar in comparison with the affulnt Mexicans that are afriad for their safety. The people are so afriad for their lives that there willing to leave everything and move just to preserve there life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. I have no problem with this group of people migrating to the U.S because if they stay the powerful drug cartel will harress them and kill them.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 3:02 PM

This article is about a recent rise in affluent Mexicans immigrating to the United States to escape the drug war violence in Mexico. These wealthy Mexican immigrants are in stark contrast to the stereotype of the poor illegal-boarder-crossing Mexican immigrant. They come to the United States and live in expensive homes, drive fancy cars, and invest in business. While these immigrants are a boon to the United States economy, Mexico is losing some of the most important citizens; the ones with the wealth to create jobs.

 

The article highlights just how damaging the drug cartels are to Mexico's future.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

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Hundreds of Colorado flooding victims stranded, awaiting rescue

Hundreds of Colorado flooding victims stranded, awaiting rescue | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More heavy rain is expected today in Colorado where rescue workers are battling to reach hundred of residents cut off by the worst floods in decades, which have killed at least four people and left many still unaccounted for.
Al Picozzi's insight:

All of the rain in flooding happening here just reminds me of the floods we had in Cranston in 2010.  I know it is not on the same scale but it still reminds me off how much was lost in a small city in RI.  Also, all the forest fires this year in that region contributed to the flooding as there were alot fewer trees, as well as damaged soil, to absorb the water and rainfall. 

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Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing

Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
With the slight resurgence of U.S. manufacturing in the recent years—termed a potential "manufacturing moment" by some—it is important to consider not just the future of manufacturing in America but also its geography.

 

This interactive map is brimming with potential to both teach and learn about the changing industrial geographies of the United States.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that there still is manufacturing in the US given all the news about it moving to China and other countries.  As the map shows there still is big manufacturing in east of the Mississippi and then manily along the West Coast.  I really thing the US as a whole needs to get back to basics.  Manufacturing is what made this country strong, and I believe that a strong manufacturing sector with a strong services sector will help this country grow.

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US shale oil threatens to derail OPEC's future

US shale oil threatens to derail OPEC's future | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The rise of North American oil supplies could test the future of OPEC which may have to curb supply to accommodate rising shale oil volumes, a new report has found.
Al Picozzi's insight:

The rise of the US in producing oil, especailly shale oil,  coupled with the difficulties of OPEC countries in actually producing the oil my lead to lower demand for foregin oil in the US.  From someone who remembers the gas lines of the 70s this is a great development.  It also can mean new jobs in a new industry.  Question is how long can this resource last, and what are the evironmental impacts of this new technology? 

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