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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing the amout of people Stalin sent to the gulags as politucal prisoners.  He even sent his own soldiers to them if they were captured and held in German POWs camps.  He though with them just evein seeing the west would lessen his hold.  Completely changed the ethnic geography of Soviet Russia

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:43 AM

Stalin probably did not have the outlook of his country's geography in mind when he deported all of these people.  It goes to show that ruthless dictatorships are never the way to go, as impulsive decisions and tyranny can have consequences for the long term.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 10:09 PM

This article details the ethnic deportation of peoples during the Soviet era. Many peoples were relocated under the guise of creating an ethnically unified Soviet Union but the truth was while some of the deportations were to simply move workers places of planned industry, many were to exile those deemed enemies of the state. The article estimates over 40% of those relocated died of diseases, malnutrition, or mistreatment. These forced migrations changed the demographics of Eastern Europe and Asia while causing major conflicts between various ethnic groups and Russia.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 6:22 AM

This article describes the practice of Lenin and Stalin of Russifacation.  This policy led to many ethnic minorities with in the Soviet Union being deported from their home soil to the interior of Russia.  The aim was to place ethnic Russian in boarder areas and to bring the ‘undesirable’ ethnicity into the interior to become Russian or sent to the gulags to die.  The effects of this mass relocation of ethnicity is still being felt today.  The rising conflict in Ukraine is a direct result from these policies as the country is split between ethnic Ukraine and the decedents of the ethnic Russians move there to secure the ports to the Black Sea.

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A House United

A House United | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Why analysts touting Ukraine's East-West division are just plain wrong."

 

This neat picture [of East/West divisions] becomes muddled in the environs of Luhansk and Donetsk. For example, the official website of the Bilokurakyn district of Luhansk province (which borders Russia) is in Ukrainian, and the website's sentiments are distinctly anti-Yanukovych. The countryside and smaller towns of both provinces tend to speak Ukrainian and practice Ukrainian culture. And even in the cities themselves, the vast majority of the population -- minus the pro-Russian chauvinists -- will happily engage Ukrainian speakers in conversation. One Ukrainian history professor at Donetsk State University has been conducting all his lectures in Ukrainian for over a decade. At first some students grumbled -- and he responded by pointing out that if they lack the intellectual ability to understand Ukrainian, they shouldn't be university students. Since then, there have been no complaints and no problems.


Go to Lviv in the West, and you encounter similar subtleties.  The vast majority of Lviv residents are at least proficient in Russian, gladly speak the language, read Russian newspapers and books, and watch Russian television. If a radio is playing in a restaurant or café, chances are as high that it'll be tuned to a Russian station rather than a Ukrainian one. Lviv is especially popular with Russian tourists, who like it for its Middle European feel, old architecture, and Ukrainian distinctiveness. A favorite Russian watering hole is the Kryyivka (Bunker) restaurant, modeled after the underground hideouts used by anti-Soviet Ukrainian nationalists after World War II.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Still a hot spot in Eastern Europe even after the split of the Soviet Union.  The people are split as who to go with the EU, NATO, the West on one side vs. Russia on the other.  As a former Soviet republic there are still strong ties to Russia but many feel they are being sold out by their leaders to the Russians.  Some also feel the West is just interested in the gas and oil that is flowing through their country from Russia....they feel they are being played by both sides...hmmm seems like the cold war again...what do you think?

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Its amazing to see what goes into one jar of a really good product.  My kids love this stuff and I used it on toast as a kid also.  Amazing to see where the ingrediants come from, when it has to go to be all put together and then after than where it has to go to be shipped worldwide.  Lots of globalization goig on in one little jar of Nutella.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:35 AM

great for unit on globalisation and fair trade

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 10:26 AM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 12:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

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Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  All links archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I really could see the idea of island biogeography when looking at islands and the ocean and how they species could develop that way.  Until I saw this video I do not think I could have made that cross over to continents.  Now I do see it.  If we build something across an open plain it will effect how species roam the area.  I remeber seeing pictures of the Alaskan pipeline raised in certain area and could not until now figure out why.  Now I know it was done, at least partly for, environmental reasons. So animals could still travel under it in order to move about.  If not Alaska would have been cut in half and prevented the animals form moving across the pipeline.  So as nature effected the developement of species with the rising and falling of ocean levels and islands, human effect the developmentof species with roads, farms and cities to name just a few.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:35 AM

I find the island biogeography to be really awesome because it's as if the small South Pacific islands are a completely separate world in terms of the creatures that live in the isolated environments.  Growing up, the idea of the Komodo Dragon was terrifying and amazing because lizards are just supposed to be little, ugly reptiles and the existence of one large enough to eat us and named after the beasts in fairytales was fascinating.  In Rhode Island, there isn't much in terms of exotic wildlife but even the species throughtout the rest of the U.S. don't completely compare to the rare creatures on the islands that have adapted to the conditions of living on small pieces of land.

The land bridge is something I don't recall ever hearing of before and the way that it influences the animals' evolution and expansion is fascinating.  I think of it in terms of humans because when immigrants cross seas to go to different countries, they are forced to adapt and they're families evolve differently than they would have in their homeland. The land bridge provided similar challenges for the marsupials and reptiles that are/were located on the secluded islands.

Once again, I also find myself extremely annoyed with man's habit of killing off rare species for the selfish reasons of owning land and not being hunted by the animals whose land they've encroached upon.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 5:04 PM

This video presentation gives a good description of why islands have a varied and different forms of species on the islands.  The isolation gives them a strong hold in their particular environment but this is a double edged sword because they lack predation or stronger comparators so they become very adapted to their place but cannot compete when a stronger adaptor for generalized environment comes to the island.  Like cats that are brought to the isolated island and then proceed to cause mass extinctions.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:03 PM

Just because the world island is in island biogeography doesn't mean it is only to be discussed and looked at on islands. There is great importance of exploring this specific part of geography on land that is not solely surrounded by water.

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Nelson Mandela, South African Icon of Peaceful Resistance, Is Dead

Nelson Mandela, South African Icon of Peaceful Resistance, Is Dead | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Mr. Mandela’s decades in prison and insistence on forgiveness over vengeance made him a potent symbol of the struggle to end his country’s system of racial domination.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Dont't know if anyone has seen this yet, but the world lost a great man today.  To come to power after all the persecution he and his people suffered and not take revenge, but adopt a policy of forgiveness and to move on to better his country just shows what an amzing man he was.

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Mount Dixon Explodes!

Mount Dixon Explodes! | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
An initial analysis of the Mount Dixon landslide in New Zealand on Monday

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just an incredible sight to see.  The helicopter video is truly an amazing must see for anyone.  Just to imagine what it would be like to be there when it happened.  The speed at whcih the landslide moved plus the sounds it must have made would have been a once and a lifetime even, but if you were that close when it happened, it might be the end of your lifetime...what a way to go!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 24, 2013 7:52 PM

There are some great images (and a post-landslide helicopter flight video) of the massive landslide that occurred Jan 21, 2013.  The rockslide extends over 3 km, with an elevation change of approximately 800 meters.  This is an excellent example to help students visualize mass wasting, alpine glaciation and erosion in general.  While the mountain didn't explode strictly speaking, I couldn't help but love the headline "Mount Dixon explodes!"    


Tags: New Zealand, physical, geomorphology, erosion.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 7:49 AM

Mount Dixon's landslide is due to the mountain itself being unstable. The landslide pattern is normal in retrospect to other landslides that have happened over the years. The before and after pictures are a clear depiction of the landslide path from top to bottom.

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Such an incredible sight to see.  The amount of bio-diversity located in the Great Barrier Reef is just astounding.  No wonder people feel this is an asset to keep.  Not only will it bring in toursim and the money that goes along with it, the toursim will help keep the area clean for the government will not want to lose the billions of dollars they earn from tourism.  Ecologically the preservation of this area will benefit not only the natural wildlife there, but it will benefit the people.  Even if it is a bit selfish to keep it preserved for monetary reasons, at least it is still being preserved.

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 10:18 AM

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world, and the ecosystem that exists there is extremely delicate, as well as extremely fantastic, as seen in this article.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:41 PM

When I first saw this image I thought that this white shark was swimming into a chest or something anything except for another shark. Then when opening the article it was apparent that the shark was being eaten by another shark. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 2:57 PM

A wobbegong, also known as the carpet shark, engulfs a bamboo shark in the Great Barrier Reef. This was a surprising and rare photo for Divers in Australia. It is crazy how animals so close in relativity can instantly become predators, and possibly a meal, to each other!

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Indonesia's Mount Sinabung volcano erupts 6 more times

Indonesia's Mount Sinabung volcano erupts 6 more times | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Powerful bursts of hot ash and gravel erupted from a rumbling volcano in western Indonesia early Monday, sending panicked villagers streaming down the sides of the mountain.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A small story on the continued eruptions of this volcano in Indonesia.  Some of the pictures shown in this article show why this area is called the ring of fire.  These have a been a series of eruptions over the last week or so and has actually caused flight to be diverted, much the the eruption on Iceland in 2010.  Amazing set of pictures seen in this article.

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Floods Show What Lies Ahead for Sinking Bangkok

Floods Show What Lies Ahead for Sinking Bangkok | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Thai capital, built on swampland, is slowly sinking and the floods in Bangkok could be merely a foretaste of a grim future as climate change makes its...

 

If 'natural' disasters are becoming more fierce and impacting human societies more, we need to ask ourselves: are the physical geographic systems shifting independently or is it human society that is causing the changes?  Is it the force of the hurricanes, earthquakes, floods etc. that have intensified or is the way within which humans live on the land that make us more susceptible and vulnerable to the effects of these disasters?    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that sinking cities is not just a problem for Venice.  As the cities grow larger and more and more land is needed, small cities that were built on unstable land are now larger.  These new cities cannot  be supported by the land they were originally built on.  As the natural disasters occur, and we know they will, they are intensified by the fact that a city has grown and more people are there.  There will always be natural disasters, but when a major flood hits and unpopulated area it is still a natural disaster just not on the same scale as hitting a city that is overpopulated or built up to a point where the land it is on just can't support it.  It is the human part of the disaster that makes it much more then just a natural disaster.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 3:17 PM

This situation with Bangkok is the same problem that New Orleans is facing. Building on lands that used to get regular deposits of silt is a bad idea. The ground not only continues to compact and essentially "sink" but the planet is covered in water that changes level regularly. Unfortunately, New Orleans has shown that levees don't really work and the earth will always reclaim the land it wants back.

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just seems to be a pattern with any mega city.  People move to the city for a better life.  Even though there is overcrowding and lack of infrastructure in these growing cities they feel it is a better life than the rural areas.  They still need the infrastructure from the government but this group has been training the people there to go and make the changes for themselves oh what they can control.  They are giving them the skills they need to make changes.  They now need to use those skills to get the government to make the necessary infrastructure changes that the government knows are needed.  They know the people are flooding to the cities and they see the promblem, but nothing wil be done until the people demand the changes that are necessary.  It can happen, might take time but it can happen..just ask the Romanov family of Russia..oh wait..they are not there...

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2:16 PM

In megacities, such as Jakarta, urbanization brings about many problems for local residents. The areas are crowded and residents get little to no income. An Australian organization works to help the people of Jakarta by giving them advice,food and helping where necessary. With this help, families are able to keep their spirits higher and hope that their children will live better lives than the ways that they were brought up.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 5:10 PM

Jakarta is the capitol of Indonesia and now has a population of over 28 million. Urbanization is bringing serious problems to Indonesia’s only mega city, such as poor access to clean water and housing, and overpopulation. Some people, including the young woman in this video are living with 16 or more people in one house. It seems the city is not providing enough affordable housing for its residents.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 11:25 AM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

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Americans remember where they were when JFK was shot

Americans remember where they were when JFK was shot | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The axiom is that everyone of his generation knows just where they were when they heard Kennedy was shot. The reality is that many also recall precisely how it felt as word broke, in a staccato series of news bulletins.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Fifty years ago on this exact day and date, November 22, 1963 was also a Friday, President John F Kennedy was assassinated at Dealey Plaza, Dallas Texas at about 12:30pm.  Fifty years ago seems like a long time but this even is still burned into the memories of somany Americans.  Events like this are linked to geography in the sense, like the article states, people remeber where they where when they head the news.  Both of my parents, my Mom was 21 and my Dad was 19 when this happedened, know exactly where they were to the spot when this happened.  However, like most people they will not remeber where they went last year on a regular day.  We attach a place to the event that was so big.  Both my parents were at work, their first real jobs out of high school.  This happeneds to this day, I can remeber where I was exactly when the shuttle Challeneger exploded in 1986, Jan 28, 1986. I was in Cranston, RI in my then Junion High School biology class, and when the World Trade Center was attacked on 9/11/01, I was in Warwick RI getting ready for work.  Like most people I remember those days like I had just left there but I can't remember where I even went two weeks ago.  We attach specific places to serious event that have hapened in our life.  The big question is Why?????? As we try to answer that just take time today to rember JKF and what some see was the end of American innocence.

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The use of this commerical to promote a reunification is a great idea.  It starts as a small step and then ideas just grow.  As this gets more play in India, the idea spreads and in a country of over 1 billion when it spreads...it spreads.  Reminds me of Berlin. A city so long ago split and then reunited in 1989 with the physical wall mainly coming down in 1990 and then Germany reuniting in 1990.  It started small over time, 30 years or so.  Now I know India and Pakistan were split in 1947 and Germany effectively in 1945 witht he wall coming up in 1961.  This is a bit different I know, the division is mainly on religious differences, however it usually takes small actions for things to get started.  Will a reunifiction happenin my lifetime, no, in my kids....maybe.  Is this commerical for Google that one small step?

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:46 PM

I watched this short commercial with my geography class. While watching, you could almost forget that it was only a commercial. The commercial brings up that the internet can be a great tool in finding information. It also shows that the internet breaks down boundaries that had been impossible to get over physically.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 12:59 AM

These ads reflect the changing culture of India. There is a more progressive culture taking hold which is quite possibly caused by the effects of globalization. Along with India's industrialization, technology is a factor in the culture change. Taboo topics, like remarriage and the partition with Pakistan, are being used by advertisers be provocative without being offensive to most people.

 

The culture of India will undoubtedly be affected by its media representing more progressive ideas as well. Repeated exposure to these ideas will create new generations of Indians more comfortable with remarriage, much like newer generations in the United States are more comfortable with gay marriage.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:21 PM

Commercials work even when they don't. When its an annoying commercial, everyone still remembers exactly what the commercial is for. What Google does here is brilliant. This is very powerful and the reunited states could be an idea to get used to.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  With no saftey regulations to go by, nor any labor unions to file greviences for bad working conditions, and unsafe for that matter, its no wonder they can be on budget and of course this will give them a competitive edge.  If they can do it cheaper it will cost less than anyone else can do it for, and everyone knows governments will always go the cheapest route.  The labor cost is so much lower in China, think no safety regulaitons or government watchdog like OSHA, that it is cheaper to make it there and ship it across the globe.  They really have no regard for worker safety in any industry, this video just shows that even in construction, or destruction, there is no concern for the workers...interesting coming from a Communist country where the worker was supposed to be the most important person, over the capitalists.  Hmmm makes you think....

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:13 PM

This video is jaw-dropping proof of how China cuts corners in their quest for growing their economy. With such a large population looking for work China does not really need to protect their workers. I wonder if China will experience a labor movement similar to the one in the US that introduced protective legislation.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 6:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is amazing to see a city grow like this and the issues it can create.  There is no city planning involved and by need these "slums" spring up all over the sprawling landscape.  People are moving into Dhaka from the rural areas because these areas have suffered from one natural disaster or another and because the poverty there is immense.  Even though there is poverty in these slums, right next to the "richer" side of the city, the life is still better an there is hope that it will be better here than in the rural areas. The government knows that this is happening and that is has been happening for decades, but has still done nothing in that time ti make the situation better.  In fact becasue of this lack of action, for decades, the problems have been made exponentially worse and will continue this way as more and more people move into the city.  Lack of accountability of the government to its people is one main casue of this.  It is so inefficient that each offical blames the other or states that they are not the one to blame and it is some other offical's problem.  How could this have been avoided?  When the problem first arose, coudl have it been avoided if action was taken right away?  What if there was some urban planning?  Is this a result of only recently, 1971, becoming an independant country and not having the experience in city planning?  Could the blame be put on the British, the former colonial rulers of this entire area?  Could the division of this area by the British also be the cause?  There are many questions that could be asked.  One thing I do know, a sprawl like this is just not sustainable unless the infrastructure is done.  It can lead to disease, think crowed, Middle Age, Westen European cities overrun with the bubonic plague, lead to civil strife, riots, they already riot with water shortages, and outright revolts.  Another question, Can we learn from this pattern?  As the video suggests this is a global pattern as more and more people move into these Megacities.  Should we all start planning now for a bigger New York, Los Angeles, Mexico City etc.?  Well if we don't want to repeat history, we should start planning now and work on the infrastructure now..that leads to my last question...who pays for it????

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:21 AM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 8:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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Rare Snowstorm Hits the Middle East

Rare Snowstorm Hits the Middle East | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Unusual cold and precipitation affected Jerusalem and surrounding areas
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just looking at this picture is amazing.  Seems everybody is getting some snow this season.  The Western Wall and the Dome of the Rock are both covered in snow. A strange storm in the Middle East that also dumped some snow in Cario and Alexandria in Egypt.  It even put a stop to the fighting in Syrian at Aleppo for aong with the snow the tempertures in these are are right around 0.......global warming anyone???!!!  Going to be an interesting year!

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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Hiding their idenity to get a job or to even live.  Much like many Jewish people did to survive in Hitler's Germany.  They pretened to be Catholic, Protestant anything but Jewish.  They did what they had to do to survive. The same is gong on in India, not on the scale of genocide, concentration camps, forced labor, etc., but it still is a form of opperession of a minority group in the largest "democracy" in the world.  It dates back to the partitiion of India after British rule.  Many Muslims were forced to migrated to what was then either West or East Pakistan, which is now Bangledesh.  Not all left.  There are about 127,000,000 Muslims in Indian manking it the second largest population of Muslims behind Indonesia, that is a sizeable minority even in a country of over 1 billion.  The nation overall would benefit from equality in the job maket in that there probably many skilled workers in a basically untouched labor pool.  The US has regulations against hiring practices based on one's religious belief, as well as age, gender, race etc., it is something that India might take an example from.  I know the US isn't perfect on its labor relations in the past, but we have been doing a good job as of late...though there are still lingering issues that will be solved giving time.  I tink its time for India to start becasue it will take a long time for things to change when they at least started.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:16 AM

It is sad that this kind of discrimination exists in the world. I will never understand how the religion you follow affects how you wash the dishes or cook the food while you are at work.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:46 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

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Pearl Harbor memories fading with time

Pearl Harbor memories fading with time | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
You could hardly escape reminders of it during World War II. And over the course of decades since, Dec. 7 has meant one thing to generations of Americans: Pearl Harbor. Unprovoked attack.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just a small reminder of what today is and what it means to many Americans.  My grandparents told me about this when they were alive.  How unexpected it was, how shocking it was and how angry they, as well as many Americans were.  My grandparents have all passed away, but I made sure I told my kids about the importance of this day.  It is something that never should be forgotten.  This act reunited a nation in one common cause that I do not think has happened again.  There was only one purpose after December 7, 1941....to win a war that we did not start.

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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Never really understood how island chains were made until now.  As the plate moves the iland is no longer growing and it begins to erode as a new island is created for the hotspot doesn't move the plate does.  That explains why the island of Hawaii is the largest island in the Hawaiian Island Chain..it is the yourgest island and the one the is currently under the hotspot...until it moves along the plate..which I do not believe will be in anyones life time.  It also helps explain how atolls were formed.  The plate moved so the island was no longer growing and though erosion of hundreds of thousands of years the center of the large island is gone while the ring is being supported by a coral reef.  Great site that really makes it easy to understand.

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Moisés González Pérez's curator insight, May 29, 2013 12:02 PM

It is a good video which explain how can be formed a group of islands under a hot spot. This example is valid not only for Hawaii but for the Canary Islands.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 11:09 AM

This video explains the geology of hotspots which are how many of the islands in the Pacific Ocean are formed. Convection of solid, hot material rises to the tectonic plate where it is trapped, heating the rock above to its melting point. The heat then forces the molten rock to the surface where it cools and creates volcanoes. Over millions of years, the tectonic plate drifts, but the hot spot does not, causing a series of volcanoes on the surface. The Hawaiian Islands were formed by this process, which is why the islands progress from large to small, with the smallest islands being the oldest, in the process of eroding completely away.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 3:23 PM

This video entails that mantel and where a hotspot for a volcanic eruption will take place. This video depicts the way at which a hot spot is located and what makes it erupt and cause an eruption in the firt place. It goes step by step ways to see the many different forms of volcanoes and where they start and end up at.

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:03 AM

This is an interesting article.  I knew of the International Date Line, but I did not know anything about it or what it meant.  It is a line that is roughly opposite the Prime Meridian that when crossed, the day advances forward, from Monday to Tuesday for example.  The line is interesting because it is meant to not stir any problems.  It goes through Siberia and the North Pacific Ocean since virtually no one lives in those areas.  Even though less people live in the Pacific and South Pacific Islands than say, Europe and Africa or North and South America, people still do live here and they are negatively affected by the date line.  American Samoa and Samoa, two islands made up of the same ethnic groups, are separated by the date line.  Being separated by time zones affecting people by a few hours seems bad enough, but being separated by an entire day just does not work for many people.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 2:42 AM

This line clearly needs to be redrawn.  It just does not make sense that it could be monday in one area and tuesday 50 miles directly south of it.  While the new dateline does not necessarily have to be perfectly straight, it should at least not go directly horizontal as it does now.  Whoever lies on the line must deal with whatever place they have been placed in, and not complain.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:05 AM

My class examined this and we agree that it makes sense that American Samoa would want to be those they do business with like Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  ALthough American Samoa is a US territory, it definately does more business with the countries who are nearby and therefore they should be pushed to the other side of the dateline.

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2010: Lost WWII battlefield found -– war dead included. Remained untouched since 1942 - WAR HISTORY ONLINE

2010: Lost WWII battlefield found -– war dead included. Remained untouched since 1942 - WAR HISTORY ONLINE | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
An Australian trekker said he has discovered the site of a significant World War II battle in the jungles of Papua New Guinea, complete with the remains of Japanese soldiers right where they fell almost 70 years ago.

Via Graeme Hosken
Al Picozzi's insight:

An amazing discovery that was left alone since 1942.  You have to remember in this part of the South Pacific there was major fighting in this area.  The Battle of the Coral Sea and Guadalcanal were very important turning points in World War II.  The British and the Australians, mainly the Australians, stopped the Japanese advance on their march to take Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea which was a majpr base which stopped the Japanese from invading Australia.  This theater of war was extremely important that covered thousands and thousands of miles, even greater than the land war on the Eastern Front.

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Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Mekong River was once a wild and primitive backwater. Today, growing demands for electricity and rapid economic growth are changing the character of what is the world's 12th-longest river.

 

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiences some impacts of globalization with residents having mixed feelings about the prospects. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 27, 2012 3:12 PM
It's sad that they have to use up this wild river. I'm not a big fan of environmental degradation but if that's what they're going to do I can't do anything about it.
Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 6:04 PM

There must be a better way to transport items and in return save the Mekong river from being degredated. Technological innovations are affecting the life in the river as local fishermen are seeing less and less fish traveling in the river. This is impacting them in the sense that they use these fish for their survival as well as for selling. They fear that in building dams and creating advanced roads over the Mekong will change their enviroment altogether and will hinder their livelihood. This is a beautiful river and I personally feel there could be a better way but there is always something sacrficed when the government choses a location to build on. - M. Carvajal

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 5:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

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Tsunami of Change Hitting Burma!

Sometimes the news can be good news! The historic April 1st election in Burma that saw Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy win 43/45 parliamentary seats is being hailed as the first free and fair elections for 50 years!

 

This is a current perspective on the many changes transforming Myanmar back into Burma.  For more by John Boyer, see: http://www.plaidavenger.com/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is amazing to see the kind of changes he has mentioned especially after military rule for about 50 years.  But you have to be careful as in all things.  Look at this article from BBC news http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12990563 Even though the changes have been made the military still holds some significant power.  It holds the most powerful ministires in the country and well as having 25%of the seats of both chambers of the parliament reserved for themselves.  In time if these restricitions are removed I think that sanctions could be removed a little at a time.

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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:52 PM

Wow I think this guy may have drank way to much coffee before making this video J  He is very excited about the changes in Burma although he should be it sounds as though this country is pretty much changing overnight

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150th anniversary of Gettysburg Address

150th anniversary of Gettysburg Address | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
On the Civil War battlefield where President Abraham Lincoln gave a speech that symbolized his presidency and the sacrifices made by Union and Confederate forces, historians and everyday Americans are gathering to ponder what the Gettysburg Address...
Al Picozzi's insight:

Along with the 50th anniversary of the assination of JFK it was the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 2013.  A very impotant speech that was given on the site of the battle.  That site chosen for its significance and the importance of that battle in the US Civil War.  President Lincoln only spoke for a few minutes, against the hours of the other speakers, but his speech was the one the was most significant, not just because it was from the President, but because of the content of the speech.  If you have never read or heard the speech, please do yourself a favor and at least read it, it echoes what the feelings of the time was, it gives insights of what the Union was fighting for, what they were giving up.  In that short speech he gave President Lincoln set forth the basis for the Civil War...that all men are created equal and that the Union must be preserved.  If you want listen here for a reading of the Gettsburg Address.  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1512410

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Son says US war vet father, 85, detained by NKorea

Son says US war vet father, 85, detained by NKorea | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The son of an 85-year-old American veteran of the Korean War says his father was detained in North Korea as he sat in a plane set to leave the country.
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Korean War never end.  Only an armistice was signed not a peace treaty.  Seems the North sees this 85 year old US veteran as a threat.  This area is the home to the worlds most heavily defended border in the world.  All you need is a spark to set it off.  The missle tests, the nuclear program, the human rights violations and now the detaining of a US veteran that happened a month ago and still no word on the man.  Seems that a spark might be coming.  Let's all hope it doesn't.

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Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs

Gold rush-era discards could fuel cellphones, TVs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 22, 2013 2:13 PM

Getting someting from the old gold-rush era miners.  The rare earth elements are in high demand today becasue of the use of these elements in modern technology.  Old gold mine are being examined to be reopened as rare earth element mine.  China at the moment is the largest miner of these elements and are charging a ton of money for them.  According to the article they cut off supplies of some to Japan because of a dispute over international fishing rights.  Along with oil, are these resources going to drive the future economies?  It looks like if you like smart phones and electric cars they will be.

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Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:17 PM

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.