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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great site to see how globaliztions takes a hold.  Many of the airport on the list of in the US and many are in China.  Not surprising that the two leading economic powers in the world have the busiest airports.  Also it is interening to see Las Vegas on the list.  Seems that people need a place to blow off some steam from working so hard.

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 12:03 PM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

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BBC Country Profiles

BBC Country Profiles | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
BBC Country Profiles: instant guide to history, politics and economic background of countries and territories, and background on key institutions.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 25, 2013 4:55 PM
Great site for quick info. Thanks
Sabrina Wesley's curator insight, July 26, 2013 12:53 AM

Use for History, Geography, and Math

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 30, 2013 5:06 AM

I need a one-stop shop for my classes and maybe this is it.

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

That is where I live, basic suburbia.  Good lots, lots of roads, know my neighbors without being on top of them, close to a highway to get to other places, trees that every fall I wish I didn't have up here in New England.  I am drawn to these areas.  Why? For the reasons I've stated above, I have a good yard, nice neighbors I know,not too close and not 20 miles away, close to main roads, and close to stuff, well being close in RI is relative, everything is close.  The housing here is single family with lots that cater to people with families, swing sets, pools, etc.  The layout feel like a neighborhood, its close, just the right amount of space, we help each other when needed, in the last blizzard for example, and we get together every now and then, the way the area was built, mostly in the late 1940's to the 1960's, just facilitates this kind of activity.  Was it profitable, probably, what system is most, depends on the area, a grid system for example, really could not work here.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.