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A Rhode Island School for Wayward Boys Is Itself Reformed

A Rhode Island School for Wayward Boys Is Itself Reformed | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The remains of the Sockanosset Training School for Boys in Cranston, R.I., are now the base of a development with retail, residential and commercial space.
Al Picozzi's insight:

An article from back in 2009.  Showing how Cranston was revitalizing the Sockanosset area.  These buildings were "the bad boys school" as I was told when I was growing up.  You can see the original chapel that was kept in the picture above.  The area in now complete and called Chapel Hill.  The dorms were incorporated into the new buildings to keep some of the old architecture.  There is no real downtown in Cranston.  Everytime someone says downtown one thinks of Providence.  Is this an attempt to make a downtown area in Cranston?  I do not htink so, it is an extension of the olf Garden City Shopping Center, that downtown feeling is missing to me.  However it was an attempt to revitalize the area after a number of businesses closed in Garden City.  Did it work?  Seems to be working as the area has attracted new businesses and resturants and construction is still going on!

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Waterfire downtown Providence, Rhode Island at Water Place Park

Waterfire downtown Providence, Rhode Island at Water Place Park | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Photo by Mark Corbett. Here is a photo I took in the Summer in Providence, Rhode Island at the Water Place Park during one of the Waterfire events held in Providence RI.
Al Picozzi's insight:

What is considered part of downtown Providence, RI today.  Alot different from the picture that I have scooped from 1945 Westminster Street picture.  The similarities, all the activiity, just look at the number of people at Waterplace Park.  Compare it to this picture http://blogs.providencejournal.com/ri-talks/architecture-here-there/brisprovwest.JPG of Westminster Street today.  You still see the shopper and some fo the cars, however to be the "downtown" has shifted a bit and expanded.  To me to be downtown is to be where things are happening, where people go, not just work and shop.  Waterfire is a great cultural activity that brings life to downtown, artist show their work, street performers, and just people mixing, talking, etc.  That is what downtown is to me.  It changes over time and what is downtown in Providence, RI is going to be different that what one might consider downtown in Rome, Italy, New York, NY or even Cranston, RI.

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Petula Clark - Downtown

"Downtown" is a pop song composed by Tony Hatch following a first-time visit to New York City.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Listen to this song from 1964.  Before my time but its the music my parents listened too.  It describes what it means to be downtown in 1964, where everything is, where the neon lights are, where you can forget all your troubles, go to the movie shows, and where you can listen to the "music" of the traffice of the city around you.  It tells alot about urban geography of the time, traffic, bright lights, go there to do stuff and forget about life, go to the movies, a very very active place where everybody goes.

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Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is not just human's that have to adapt to the environment.  As we have adapted to the wilderness that once existed, animals are now adapting to the new urban areas.  It is just amazing to see what these dogs can do,

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 18, 11:25 PM

This article shows how intelligent some dogs are. They are adapting to the environment around them and figuring out how to survive within the city. I give them credit, as I am sure they have their tactics to survive, whether its begging for food or traveling subways to look for food. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 8:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 11:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 10:37 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is amazing to see a city grow like this and the issues it can create.  There is no city planning involved and by need these "slums" spring up all over the sprawling landscape.  People are moving into Dhaka from the rural areas because these areas have suffered from one natural disaster or another and because the poverty there is immense.  Even though there is poverty in these slums, right next to the "richer" side of the city, the life is still better an there is hope that it will be better here than in the rural areas. The government knows that this is happening and that is has been happening for decades, but has still done nothing in that time ti make the situation better.  In fact becasue of this lack of action, for decades, the problems have been made exponentially worse and will continue this way as more and more people move into the city.  Lack of accountability of the government to its people is one main casue of this.  It is so inefficient that each offical blames the other or states that they are not the one to blame and it is some other offical's problem.  How could this have been avoided?  When the problem first arose, coudl have it been avoided if action was taken right away?  What if there was some urban planning?  Is this a result of only recently, 1971, becoming an independant country and not having the experience in city planning?  Could the blame be put on the British, the former colonial rulers of this entire area?  Could the division of this area by the British also be the cause?  There are many questions that could be asked.  One thing I do know, a sprawl like this is just not sustainable unless the infrastructure is done.  It can lead to disease, think crowed, Middle Age, Westen European cities overrun with the bubonic plague, lead to civil strife, riots, they already riot with water shortages, and outright revolts.  Another question, Can we learn from this pattern?  As the video suggests this is a global pattern as more and more people move into these Megacities.  Should we all start planning now for a bigger New York, Los Angeles, Mexico City etc.?  Well if we don't want to repeat history, we should start planning now and work on the infrastructure now..that leads to my last question...who pays for it????

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:21 PM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:18 AM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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Gentrification in overdrive on DC’s 14th Street

Gentrification in overdrive on DC’s 14th Street | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Great Recession and its messy aftermath will go into the record books for many things: jobs lost, household wealth destroyed, foreclosure auctions held.

Via Joe Andrade
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing read, especially at the end of the article, when he stated that complaints about parking is a good sign.  I bet it was not a good sign to the people that used to be there that no longer had an affordable place to live.  I understand the need to improve areas, but there has to be some thought, some, about the people that have to leave the area.

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Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:48 PM

Just another exaple of gentrification going on in the country.

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Providence, RI Downtown Providence in 1945

Providence, RI Downtown Providence in 1945 | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Main Streets of America. Westminster Street at Mathewson, looking north to Dorrance Street. This is the center of the shopping district. From the National Archives 111-SC box 692 329494.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Downtown Providence in 1945.  Look at all the activity, people shopping and walking, streetcar rails still in the street, cars parked along the side, retail shops, eating establishments, just a hub of activity.  I still think this is what it means to be downtown, an area of large activity, a place where stuff is done.  What stuff is done, is what changes over time.

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:45 AM

This is a very cool story on how things were in Providence back at the end of WW2 and how much downtown has changed and the new parts of the city look today... good stuff

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just seems to be a pattern with any mega city.  People move to the city for a better life.  Even though there is overcrowding and lack of infrastructure in these growing cities they feel it is a better life than the rural areas.  They still need the infrastructure from the government but this group has been training the people there to go and make the changes for themselves oh what they can control.  They are giving them the skills they need to make changes.  They now need to use those skills to get the government to make the necessary infrastructure changes that the government knows are needed.  They know the people are flooding to the cities and they see the promblem, but nothing wil be done until the people demand the changes that are necessary.  It can happen, might take time but it can happen..just ask the Romanov family of Russia..oh wait..they are not there...

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:16 PM

In megacities, such as Jakarta, urbanization brings about many problems for local residents. The areas are crowded and residents get little to no income. An Australian organization works to help the people of Jakarta by giving them advice,food and helping where necessary. With this help, families are able to keep their spirits higher and hope that their children will live better lives than the ways that they were brought up.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 8:10 PM

Jakarta is the capitol of Indonesia and now has a population of over 28 million. Urbanization is bringing serious problems to Indonesia’s only mega city, such as poor access to clean water and housing, and overpopulation. Some people, including the young woman in this video are living with 16 or more people in one house. It seems the city is not providing enough affordable housing for its residents.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

That is where I live, basic suburbia.  Good lots, lots of roads, know my neighbors without being on top of them, close to a highway to get to other places, trees that every fall I wish I didn't have up here in New England.  I am drawn to these areas.  Why? For the reasons I've stated above, I have a good yard, nice neighbors I know,not too close and not 20 miles away, close to main roads, and close to stuff, well being close in RI is relative, everything is close.  The housing here is single family with lots that cater to people with families, swing sets, pools, etc.  The layout feel like a neighborhood, its close, just the right amount of space, we help each other when needed, in the last blizzard for example, and we get together every now and then, the way the area was built, mostly in the late 1940's to the 1960's, just facilitates this kind of activity.  Was it profitable, probably, what system is most, depends on the area, a grid system for example, really could not work here.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It hard to report rape cases even here in the US.  It must be ten fold that in places like India, and much of the middle east, where women traditionally in thse areas of the world as always been in a lower status of men.  The women for years, for generations in fact have always been told that their place in lower than that of men. That if something happened to them it must be their fault.  However with globalization and access to the world as a whole, women, and the men, of these societies have been shown that this is not what it is like in the rest of the world.  The women do not have to accept what they have been told even though it has been drilled into their head over and over.  With women in India inceasing their percentage in the workforce, and being education this extreme situation is going to slowly change.  There have been alot of negative aspects of globalization, this however may well be one of the postive aspects of globalization, especially to the women in the areas of the world where this type of behavior is all too common. 

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:50 AM

The rapid modernization of India along with the rural attitudes and male centric society makes it difficult for women who are raped to get justice.  Mostly because to come forward as a rape victim will take their honor away.  If they have to admit it happened then their lives will be ruined.  Even when their family stands behind them, the women are in fear and one almost killed herself because she felt pressured to testify.  The men who rape these women are from the small villages around the area and feel free to do as they please because they do not fear that their victims will report the abuse.  Things will not change until attitudes towards women and rape change in this area. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
An unfinished skyscraper occupied by squatters is a symbol of Venezuela’s financial crisis in the 1990s, state control of the economy and a housing shortage.

 

This skyscraper that was once a symbol of wealth, in an incredible paradigm shift, has now become is occupied by squatters. The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with problems in the rural countryside. A complex web of geographic factors needs to be explained to understand this most fascinating situation. The video link "Squatters on the Skyline" embedded in the article is a must see.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

An example of people doing what they need to do to live.  Some people look to the US and its system of captialism that say that is the cause of our issues, homelessness which is one of the issues.  But the Chevez, who has now died, government, which has critizied the US for not helping its poor, has the same issues, in a more government controlled economy.  All types of governements have their issues and it is not limited to just the US, China, Russia and so on.  Alot of people claimed Chevez to be an englighted leader, staning up to the US and providing for his people, however the reality is for him, and for all societies, not everything is perfect and  every country in every region has issues that need to be handeled.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM

The video we watched of the squatters living in an unfinished skyscraper was unlike anything I've ever seen before. In a country with such high population rates and a housing shortage, people have gotten creative and made homes in this 45 story building where they share what would have been office spaces and bathrooms.  Over 2,500 people have moved into the dilapidated skyscraper and made a home out of it for their families. They have rigged electricity that the government does not provide for them and built small stores on almost every floor.  The people have not been evicted because the government of Venezuela knows of the housing shortages, yet does not fix it.  

I feel ashamed that a country with so many oil resources has such high rates of poverty and no one is fixing it.  It shows the corruption in the government through an extreme although innovative example.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."