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Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas Headlines, News, The Philippine Star

Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas Headlines, News, The Philippine Star | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Japan announced that it will send 1,000 of its servicemen to join relief efforts for the victims of super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Visayas.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just something to show how the world is responding and how times have changed.  The last time the Japanese military came to the Philippines was as invaders in 1941and left with MacArthur's return in 1944.  Ironic that the Typhoon hit the area close by Red Beach where MacArthur came ashore to fullfill his "I shall return" promise.  This just shows how times have changed and former enemies can come together in a time of need.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 16, 2013 8:27 PM

Japan is going to send 1,000 troops to the philippines to help bring relief along with numerous amounts of supplies. It just shows how much the world can come together to help one country during a great time in need. 

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The devestation is just incredible and almost unbelievable.  It really shows just how we are at the mercy of nature no matter how we try to change our environment.  The technology is also incredible.  Not 10 years ago what we see now instantly would have taken alot longer.  This can also help the international rescue effort in going to where they are needed the most.  Having this information is priceless.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 10:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.