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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I love the iconic opening of this video clip with the Indiana Jones movie clip which I actually saw at a drive in, yes I'm that old.  Great how we can use technology to find these area that might have gone undiscovered.  As a history guy the implications of using this technology in finding out about the pass is exciting with limitless possibilities.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help

Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
From San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., requests for assistance have become a drain on the resources of fire departments in cities on the United States border with Mexico.

 

This is a poignant example of how site and situation impact the local geographic factors. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

These border towns should be getting some help from the federal government.  They handle ther calls of all the border medical emergencies from immigrants, both legal and illegal, and from people who left the US to live better in Mexico, but return to the US for medical care and suffer an "event" at the border to get to the hospital faster.  It also hurts the towns own citizens as sometimes these small towns only have one emergency vechile to do all the calls.  Maybe they should be given a grant to expand their emergency services since alot of the calls they take are from a federal source, ie border control.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:05 PM

This is one factor I never thought about before reading the article. Borders are one of the defining concepts of what constitutes a nation, and yet in emergencies these boundaries can become much more fluid. Of course borders in the first place are a human creation, but I imagine that along any border in the world, someone in dire need would want to get to the closest hospital, even if they're crossing a border to do so. At this point the idea of the authority implicated alongside borders might begin to seem less important. Though this makes me wonder if there are some locations which have international treaties so that local foreign departments may cross the border to help.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 2014 4:43 PM

Medical expenses are a burden on millions of people each and every year. With conditions like this on the border there is no wonder why the Calimex fire department and responders needed funds. They also need to do something about the conditions on the California/Mexican border.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 3, 2015 1:18 PM

After reading this article I think there should be some type of health service at the border, using the fire trucks and ambulance as a taxi is unacceptable. If people crossing the border do not have health care as stated that some done, the ambulance and fire trucks should not have to cover the cost, money should be given to those fire stations across the border and without help the departments might run into some trouble.

 In San Diego more than half of the calls that the department receives comes from the port which is equivalent to the state borders. Are people seriously that desperate for a way to get across the border quicker? 

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...