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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Regional Geography
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Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map

Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
No one quite agrees on what counts as America's "Midwest," but its pattern of urbanization is one of a kind.

Via John Blunnie, Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It really is hard to determine the regions as everyone has their own ideas and opinions of what consititues a region.  Some I think are easy because they have been set in history, like New England. It is the six north east states that has long been set in history.  However something like the South is hard to define.  Is Texas the south becasue it fought with the south in the Civil War or is it part of the west because it is west of the Mississippi? 

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 27, 2013 5:49 PM

Article on what American's consider the "midwest". Its interesting how different people can view were a region is when it has no official boundaries.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 10:30 AM

Regions can have very nebulous borders...the Midwest is a perfect example of a vernacular region with as many different borders as there are people to draw them. 


Mark Solomon's curator insight, August 21, 2013 10:31 AM

The American Midwest is a good example of a vernacular region, as it is perceived in different ways by many different people as an important part of their cultural history.

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:18 PM

Makes you think about the political and economic influences on just about anything. What time or day it is is an important element to a global economy. Know when business deals can be made in an instance knowing what standards are most efficient can alter systems of dating. That is why instead of having a straight line the line is jutting out in spots. Usually we think of our time zones being dependent on where the sun in relation to our location but in this instance we see that it is merely a man made line that can be altered. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 1:06 PM

This is to me the coolest geographic location in the World... A group of islands nation located in both the south and north hemispheres and also to both the east and west of the international time line zone.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 2015 8:06 PM

500 birthdays were taken away due to an international date line. In Samoa is in a confused state between the united states and the Asian pacific side of the timeline which would cause time and dates to be confusing.Dynamic economic networks and political allegiances have created a very difficult situation for the people near the border in Samoa.  The International Date line in Samoa is something that is needed to be watched and paid attention because it can affect people in ways that can be very significant even at a small tiny rate.

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Love these maps.  Bubbler is so right in RI and I never knew it was called that anywhere else.  However I think they got the one about the subs wrong.  I still call those sandwhiches a grinder.  I went to Texas once and ask for a grinder and I still think the guy there is laughing at me to this day.  Its really is great to see the difference though even though this is one country with many different backgrounds.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders.