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A House United

A House United | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Why analysts touting Ukraine's East-West division are just plain wrong."

 

This neat picture [of East/West divisions] becomes muddled in the environs of Luhansk and Donetsk. For example, the official website of the Bilokurakyn district of Luhansk province (which borders Russia) is in Ukrainian, and the website's sentiments are distinctly anti-Yanukovych. The countryside and smaller towns of both provinces tend to speak Ukrainian and practice Ukrainian culture. And even in the cities themselves, the vast majority of the population -- minus the pro-Russian chauvinists -- will happily engage Ukrainian speakers in conversation. One Ukrainian history professor at Donetsk State University has been conducting all his lectures in Ukrainian for over a decade. At first some students grumbled -- and he responded by pointing out that if they lack the intellectual ability to understand Ukrainian, they shouldn't be university students. Since then, there have been no complaints and no problems.


Go to Lviv in the West, and you encounter similar subtleties.  The vast majority of Lviv residents are at least proficient in Russian, gladly speak the language, read Russian newspapers and books, and watch Russian television. If a radio is playing in a restaurant or café, chances are as high that it'll be tuned to a Russian station rather than a Ukrainian one. Lviv is especially popular with Russian tourists, who like it for its Middle European feel, old architecture, and Ukrainian distinctiveness. A favorite Russian watering hole is the Kryyivka (Bunker) restaurant, modeled after the underground hideouts used by anti-Soviet Ukrainian nationalists after World War II.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Still a hot spot in Eastern Europe even after the split of the Soviet Union.  The people are split as who to go with the EU, NATO, the West on one side vs. Russia on the other.  As a former Soviet republic there are still strong ties to Russia but many feel they are being sold out by their leaders to the Russians.  Some also feel the West is just interested in the gas and oil that is flowing through their country from Russia....they feel they are being played by both sides...hmmm seems like the cold war again...what do you think?

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US shale oil threatens to derail OPEC's future

US shale oil threatens to derail OPEC's future | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The rise of North American oil supplies could test the future of OPEC which may have to curb supply to accommodate rising shale oil volumes, a new report has found.
Al Picozzi's insight:

The rise of the US in producing oil, especailly shale oil,  coupled with the difficulties of OPEC countries in actually producing the oil my lead to lower demand for foregin oil in the US.  From someone who remembers the gas lines of the 70s this is a great development.  It also can mean new jobs in a new industry.  Question is how long can this resource last, and what are the evironmental impacts of this new technology? 

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