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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The devestation is just incredible and almost unbelievable.  It really shows just how we are at the mercy of nature no matter how we try to change our environment.  The technology is also incredible.  Not 10 years ago what we see now instantly would have taken alot longer.  This can also help the international rescue effort in going to where they are needed the most.  Having this information is priceless.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 2014 10:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see the amouth of detail they were able to map in a time of no computers and low technology.  Very useful for the Union field commanders at the time.  It enable them to determine what they might face as they marched through the Southern US.  The map also shows that though slavery was in the south in wasn't as heavy in some areas as compared to others. 

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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Love these maps.  Bubbler is so right in RI and I never knew it was called that anywhere else.  However I think they got the one about the subs wrong.  I still call those sandwhiches a grinder.  I went to Texas once and ask for a grinder and I still think the guy there is laughing at me to this day.  Its really is great to see the difference though even though this is one country with many different backgrounds.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders. 

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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  Looks like my state will be underwater.  An amazng graphic that really puts into perspective the reality of rising ocean levels. 

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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Population Density

Population Density | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing and easy to use map that shows were poeple mainly live.  It shows plainly where people settle and the patterns that develop, costs are still heavily populated as are area around major rivers.  Great resouoce to use with other maps to help maybe answer some of the questions about populations and exhaustion of resources.

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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Shark Tracker

Shark Tracker | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2013 10:02 PM

This is a project sponsored by OCEARCH (Ocean Reseach) that helps to track the journeys of individual sharks to better understand their migratory patterns.  This data also helps to establish maps of the spatial extend of Shark habitat.  This is in essence another fantastic practical application of GPS technology.


Tags: biogeographymapping, GPS.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 16, 2013 11:51 PM
its just never safe to get back intot he water is it. guess Im just showing my age with that movie reference. Saw Jaws at the Route 44 Drive in the Rustic full the the metal speaker that hung on your window...so much fun