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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see the amouth of detail they were able to map in a time of no computers and low technology.  Very useful for the Union field commanders at the time.  It enable them to determine what they might face as they marched through the Southern US.  The map also shows that though slavery was in the south in wasn't as heavy in some areas as compared to others. 

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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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British have invaded nine out of ten countries - so look out Luxembourg

British have invaded nine out of ten countries - so look out Luxembourg | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks like the British wanted to make everyone mad.  Remember the old say "the sun never set on the British Empire."  Now you can see how that can be true.

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Mapping America: Every City, Every Block

Mapping America: Every City, Every Block | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American
Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great way to see the breakdown of deographics in your city and even neighboorhood levels.  Has four categories to choose from, Race and Ethnicity, Income, Housing and Families and Education.  Each of these categories has a number of different maps to view.  Great interactive maps to use and lots of info.

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

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chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 4:43 PM
Very clarifying information.......narrator really speaks quickly, like he just drank 5 pots of coffee and has to catch a plane or something...The You Tube Video 'Coffee The Greatest Addiction Ever' pops up next to his video
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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NATO Members and Partner Countries

Al Picozzi's insight:

Take a look at this map.  NATO has expanded much since its founding in 1949.  Manily only the areas in grey do not have a relation with NATO in any way.  The Partners mainly are the old Soviet Republics.  Still many former Warsaw Pact nations are now in NATO.  NATO is still open for more nations to join.  Do you think the other couontries of the world feel left out and that they should join?

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36 Maps That Explain The Entire World

36 Maps That Explain The Entire World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Picture: Contrarian Edge
There may be no better way of explaining the world than through maps.Whether they depict oil flows, internet cables, or migra...
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great maps that show alot about the world.  Found the one imaged above to be great, entertaining and for some states including my own, Rhode Island, to be right.  Wonder if this is how we all think of each state.  Gets you thinking, doesn't it. Got a good smile from this one.

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Catholic Church Has Shifted Southward

Catholic Church Has Shifted Southward | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In 1900, two-thirds of the world’s Catholics lived in Europe. Today only 20 percent do.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:02 PM

As Europe has become an increasingly secularized set of societies, the demographic based of the Catholic Church has shifted south.  However, the power structure has not migrated south as the European cardinals still are a majority (although 2/3 vote necessary to elect the next pope). 


Tags: Christianity, culture, diffusionreligion.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 7:26 PM
With the shift south I think that was one of the main reasons the Pope was chosen from a South American country. It really is the only place the Catholic religion is growing
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 3:34 PM

Religion