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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:20 PM

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense. 

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Regional Geography
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Lax U.S. gun laws enable killing in Mexico

Lax U.S. gun laws enable killing in Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
U.S. needs to help end the violence....

 

When I say "illegal goods trafficked across the U.S.-Mexico border," most of us immediately think about narcotics from Mexico coming into the United States.  However, the border is more complicated than that--the violence on the border isn't only a problem with Mexican governance, but many of the deaths are directly attributable to guns coming form the United States.  This is an op-ed piece arguing the the United States' gun laws are a part of the ongoing problems along the border.   


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Illegal trade runs in both direction, drugs from Mexico north and guns and ammo south from the US.  Some of the trade was a badly handled "sting operation" to trace where the gun eventually went, but the government lost track of where they went and were not able to find the bigger bosses in the cartels.  Compared to gun laws in Mexico, yes ours are lax, however I think to state them as lax or weak in general might be an overstatement.  Some countries are even more strict, like Great Britian and there are some areas of the world where a child can buy an AK-47 off the street in broad daylight.  It is all taken in contex. 

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