Als Return to Edu...
Follow
Find tag "geospatial"
288 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I love the iconic opening of this video clip with the Indiana Jones movie clip which I actually saw at a drive in, yes I'm that old.  Great how we can use technology to find these area that might have gone undiscovered.  As a history guy the implications of using this technology in finding out about the pass is exciting with limitless possibilities.

more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.

Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Astrobleme

Astrobleme | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Lake Manicouagan lies in an astrobleme in central Quebec covering an area of approximately 1206 square miles—an area half the size of Delaware. An astrobleme is a scar left on the Earth’s surface from an impact of a meteorite. Lake Manicouagan is the result of one of the largest identified asteroid or comet impacts on Earth. In the middle of the lake, on Rene-Levasseur Island, Mount Babel rises 3,123 feet into the air.

 

Lake Manicouagan is thought to have formed about 212 million years ago plus or minus 4 million years.  This happened when an approximately 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid crashed into Earth toward the end of the Triassic period. Some scientists speculate that this impact may have been responsible for the mass extinction that wiped out more than half of all living species."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This amazing picture shows how vulnerable the earth is to space born hazards.  This 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid might have caused 1/2 the living species on the earth at that time, 212 million years or so ago, to become extinct.  Man has the abilty to adapt to changes to the environment, unlike the dinosaurs.  The question is though do we have the ability to adapt to an event of this magnitude?  Hopefully we will not have to test out this question.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.