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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that mother nature can and will destroy just about anything that we can build.  We know where there are flood plains and we know that flooding will occur.  What we might not know, fail to see, or just completely ignore, is how devestating these floods can become.  It seems to be a cost benefit analysis.  Cheaper to build and rebuild rather than building somewhere else maybe??  Does it seem to make sense?  Why are they still ancient Roman works still standing, and in use today?  Did they just build it better or did they just build in the right location??

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Mount Dixon Explodes!

Mount Dixon Explodes! | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
An initial analysis of the Mount Dixon landslide in New Zealand on Monday

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just an incredible sight to see.  The helicopter video is truly an amazing must see for anyone.  Just to imagine what it would be like to be there when it happened.  The speed at whcih the landslide moved plus the sounds it must have made would have been a once and a lifetime even, but if you were that close when it happened, it might be the end of your lifetime...what a way to go!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 24, 2013 10:52 PM

There are some great images (and a post-landslide helicopter flight video) of the massive landslide that occurred Jan 21, 2013.  The rockslide extends over 3 km, with an elevation change of approximately 800 meters.  This is an excellent example to help students visualize mass wasting, alpine glaciation and erosion in general.  While the mountain didn't explode strictly speaking, I couldn't help but love the headline "Mount Dixon explodes!"    


Tags: New Zealand, physical, geomorphology, erosion.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:49 AM

Mount Dixon's landslide is due to the mountain itself being unstable. The landslide pattern is normal in retrospect to other landslides that have happened over the years. The before and after pictures are a clear depiction of the landslide path from top to bottom.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:13 PM

There was a large landslide on Mount Dixon in New Zealand and this article not only explains what may have happened, there is also a video that you can watch to try and understand it better. This landslide had a large fall height and a long distance that it fell out from. The landslide fell on the west side of the mountain and removed a big section from the top. These photographs are miraculous to see and give you a better perspective of the fall and the direction of the landslide. The impact removed all of the snow and ice that was on the surface and the slide appeared to have ran energy by where it stopped. 

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Block Island Southeast Lighthouse - Block Island, Rhode Island

Block Island Southeast Lighthouse - Block Island, Rhode Island | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Block Island Southeast Lighthouse in Block Island, Rhode Island - History, Description, Pictures, Photographs, Location, Maps and GPS coordinates of the Block Island Southeast Lighthouse.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A beautiful place to visit.  They had to move it inland 300 feet in 1993 as more of the cliff was eroded away.  Cliff erosion has been an issue at Block Island for years, but they were able to save the lighthouse.  Well worth the money to preserve such a resource.  As the erosion continues I wonder when the next move will have to be? Only time will tell.

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