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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Hiding their idenity to get a job or to even live.  Much like many Jewish people did to survive in Hitler's Germany.  They pretened to be Catholic, Protestant anything but Jewish.  They did what they had to do to survive. The same is gong on in India, not on the scale of genocide, concentration camps, forced labor, etc., but it still is a form of opperession of a minority group in the largest "democracy" in the world.  It dates back to the partitiion of India after British rule.  Many Muslims were forced to migrated to what was then either West or East Pakistan, which is now Bangledesh.  Not all left.  There are about 127,000,000 Muslims in Indian manking it the second largest population of Muslims behind Indonesia, that is a sizeable minority even in a country of over 1 billion.  The nation overall would benefit from equality in the job maket in that there probably many skilled workers in a basically untouched labor pool.  The US has regulations against hiring practices based on one's religious belief, as well as age, gender, race etc., it is something that India might take an example from.  I know the US isn't perfect on its labor relations in the past, but we have been doing a good job as of late...though there are still lingering issues that will be solved giving time.  I tink its time for India to start becasue it will take a long time for things to change when they at least started.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:39 PM

Having to masquerade as a different religion in order to get a job is not a concept that most Americans are familiar with, as we live in a highly secular society.  India, which too is supposed to be a secular society, is failing at this as the article shows.  Muslim women have to pretend to be Hindus in order to get a job, as many Hindus (who are dominant in India) will refuse to higher people who follow Islam.  There are historical reasons for this, as the Hindus of the country were dominated by the Muslims for years under the Mughal Empire.  However, it is a sad fact that the secular country of India which is striving towards becoming a superpower would treat citizens of a different faith in such a poor manner.  This is very interesting for Americans to think about, and it even parallels our history.  In the 19th Century and even the earlier 20th century we were much more aware of religions and ethnicity and these groups stuck together, however by the time of the 1960s and 70s this landscape was rapidly disappearing.  India should itself move on from this practice, yet I believe it will be difficult given the nature of the situation, and the baggage carried by the groups.

 

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Egypt: Military may turn to Russia for aid and alliance | North Africa

Egypt: Military may turn to Russia for aid and alliance | North Africa | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Egypt has threatened to go it alone on foreign policy issues effectively disregarding its tradition allies - the United States or Israel – after Washington cut military aid.

Via Meagan Harpin
Al Picozzi's insight:

There is a fine line here that the US needs to be carefu on.  Geographically Egypt is extemely important to the US given that it controls the Suez Canal.  It is also an important ally in the fight against terrorism and has the only Arab peace treaty with Israel.  The cut of military aid could all end this.  In driving Egypt to seek aid from the Russians they is no need to keep that peace treaty with Israel, even though I do not think they wil end it, but there is always the possibility.  This is also important geopolitically, with the Chinese making inroads into this area, see http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/10/24/us-turkey-china-defence-usa-idUSBRE99N09X20131024 and Russia making its move in this area the US may be n the process of losing influence in this area of the world, something I do not think the US afford.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:40 PM

After Washington cut military aid Egypt has begun threating to go alone on foreign policy. Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said that Egypt should turn to Russia for military aid to manage its civil war with terrorism. 

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:40 PM

There always seemed to be a tension between the United States and Russia and its former Soviet partnerships.  The military hostility and even threats within the last few years show that relations among the world's superpowers and countries in the Middle East are always up for debate and controversy.  It's no wonder that Egypt threatening to turn to Russia for aid has rasised eyebrows among the international relations and trading traditions.  Though the U.S. can have a tough time assuring the relations among many of the Middle Eastern countries, they are necessary to be fulfilled given the rough history of all participating countries.

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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great site to see how globaliztions takes a hold.  Many of the airport on the list of in the US and many are in China.  Not surprising that the two leading economic powers in the world have the busiest airports.  Also it is interening to see Las Vegas on the list.  Seems that people need a place to blow off some steam from working so hard.

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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The Growing Significance of the Ocean for China's Opening up - People's Daily Online

The Growing Significance of the Ocean for China's Opening up - People's Daily Online | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As a nation on its shift from an opening large country to a fully opening strong country,the ocean
Al Picozzi's insight:

A good article to read from China.  It shows how they see that their economic geography is connected to the ocean and their costal ports and cities.  To me this is a return to the past as this area, and China, controlled world trade in the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.  Is there going to be anther shift in control of trade back to the west?  If so, will it take 400 years?

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:05 PM

While this might simply seem like a group of ports the more important message conveyed is that in fact that the majority of them are located in East Asia. Gone are the days of the industrial centers of the earth being located in Europe and the Americas. Paired with cheap labor and ease of global transportation many of these East Asian countries are quickly over coming many of the earths previous economic giants. 

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

We never heard about this during the Soviet Union as the news was controlled.  Also during the Soviet time I do not believe environmentalists would have gotton the chance to investigate the area.  With the fall of the USSR the world can now see some of the environmental effects that communism had on Russia.  These towns are built around the factory.  Much like the old steele towns in PA, like Allentown.  However Allentown chnaged with the times and is able to support, although it is difficult, the population that was focused on the steele industry.  Here is this remote area of Russia, there is nothing else in the area.  There is no service economy in the area, just the paper factory.  It has been kept open because of Putin who basically said to ignore all environmental laws and regulations and he made sure the environmental groups are not an issue anymore.  Not surprising from a former KGB Lt. Colonel and the Director of the FSB, the sucessor of the KGB.  To solve the issue in these monotowns I think there needs to be government intervention to transition the economies in theses areas.  To keep these factories running in the long run will just hurt all the people in the towns with no end in sight.  However, I do not think this will happen unless there is a change in the leadership of Russia, something I do not think will happen anytime soon.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 2:43 PM

The story of this particular mono-town is very tough to "pick sides".  The factory undoubtedly pollutes the air and land like most other industrial areas, but being so close to Lake Baikal gives environmentalists a stronger reason to complain.  The lake is considered one of the purest and most unique in the world, yet the paper mill located on its banks raise controversy.  This is where the locals and workers are stuck between a rock and hard place.  Located in Siberia, such a vast and open region with little settlements compared to the western part of the country reminds the people living there that their resources are limited.  Closing down the factory would almost eliminate income and economy for the mono-town.  This is where the fine line is drawn; the workers surely aren't happy about the pollution and environmental hazards that go along with keeping the mill open, but at the same time the people could wither away if it wasn't up and running.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 1:42 AM

THough the Soviet Union has been gone since the early 90s, it's hold on Russia is still creating problems. The creations of monotowns were already flawed. But to have this one monotown on Lake Baikal has gained the attention of enviromentalists. All odds are against that monotown. Without it's paper factory they have no jobs and no need for the town. It is a fight between enviromental geography and human geography in this area of the world. These people are stuck in a time where even the Soviet Union looked a little better than the constant wondering of your finacial stability in an up and coming capitalist nation.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 12:05 PM

The Soviet Union scattered "monotowns" around their territory; these monotowns consist of a job-creating industrial institutions like factories which then allow the formation of towns around them.  They are located all around the former Soviet Union and are very isolated.  After the collapse of the Soviet Union, these towns continued to run due to the privatization of the industrial center.  Today, Russia's Lake Baikal, which is the deepest lake in the world and contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, is home to one of these monotowns.  This particular town's economy is based on their paper mill which uses and deposits tons of chemicals.  Environmentalists are very concerned for the future of the lake while the citizens are only concerned with feeding their families and this is creating social unrest.  Due to the isolation and distance from Moscow, people cannot just pick up and leave.  Also, working with "cleaner" alternatives is way out of this town's budget.  Today, many citizens in these monotowns miss the support that the Soviet Union offered and people are literally stuck in a place where their only income is dirty.

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Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Mekong River was once a wild and primitive backwater. Today, growing demands for electricity and rapid economic growth are changing the character of what is the world's 12th-longest river.

 

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiences some impacts of globalization with residents having mixed feelings about the prospects. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

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Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:04 PM

There must be a better way to transport items and in return save the Mekong river from being degredated. Technological innovations are affecting the life in the river as local fishermen are seeing less and less fish traveling in the river. This is impacting them in the sense that they use these fish for their survival as well as for selling. They fear that in building dams and creating advanced roads over the Mekong will change their enviroment altogether and will hinder their livelihood. This is a beautiful river and I personally feel there could be a better way but there is always something sacrficed when the government choses a location to build on. - M. Carvajal

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 8:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:21 PM

The Mekong river is a river that many fisherman in Laos depend on for food and income. Plans to build dams that will cause the fish to seek an alternate route to migrate upstream. Critics of the dams say that the dams will cause the fish to abandon the Mekong river and go through their neighboring rivers, leaving the residents without a source of income. Many in favor of the dams say the reverse, that building the dams will boost economy and cause the area to flourish.

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A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:20 PM

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense. 

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Brazilian Ethanol

Brazilian Ethanol | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Distilling ethanol from tropical sugarcane takes less land and uses less fossil fuel than starting with corn grown in temperate climes. That makes Brazilian ethanol, unlike the pampered and grotesquely wasteful American version, competitive with hydrocarbons and genuinely good for the environment." 

 

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  For a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol, see: http://cei.org/studies-issue-analysis/brazilian-sugarcane-ethanol-experience  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great idea here.  i know that using corn is much more expensive than sugar, nut imagine the tade we can get with Brazil if we imprt more sugan ans then use it for gas.  It will probably still be cheaper than the regular gas, and the corn ethanol.  In the long run if this is used, along with the shale oil depositis the US has, we can reduce our dependance on oil from areas like the middle east and other countries which in turn can create many jobs here in the US.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:52 PM

Even though other countries have yet to catch on, the ethanol trend is a clever way to get ahead.  Their new strategy is a model for economic and environmental stability. Eventually, resources such as oil will run out as they are finite and in the long term, Brazil will have the upper hand. When the day comes that oil is extremely scarce, Brazil ill be hundreds of years ahead of the game.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:25 AM

Brazil is taking advantage of its natural resources to make themselves competitive in the global market. Today geography can change the shape of the economics around the globe. The prospect of economic growth and energy competitiveness has made them short sighted.  Brazil has to beware of becoming a mono-commodity country that relies on a business that is not sustainable.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:35 PM

While only Brazil is taking part in this and it hasn't completely replaced gasoline it is without a doubt a step in the right direction that hopefully other nations can learn from. While the hypotheses over how much oil fluctuates it is undeniable it isn't a permanent solution, the future of fuel must lie in renewal resources. Unfortunately oil companies hold so much sway in politics its unknown how much change is actually possible today. Regardless of this hopefully one day the world as a whole will realize this and seek to emulate Brazil's in innovation.

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Geography of a Recession

Geography of a Recession | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Here is an animated view of the impact of the recession on the United States.  It's a fantastic geovisualization of a horrible economic reality. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It makes you wonder about the recovery the government is also talking about.  Alot of the new jobs created are temporary, part-time and low wages.  What they also do not tell you is that the unemployment is going down because the government does count the people that are unemployed but have stopped looking from work.  Alot of these people are just tired of looking and have given up.  So if your not looking for work, but are unemployed, you are not counted as unemployed for the purpose of the unemployment number, interesting isnt't it??  What the map shows is that the upper mid-west and the central mid-west seem to be recession proof.   Is that because alot of this area are family farms or is it because these areas are low population and there is a shortage of people to work the available job?  Or are these states just better at running their government?

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Brandon Murphy's comment, August 7, 2012 11:48 PM
It's quite interesting to see the areas of which the local economies are supposedly starting to turn around and what the numbers actually show.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:45 PM

This interactive map offers a lot to read between the lines. Most interesting to me, the middle of the country seemed to be somewhat spared in comparison to the East and West coasts. Perhaps that is becuase the middle of the country has lower population than the coast and that the majority of the jobs held by people there are related to food production. The bread basket of America will never be relieved of demand for goods and that also means workers. Also super interesting- Washigton DC and the surrounding area reflected a somewhat better unemployment rate. Same with Vermont and New Hampshire- perhaps the population is more even with the labor demand than in extremely populated places that only have so many jobs.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:35 PM

(North America topic 10)
After viewing this animated map of unemployment rates over time, I'm surprised that it hasn't become more common. In fact, I don't think I've seen anything like this on any major news reports or websites. (I wonder why?) I was surprised to find out that many (though not all) Midwestern counties appear to have been just as adversely affected as more urbanized, coastal regions; although the Midwest's unemployment rate has overall been less than other regions', recently it has been so only by a narrowing margin.
I would make 2 suggestions if this map were to be remade or enhanced: First, I would add more recent data to show which regions are recovering (if at all) compared to others. Secondly, I would make additional brackets to represent rates in excess of 10%, since a large portion of counties have fallen into this top color level.

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is change is the immigration from Mexico will also change the deographics of the area into which they are moving.  Higher incomes, more businesses, more employment in that area that will hopefully spread to other areas.  This is an unforseen result of the drug wars and although it is a positive result, the violence will need to stop.  As it improves the economic situation in the US it worses in the area of Mexico where these type of people are needed.  Legitimate businesses are leaving Mexico leaving a vacume that is going to be filled by the cartels, which will make the problems grow.  While this is a postive for the US in the areas where they are moving to, it is also a negative for Mexico and in the long run a negative for the US.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?

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China bypasses American ‘New Silk Road’ with two of its own

China bypasses American ‘New Silk Road’ with two of its own | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
China aims to secure energy supplies with large Central and Southeast Asian investments.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems the Silk Road is making a comeback ni Central Asia.  China wants to make sure it has access to new gas and oil of the new Central Asian republics like Kazakhstan.  Once used as the major overland trade route to the west, the silk road is being reborn.  So is sea trade through the Strait of Malacca, whcih was huge in the 14th, 15th,16th and 17th centuries.  China is using its money and influence in the area to reopen these "silk roads."  Even Chinese President Xi Jinping talked about the travels of the Han dynasty envoy Zhang Qian to this area.  It seems that history does repeat itself.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:31 PM

Chinas president is trying to build a new silk road. This would secure Chinas energy supplies, boost trade and transport links and strengthen regional policy coordination from the Pacific to the Baltic Sea. 

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Putin calls for 'Eurasian Union'

Putin calls for 'Eurasian Union' | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Russian PM Vladimir Putin calls for the formation of a "Eurasian Union" of former Soviet republics, but says it will not be like the defunct USSR.

 

Russia's cultural influence over former Soviet Republics is strong, but the desire to strengthen these old ties is deeply embedded into the cultural ethos of Russia.  It is also a key part of Russia's geopolitical strategy for greater international influence and economic strength.

 


Via Seth Dixon, Meagan Harpin
Al Picozzi's insight:

So is this just to compete with NAFTA and the EU on an economic level?  Or is this to compete with the EU on economic, political and military level, much like the EU's EuroCorps?  Putin states thie is not a return to the USSR, but Russia has always been weary with the growing of NATO and the EU on its borders.  How about if Turkey gets int the EU right on the Russian border?  This action might move thie bloc creation even more forward and Putin might become more forceful to its creation.  No that former KGB member Putin is foreful.

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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:20 AM
Russia's will to start a Eurasian Union seems to be a ploy to recreate a neo-Soviet administration obviously dominated by Russia. Millions of Russians live in these satellite nations so it will be more than easy for Russia to spread its influence and dominate this union. It would also be a bad decision for some of these nations to join in a union with Russia. Some nations, such as Azerbaijan, are rich in oil reserves, and a union with Russia could be detrimental to their development.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:59 PM

Putin is calling for a Eurasian Union. He said it would change the political and economical configuration of the continent and have positve global effects. Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan have already formed an ecomonical allicance and it removes customs barriers. Putin has however denied that he is propsing for the recreation of the Soviet Union.  

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:26 PM

It is more than understandable that former Soviet satelite states are weary of any kind of union with Russia. However, some sort of treaty could benefit the block, particularly an arangement like the one already held between Russia, Belarus, and Kahzakstan. An agreement that would ease travel between the two countries appears to have little downside.

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A Rhode Island School for Wayward Boys Is Itself Reformed

A Rhode Island School for Wayward Boys Is Itself Reformed | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The remains of the Sockanosset Training School for Boys in Cranston, R.I., are now the base of a development with retail, residential and commercial space.
Al Picozzi's insight:

An article from back in 2009.  Showing how Cranston was revitalizing the Sockanosset area.  These buildings were "the bad boys school" as I was told when I was growing up.  You can see the original chapel that was kept in the picture above.  The area in now complete and called Chapel Hill.  The dorms were incorporated into the new buildings to keep some of the old architecture.  There is no real downtown in Cranston.  Everytime someone says downtown one thinks of Providence.  Is this an attempt to make a downtown area in Cranston?  I do not htink so, it is an extension of the olf Garden City Shopping Center, that downtown feeling is missing to me.  However it was an attempt to revitalize the area after a number of businesses closed in Garden City.  Did it work?  Seems to be working as the area has attracted new businesses and resturants and construction is still going on!

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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

One thing I bet most people did not know is that we get most of our foregin oil from Canada ans not an OPEC country at all.  This source really can help the US, but it does have drawbacks.  Expensive to refine, dangerous to ship in the proposed pipeline as it can corrode the pide easily.  Again seems a cost benefit analysis needs to be done, especailly with the US have large oil reserves in shale oil.  Is that source of oil cheaper to produce thereby growing domestic oil production??  Or is it cheaper to import the oil because of other considerations, like labor and environmental regulations?

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Neal G. Lineback's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:51 AM

This is a Geography in the News dealing with the background of the Keystone pipeline proposal and Canadian tar sands.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

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Eurozone unemployment hits record high

Eurozone unemployment hits record high | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The 17-nation bloc had a jobless rate of 11.6 per cent in September, while inflation eased slightly in the last month.

 

Although some countries in the Eurozone have lower unemployment rates like Austria (4.4%) and Germany (5.4%), more are in the worst collective tailspin since the creation of the common currency.  Spain has the worst unemplyment rate at 25.8% of the adult population out of work.  It has taken a nasty cultural and political turn as resentments and frustrations are boiling over in the Eurozone.  Some are derisively referring to the struggling southern European countries as P.I.G.S. (Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain). 

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

A big problem in the EU.  There are countries feeling the pinch becasue of the problems of other countries.  They feel why do we have to foot the bill of so many other countries that are just failing in their own economies through their own fault.  Sounds about the same as in the US when people say why do I have to pay for others mistakes and pay more in taxes.  One is on a macro scale, one is on a micro scale. 

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 7:48 PM

This article was interesting because unemployment is such a big topic discussed with many people today. Unemployment in the Eurozone has reached an all time high in September as their economy is falling into a recession. The highest rate was recorded in Spain where 25.8 adults are unemployed. Further layoffs are going to occur as their budget programs begin to kick in. Austria, the Netherlands, and Germany have the lowest recorded rates.

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 8:22 PM

I'm a bit confused at this article. Are the people who lost their birthdays a cause of a new border creation or a time zone?

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:18 PM

Makes you think about the political and economic influences on just about anything. What time or day it is is an important element to a global economy. Know when business deals can be made in an instance knowing what standards are most efficient can alter systems of dating. That is why instead of having a straight line the line is jutting out in spots. Usually we think of our time zones being dependent on where the sun in relation to our location but in this instance we see that it is merely a man made line that can be altered. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, Today, 1:06 PM

This is to me the coolest geographic location in the World... A group of islands nation located in both the south and north hemispheres and also to both the east and west of the international time line zone.

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

With the growing number of people in general and the economy growing giving access to more "stuff" the governement seems to have fallen behind in providing the infrastructure to support this type of growth.  Yes it is easier to get a phone then to get plumbing..why?  It is not like the US where most cities have the basic infrastructure set up...there is a main sewer line.  It might be expnsive to hook up to, but it is relatively simple and inexpensive when compare to not have a main line to begin with.  That requires a major industrial effort, city planning, major disruption to the daily life.  In the US, adding a main sewer line is a big job, but its one which can be done easily when compared to other countries.  India is an economic boom, alot of activity, but they also need to step up to get the basic infrastructure down so all the people can take advantage of this new wealth.  It is the largest democracy in the world, but it lacks the industrial muscle to take on large civic projects that are necessary to keep up with the growth.

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:10 AM

Government in India may be ill equipped to handle the need for sewage, sanitation and clean water. These items are harder to come by than cell phones and televisions. Over 1/2 of the country lacks basic sanitation, but yet, have cell phones. This dystopia is leading to even people climbing out of poverty from having some of the basics needed for a healthy life.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 29, 2014 3:41 PM

Its interesting in a country as large as India, its number one problem is waste management. Its telling of the priorities of the country's leader and it also speaks on the country's reception of first world waste. While more than half of Indians have access to a cell phone device, television and other electronic products, its also embarrassing on the country's behalf that less than half of the country's population have access to toilets.

I believe the case for this is Indian government not have the proper equipment to be able to establish properly install proper sanitation in the land. In order for the government to put in place they would need to establish a proper pipelines throughout the land to ensure that once toilets are set in place, waste is properly disposed of.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.

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Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash

Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Abshir Boyah, a pirate who says he has hijacked more than 25 ships off the coast of Somalia, says he will give up this career if certain terms are met.

 

What economic, cultural and political circumstances in the 21st century would allow for piracy to exist?  What are the impacts of piracy on Somalia?  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Much like the piracy in the Caribbean in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries it is done in order to gain wealth and by the looks of it, fame.  They are called Pirate Kings in the video by the New York Times.  Again much like the pirate kings of the Caribbean.  Here however they are willing to give it up in order to better their country with the help of the internation community, the pirates of the Caribbean didn't have a country and they liked it that way.  However, it was tried in the early 1990's to help allievate the food and humanitarian suffering.  However the warlords of the time, especailly Aideed, saw their power, as well as their money, disappearing, so they fought this relief effort and kept Somalia in the dangerous situation it is in today.  So you have to ask the question: Can you take the pirates seriously that they want to change??  Past history says no.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:25 PM

Somalia's pirates are notorious worldwide, and while the pirates may be committing horrible crimes, it is important to understand why these people have turned to illegal means to survive. The economic state of Somalia is rather grim. Considered a textbook "failed state", men for the most part have to choose between working as a fishermen or turning to piracy. Since fishermen barely scrape a living from the waters, Somalian men turn to piracy. With no other economic opportunities, it is often seen as the only choice. Many Somali pirates openly admit that if they had other options, they would absolutely change occupations. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:17 PM

The media oftentimes demonizes specific groups of people. So I was presently surpassed that the NYT’s investigated the human aspect of desperation. Many of these Somalians are hopeless and the economic burden on their shoulders drives them to act unethical. When you first priority is survival, courteousness and moral laws often don’t apply. Nevertheless, it was cool to hear about these human stories.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 31, 7:37 PM

Just like the pirates of the late 17th and early 18th centuries, these folks bring all the vices of the originals except perhaps without much of the romanticism that comes with the elders. Though perhaps in two hundred years someone will make a movie titled Pirates of the Somalia featuring Johnny Depp's great-great-great grandson. 

 

It's understandable why these people want to get out of the business. Despite the sex and wealth they've gotten, it's not exactly stable employment. Nor is it as safe as sitting at a desk or being a plumber. But when your society simply doesn't support these industries, then the people are left to resort to more drastic measures.

 

It's also interesting to see the quazi-government stepping in to try and combat it. Traditional Muslim values are the reason for them wanting and end to it. It's understandable to not want children to look up to pirates and the life of crime they lead. But in order for the practice to stop, the pirates want international environmental protections, aid, and government support. Should the international community give into piracy or should it be removed by force?

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U.S. Travel To Cuba Grows As Restrictions Are Eased

The Obama administration has relaxed travel restrictions to Cuba, reinstating Bill Clinton's policy of allowing people-to-people travel.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

With this news you can seen how the times are changing.  Compare this to my scoop on the Cuban Missle Crisis of 1962  i believe we need to normalize our relations with Cuba.  They really are not a threat to our national security, I can't see them alinging with countries like North Korea or terrorists like Al-Qaeda.  This area of the world as a whole needs to be somewhat like the Canadian border, not not completely open.  Can you imagine if a country like Cuba in NAFTA??  Why not? Great market for goods and services. Also the historian in me would love to see Cuba.  Lots of History there just to be seen..who knows maybe there will be an opening soon.

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 20, 2014 10:36 PM

I always knew it was not safe for Americans to travel to Cuba,however I was under the impression that it was Cuba that would not let Americans travel there. I did not know that the U.S. government actually forbade it. It must be interesting to see what this country is like since it has not been a place we were able to go for so long.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:54 AM

I agree with this move. The embargo on Cuba was imposed during the Cold War. Cuba provided Russia with an ally less than a hundred miles from the coast of Florida so it made sense to want to cut off contact and goods to the government of Cuba. Now however the threat is non existent. Furthermore, allowing American tourist easier access to Cuba will open up pathways for people who may have family in Cuba to go see them. Miami has a gigantic Cuban population, its nice to know it will be easier for them to go an visit if they wish do to so.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 7:40 PM

The growth between the U.S and Cuba has increased business wise from their past. Allowing tourists travel to Cuba is a slow process of Growth leading to more of an expansion in whatever business whether it be oil or goods to trade its a slow process of trust that's appearing between the two.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  With no saftey regulations to go by, nor any labor unions to file greviences for bad working conditions, and unsafe for that matter, its no wonder they can be on budget and of course this will give them a competitive edge.  If they can do it cheaper it will cost less than anyone else can do it for, and everyone knows governments will always go the cheapest route.  The labor cost is so much lower in China, think no safety regulaitons or government watchdog like OSHA, that it is cheaper to make it there and ship it across the globe.  They really have no regard for worker safety in any industry, this video just shows that even in construction, or destruction, there is no concern for the workers...interesting coming from a Communist country where the worker was supposed to be the most important person, over the capitalists.  Hmmm makes you think....

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:52 PM

China's ability to sweep unjust working conditions under the rug has allowed it to grow economically at an impressive rate. Although I disagree with unsafe working conditions it is important to note the hypocrisy that developed countries display when advocating fro workers rights. In the US for example, our economic growth was contingent on slavery, child labor, and immigrant exploitation. Unfortunately if any developing country wants to compete with countries that are at the top of the global economic hegemony, they must cut the same corners those countries cut centuries ago. What needs to be done is find a way to show developing countries that growth is possible without abusing workers. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:23 PM

This video borders on difficult to watch. While it is definitely amazing to watch it really flies in the face of standard American job safety operations. These workers are perched on top of this building with no harnesses balancing in the shovel of a back hoe while sawing loose great slabs of concrete. Luckily no one was injured in this video but frankly this video does a great job of showing how China has been able to grow so rapidly. A lack of interest in individual workers safety and a sole goal of progress, at the possible cost of its citizens.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:45 PM

China has one of the strongest economies in the world. However, I think sometimes, China takes that for granted. They think that just because they have a strong economy, they don't have to worry about safe working environments and they have nothing to lose if something happens to someone. As much as I'm sure China gives good paychecks to manufactured workers because of its wealth, there are some jobs, such as this one, that they think they don't have to pay enough. However at the same time, it's not China's fault. Sometimes, it's the workers faults for not using common sense while working, I'm a firm believer in "work smarter, not harder."

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Another showing that the trend of illegal immigration is on the decline, even as Congress still is looking for ways to pass an immigration reform bill.  With the US economic problems, post 9/11 tightening of the US border and new labor laws whcih make it difficult to hire people who are considered illegal, plus other factors have led to less and less Mexicans coming to the US.  With NAFTA finally beginning to have a postivie effect in Mexico, more foregin companies are investing in Mexico with its low labor and low transportation costs to the US.  This leads to better and more jobs in Mexico and an economic boom, which it turn allows for better education for Mexican citizens at home.  People from the US are following some of these jobs and they are heading into Mexico as a change in pace from the other way around. 

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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 2014 9:31 PM

These statistics are drastically "left out" of the immigration conversation. There is little to no talk about the emigration in Mexico. Many people are wanting to stay where they are because conditions have improved.I believe if more people knew of this information than maybe we could look past this as such a hot button topic.