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Scottish independence: ‘Finance industry would leave’

Scottish independence: ‘Finance industry would leave’ | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
ThE financial services industry north of the Border would relocate to England if Scotland votes for independence next year, a senior Conservative has warned at the party conference.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Thie vote could be a major blow to the economy of Scotland.  If the finance industry does leave to England this could leave a new nation very vunerable economically.  Will they be admitted to the EU if there is no finacne industry in the country?  Will other countried recognize Scotland as an independant nation?  What of defense?  Most of the military belongs to Great Britian, will they all leave?  will they stay?  Will Scotland even be allowed to leave, vote of no vote?  Devolution forces are in Scotland, especially historical.  The people might vote for independence, but in this day and age, it is something that must not be taken lightly.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 12, 2013 9:45 PM

This could be a masive blow to Scotlands economy. A buisness minister has warned that the uncertanity of independance could cause companies like the royal bank of scotland to leave the third biggest center for financial services. 

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:54 AM
I found this article really interesting for a few different reasons. As a history major, the article provided a lot of information that I thought was interesting and of which I was unaware. It’s important to understand the reasons for the breakup and/or formation of countries when studying history. Part of understanding that is recognizing and analyzing the geographic implications of these changes.
Perhaps most importantly, the disappearance of countries would certainly have severe economic repercussions. The complete absence of an economy that had been around for decades, or the emergence of several new economies all at once would have serious effects on the interaction between neighboring countries and the global economy. Cultural unity and tension also plays a large role in the disappearance of countries. Examining patterns of cultural dissimilarity and hostility explains the breakup of these countries and makes for nations that possess a great deal of cultural homogeneity and a palette of cultural diversity in a small geographic area.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:17 PM

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:00 PM

Uighurs are being pushed out of their homeland because of Han Chinese migration. This article is accurate when it claims that the amount of publicity the region gets is minimum. This makes the Uighurs more at risk than Tibet. With so much attention put on areas elsewhere, China will face less international push back as it over takes yet another region who wishes to maintain its autonomy and culture.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:54 PM

I believe that without doubt today it is a bad time to be a minority in China. The Chinese are experiencing a great deal of nationalism and in turn placing economic barriers on the minorities in order to drive them out of regions so the government will be able to repopulate them with Han Chinese. While the Han Chinese have always been the majority within China its only recently the government has decided to provide them with advancement at the risk of the other ethnic groups within China. 

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The Geo-Politics of Military Bases, Empire and Independence

The Geo-Politics of Military Bases, Empire and Independence | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

The Ministry of Defence’s latest threat to keep Faslane as sovereign territory in the event of Scottish Independence should be seen in the context of Britain’s imperial history of maintaining military bases against the wishes of local people across the world.

 

Al Picozzi's insight:

Really interesting news in Geopolitics and devolution.  If Scotland does vote to split form the UK, and if the UK even aloows the vote to mean something, what will happen to all the militray stationed in Scotland?  How about all the UK businesses there?  What will an independant Scotland do? What currency wil they have, the Euro? Will they even get into the EU? Lots of questions to answer here and way to many to list.  Something to think about though isn't it?

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Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash

Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Abshir Boyah, a pirate who says he has hijacked more than 25 ships off the coast of Somalia, says he will give up this career if certain terms are met.

 

What economic, cultural and political circumstances in the 21st century would allow for piracy to exist?  What are the impacts of piracy on Somalia?  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Much like the piracy in the Caribbean in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries it is done in order to gain wealth and by the looks of it, fame.  They are called Pirate Kings in the video by the New York Times.  Again much like the pirate kings of the Caribbean.  Here however they are willing to give it up in order to better their country with the help of the internation community, the pirates of the Caribbean didn't have a country and they liked it that way.  However, it was tried in the early 1990's to help allievate the food and humanitarian suffering.  However the warlords of the time, especailly Aideed, saw their power, as well as their money, disappearing, so they fought this relief effort and kept Somalia in the dangerous situation it is in today.  So you have to ask the question: Can you take the pirates seriously that they want to change??  Past history says no.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:25 PM

Somalia's pirates are notorious worldwide, and while the pirates may be committing horrible crimes, it is important to understand why these people have turned to illegal means to survive. The economic state of Somalia is rather grim. Considered a textbook "failed state", men for the most part have to choose between working as a fishermen or turning to piracy. Since fishermen barely scrape a living from the waters, Somalian men turn to piracy. With no other economic opportunities, it is often seen as the only choice. Many Somali pirates openly admit that if they had other options, they would absolutely change occupations. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:17 PM

The media oftentimes demonizes specific groups of people. So I was presently surpassed that the NYT’s investigated the human aspect of desperation. Many of these Somalians are hopeless and the economic burden on their shoulders drives them to act unethical. When you first priority is survival, courteousness and moral laws often don’t apply. Nevertheless, it was cool to hear about these human stories.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:37 PM

Just like the pirates of the late 17th and early 18th centuries, these folks bring all the vices of the originals except perhaps without much of the romanticism that comes with the elders. Though perhaps in two hundred years someone will make a movie titled Pirates of the Somalia featuring Johnny Depp's great-great-great grandson. 

 

It's understandable why these people want to get out of the business. Despite the sex and wealth they've gotten, it's not exactly stable employment. Nor is it as safe as sitting at a desk or being a plumber. But when your society simply doesn't support these industries, then the people are left to resort to more drastic measures.

 

It's also interesting to see the quazi-government stepping in to try and combat it. Traditional Muslim values are the reason for them wanting and end to it. It's understandable to not want children to look up to pirates and the life of crime they lead. But in order for the practice to stop, the pirates want international environmental protections, aid, and government support. Should the international community give into piracy or should it be removed by force?