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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Mapping America: Every City, Every Block

Mapping America: Every City, Every Block | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American
Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Great way to see the breakdown of deographics in your city and even neighboorhood levels.  Has four categories to choose from, Race and Ethnicity, Income, Housing and Families and Education.  Each of these categories has a number of different maps to view.  Great interactive maps to use and lots of info.

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The Russian Cross

Natural Population Growth of Russia.PNG

English: Natural population growth trends of Russia. Data source: Demoscope death rates,Demoscope birth rates, Rosstat

The economic and social turmoil after the fall of the Soviet Union was profound enough to be seen in the demographic statistics.  Birth rates dropped as the death rates went up.  Typically when birth rates drop it is presented as an indicator of social development, but it clearly is not in this instance.  What explains these statistics?  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

An increase in deaths can be seen because of the dramatic change of governments that would have a profouond psychological effect on the people.  The stress that the people went through must have great after being under the Soviet system since 1917.  What does this mean for Russia?  This combined with peole leaving Russia for what they see as a better chance can have sever destablizing effects in the country.  Worker shortages are the 1st thing that comes to mind, maybe even a return to stop people from leaving. With the EU growing NATO expaning, what is Russia goning to do escpecailly with its long history of suspicion of the "West?"

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:52 PM

This graph shows that while we in the west think of the fall of communism as a freeing and positive event in reality many in Russia have been severely damaged by this. While the Soviet government was known for oppression it also provided security and was dependable. With its fall the people were plunged into confusion leading to a decline in birthrate and a raise in suicide and alcoholism.    

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 16, 2015 7:42 PM

This graph of Births, Death and Natural Growth shows that the Natural Growth along with the Births in Russia have declined since 1950, the main downfall is during the collapse of the U.S.S.R. While the Deaths in Russia are increasing gradually as the collapse of the U.S.S.R approacher. There are many factors that could be causing deaths in Russia, people are not getting enough food into their systems and sickness is easily attracted. The real for the downfall in births is because women and men are not mating and having a child because they are too busy working and building a life for themselves. Back in 1950-1952 families were consisting of 3-4 children and now families only have one child at maximum 2.  How can Russia increase these birth and natural growth rates? The social development of Russia must increase and people have to start living life differently.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:08 PM

When looking at this graph it is showing that something had to have happened to make death rates go up and the birth rates to go down. The life expectancy of men dropped, alcohol poisoning occurred more frequently, suicide occurred, and a declining population of 1 million or so people a year. All of these factors can create  higher death rate with older people staying in place and the younger generation moving out. With this happening the birth rate would drop and the death rate would increase.

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Cranston East hockey is no more; Bolt will merge with Cranston West

Cranston East hockey is no more; Bolt will merge with Cranston West | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Ice hockey at Cranston High School East, with its decades-long history of championships, All-State players and future pros and coaches, is history.Only seven players remain from the 2013 Thunderbolt roster,...
Al Picozzi's insight:

Interesting story about the changing demographics in Cranston, my hometown.  Here is a quote from the article: "Middle class neighborhoods that produced Caucasian hockey players for Cranston East in decades past now produce Asian and Hispanic volleyball and soccer players, which is great for those sports but bad for hockey."  Alot of those families have moved to the western side of Cranston, hence the merge with West, but that program is alos suffering.

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The Greek island of old age

The Greek island of old age | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The inhabitants of a small Greek island live on average 10 years longer than the rest of western Europe. So what's the secret to long life in Ikaria?

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I think sometimes it is best to look to the past so that we might have a better future.  A return to a simpler time, less stress, less to worry about.  Even in the technology age of iphones, and tablets and the aways staying connected we need to go back to where we are not connected.  I've seen to many people on "vacation" doing work whiel with their families..how is that healthy??  We need to slow down a bit, take it easy now and then and just unplug!

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:09 PM

According to this article, The people of the small Greek Island of Ikaria have a life expectancy that is 10 years longer than any other part of the world. It is attributed  to the nutritious diet that the citizens have and the lack of influence that the outside world has on other places. With less environmental factors to harm it, Ikaria is one of the most geographically advantageous places to live a healthy life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 11:07 AM

Scientists are always coming across new evidence proving that specific lifestyles, foods, and activities are what allow some to live longer than others, but maybe we need to look at life length at a geographic level. These places where people live longer, healthier lives must have some common threads linking them. It could be similar cultural constructs that are endemic to these places, promoting healthy habits, a sense of community, and overall peaceful lifestyles. 

 

Oddly enough, most of his daily routines, such as drinking tea, using local honey, drinking wine, and leading an active lifestyle, are touted by different scientists and salespeople as to keys to longevity. I think, that these routines combined with a great sense of community, lack of stress, and happiness lead to long life. The community on this island is very close knit, and many people live happily. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 2015 11:06 AM

I really believe that the clean air of this island could have something to do with the life expectancy being higher.  The less toxins you breathe in the less of a chance you will have to developing cancers and other diseases.  

 

Now as to how this gentleman defeated lung cancer after moving from the U.S. to Ikaria is a whole other story.  Maybe the wine did help.  Maybe leaving a dirty and toxin-ridden environment helped kill the cancer.  Bare minimum, this article definitely shines the light on the air-quality in certain parts of the world.

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Another showing that the trend of illegal immigration is on the decline, even as Congress still is looking for ways to pass an immigration reform bill.  With the US economic problems, post 9/11 tightening of the US border and new labor laws whcih make it difficult to hire people who are considered illegal, plus other factors have led to less and less Mexicans coming to the US.  With NAFTA finally beginning to have a postivie effect in Mexico, more foregin companies are investing in Mexico with its low labor and low transportation costs to the US.  This leads to better and more jobs in Mexico and an economic boom, which it turn allows for better education for Mexican citizens at home.  People from the US are following some of these jobs and they are heading into Mexico as a change in pace from the other way around. 

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".