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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon, Paige McClatchy
Al Picozzi's insight:

As a former British territory English is the main language for now.  Because of the country's success in harsh economic times immigration to this country is increasing, which is chaning the demographics.  Spanish is now growing in importance as immigrants from Gutaemala, Honduras and El Salvador enter Belize. These immigrants are supplying the cheap labor to work in the sugar and banana platations in the outlying areas, while others are working in the oil export industry and the growing tourism industry.  Much like the migrant workers that come to the US to work in agriculture, the immigrants to Belize are taking the low paying, but labor intensive, jobs that some people that do just not want to do.  One thing I found ironic, politicians "buying" votes to the new growing immigrant population...sound familiar??

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:18 PM

It's interesting to compare and contrast the reaction of Belize's English-speaking population to an influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants with that of the United States. I enjoyed reading that the welcoming of immigrants by the ruling political system has done much to lessen racial tensions, with the various ethnic groups scattered along the political spectrum. This contrasts sharping with the American political spectrum, where there is a clear racial divide between conservatives and liberals. Americans could learn a lot from Belize in this regard, although the transition has been far from smooth in the nation. Although Spanish is now taught in schools as a result of the reality of the immigration wave in the country, there is some push-back from English speaking groups. Many employees of service industries are losing their jobs to those who can offer bilingual services, as well as some other economic changes as a result of the influx of new immigrants. However, the degree of this tension is a lot lower there than it is in the United States. It will be interesting to see how this debate shapes up in the future; it could very well serve as a helpful model for American politicians.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:49 AM

You won't BELIZE this link.... get it.

I'm hilarious.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:48 PM

This country of Belize seems to be a very interesting place. I never knew that in Central America, there was a country who's official language is English. It is made up of a lot of retired British soldiers and North American "sun seekers." Migration into Belize comes from other place in Central America, of its 300,000 person population, 15% are foreign born. It is now becoming a very mixed country and Spanish is making a gain on English. Schools teach in English, but Spanish lessons are mandatory. A  population boom both helps and hurts the economy. Most migrants are of working age and are willing to work low wages in brutal conditions. A lot of Belizeans tell census that they are not working and with Spanish gaining ground, a lot of monopolistic people are losing jobs to those who are bilingual. Although there are frictions between ethnic groups, in general things are good and political party lines are not divided by ethnicity. 

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Kate Middleton gives birth to baby boy

Kate Middleton gives birth to baby boy | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to a son, who will be the Prince of Cambridge
Al Picozzi's insight:

So what is the big hype about the birth of a boy into the British Monarchy that wields no real political power?  Why do we as Americans care?  Tradition and culture.  To be British is to support the Monarchy.  It is part of British beliefs and way of life to support the Monarchy as the British people have done for hundreds of years.  It is ingrained.  Even though there is no real political power the people for the most part still support the Royal Family.  As for us Americans, it is also part of our culture.  We started off as colonies in the British Empire and were so since the founding of Jamestown in 1603 unit the end of the American Revolution in 1783.  We still are interested in what happens there as we had are beginnings in Great Britain.

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Moving A Rare Piece Of Military History - WKRG-TV

Moving A Rare Piece Of Military History - WKRG-TV | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Moving A Rare Piece Of Military History
WKRG-TV
Relocating the gun to Bicentennial Park is a small part of a long-term strategic plan to make North Baldwin County a regional, military history and tourism destination.
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is something that needs to needs to done country wide and where the US has memorials overseas.  We need to preserve oour history no matter where it is.  It is part of our culture, it is part of our history and they all need to be protected and preserved.

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A special Knightsville corner - The Feast of the Madonna Della Civita.

A special Knightsville corner  - The Feast of the Madonna Della Civita. | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

The feast in the Knightsville section of Cranston start Wednesday 7/17/13.  Always has been a part of my life and part of my culture that I am passing on to my children.  It is important to me for them to know where they came from, that traditions and culture are important.  Its a great time, that is run by St. Mary's Church in Cranston, to be with family, friends and to have some great food.  This feast is run at about the same time as the original feast in Itri, Italy where many of the locals in Cranston can trace their family heritage. See http://trecancelle.wordpress.com/2009/07/26/feast-of-la-madonna-della-civita-itri-part-one/ for more info on the feast in Itri.

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Historic Federal Hill

Historic Federal Hill | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Historic Federal Hill is the “Heartbeat of Providence” and begins at Atwells Avenue, the great street that flows under the arch.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Mix of Italian and American culture in Rhode Island. Not as big as the North End in Boston, or Little Italy in New York City, but full of the same Italian atmoshpere.  Great place to be for the Colombus Day feast.  Also if your old enough to remember Joe Acorn's Market great fresh Italian food back in the day. Also home of Caserta Pizza, Venda Ravioli and many other Italian resturants.  Check out http://www.littleitalynyc.com/ and http://www.northendboston.com/ for othe close Italian cultural areas.

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Breakfasts Around the World


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks lke all of these are in some way combined to be an American breakfast.  Since this country is a melting pot you mihgt just get a mix of breakfast foods from different cultures in one American breakfast.  You can have have the English eggs, over easy it looks like, with a French pastries.  A full mix of culture and you might still me in pj's.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It hard to report rape cases even here in the US.  It must be ten fold that in places like India, and much of the middle east, where women traditionally in thse areas of the world as always been in a lower status of men.  The women for years, for generations in fact have always been told that their place in lower than that of men. That if something happened to them it must be their fault.  However with globalization and access to the world as a whole, women, and the men, of these societies have been shown that this is not what it is like in the rest of the world.  The women do not have to accept what they have been told even though it has been drilled into their head over and over.  With women in India inceasing their percentage in the workforce, and being education this extreme situation is going to slowly change.  There have been alot of negative aspects of globalization, this however may well be one of the postive aspects of globalization, especially to the women in the areas of the world where this type of behavior is all too common. 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:37 PM

It is hearting to see the police force in the modernized area taking such a strong stance. As the article showed it is greatly needed because the reason rape largely happens is because the traditional aspects of Indian culture continue on strongly in the village areas. These men were told for the longest time that women cannot amount to anything and for them to act free is wrong. This type of thinking is heavily engrained into the members of the society so they won’t just stop acting this way on their own accord. Arresting and convicting these men will send a message that their actions are not tolerated and aren’t right despite what they were taught.

 

 It also amazes me that this stance exists because the modernized area were also told these stories at one point too. The only explanation I have for the differences is that the more modernized areas are more welcoming of the freedoms seen in the West. To be clear though, the freedoms are more of a western trait. Thus globalization in this instance might have actually helped the positive result of the police force come about because of the positive influence seen in the Western countries economy and life style when they let women have more freedom.

 

Unfortunately, globalization can’t completely solve rape just yet. The article ends by asserting that to report rape “is a very difficult thing in the Indian context.” Yet, reporting rape anywhere is hard to do. In fact, the mention of 1 in 10 under reported rapes is a statistic similar to that of the United States. Similarly, many victims will refuse to cooperate or even contemplate taking their own life to avoid testimony (in fact many do). In either situation, most rape victims feel they lost their “honor.”  I am not sure when reporting rape or how reporting rape will ever become any easier. However whichever country can figure it out will need to show the rest of the world how. As I do look forward to the day that globalization could decrease rape on a large scale. 

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Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:17 PM

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:00 PM

Uighurs are being pushed out of their homeland because of Han Chinese migration. This article is accurate when it claims that the amount of publicity the region gets is minimum. This makes the Uighurs more at risk than Tibet. With so much attention put on areas elsewhere, China will face less international push back as it over takes yet another region who wishes to maintain its autonomy and culture.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:54 PM

I believe that without doubt today it is a bad time to be a minority in China. The Chinese are experiencing a great deal of nationalism and in turn placing economic barriers on the minorities in order to drive them out of regions so the government will be able to repopulate them with Han Chinese. While the Han Chinese have always been the majority within China its only recently the government has decided to provide them with advancement at the risk of the other ethnic groups within China. 

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Waterfire downtown Providence, Rhode Island at Water Place Park

Waterfire downtown Providence, Rhode Island at Water Place Park | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Photo by Mark Corbett. Here is a photo I took in the Summer in Providence, Rhode Island at the Water Place Park during one of the Waterfire events held in Providence RI.
Al Picozzi's insight:

What is considered part of downtown Providence, RI today.  Alot different from the picture that I have scooped from 1945 Westminster Street picture.  The similarities, all the activiity, just look at the number of people at Waterplace Park.  Compare it to this picture http://blogs.providencejournal.com/ri-talks/architecture-here-there/brisprovwest.JPG of Westminster Street today.  You still see the shopper and some fo the cars, however to be the "downtown" has shifted a bit and expanded.  To me to be downtown is to be where things are happening, where people go, not just work and shop.  Waterfire is a great cultural activity that brings life to downtown, artist show their work, street performers, and just people mixing, talking, etc.  That is what downtown is to me.  It changes over time and what is downtown in Providence, RI is going to be different that what one might consider downtown in Rome, Italy, New York, NY or even Cranston, RI.

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Money Won’t Help Land a Place in This Oasis, but a Uniform May

Money Won’t Help Land a Place in This Oasis, but a Uniform May | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Fort Hamilton is a vestige of New York Harbor’s rich military history and a top housing choice for service members looking for a slice of military suburbia about 40 minutes from Manhattan.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A nice place to live in a suburb outsdie of the big city life.  Great to see that we are taking care of the people that take care of us each and every day.  I think that is part of the American culture and tradition that needs to be passed on to our children and beyond. 

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Rabbi-Chaplains of the Civil War

Rabbi-Chaplains of the Civil War | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A controversial proposition, a receptive president and some surprising support.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see how our belief and our culture of religious freedom was used to help get Rabbis into the Union Army to serve the Jewish soldiers that were fighting.

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Developers have WWII airfield in their sights

Developers have WWII airfield in their sights | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
During an anniversary ceremony in Hawaii several years ago, retired Marine Maj. John Hughes described the scene of the surprise attack by the Japanese on the island on Dec. 7, 1941.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A battle here going on historical importance and culture on one side and the need to develop on the other.  the City Council of Honolulu gave the ok to develop the area of Ewa Filed.  This was one of the airfields that was attacked during the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941.  Many people do not want this to happen as it is an important to them for the memory it serves, no less important in their eyes to say the Arizona Memorial.  We need, as a culture, in my opinion to keep this historical sites free from development so we know where we have come from and where we need to go in the future.

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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

If you take a look back at history, the only people to ever sucessfully conquer Afghanistan were the Mongols.  The rugged, mountainous terrain made this plac hard to live in and hard to control.  The Mongols were a very mobile people and were able to control the area by aslo being very tolerant of the natives.  Eventually it bacame hard to notice the difference between a Mongol and a native Afghan, they assimilated the Mongols. 

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 2015 2:59 PM

In this video Jennifer L. Fluri explains the borders of Afghanistan. At first Afghanistan was used as a border outline between Russia and British India. The border facing India was named the Durand line, after Sir Durand, who convinced the leader of Afghanistan to respect the line.  There is Iranian/Persian influence in Afghanistan also with the celebration of Nowruz, the Iranian/Persian New Year. That is because Southern Afghanistan was part of Iran in 1502-1736, under the Safavid Empire. Also Dari is one of the main languages spoken in Afghanistan which came from Persia. She ends the video saying “where Afghanistan is today both culturally and geopolitically has to do with their geography”

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 7:15 AM

Afghanistan's current borders are the result of political maneuvering between empires. Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor is a result of this political maneuvering. The corridor was created in order to prevent the Russian Empire and British India from sharing a common border. While many afghans may decry the notion, Afghanistan has been shaped by foreign influence. The same can be said for almost every other nation on the globe. Almost all borders are determined by some from of political maneuvering. Our borders with Mexico and Canada have been determined through treaties and wars.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 12:24 PM

As I have learned more about the world, it's been interesting to see how arbitrary national borders can sometimes be. I think we are taught in school to associate "nations" with "nationalism," and although that is generally the case for most industrialized nations (whose citizens generally feel they are "nationals" within their own borders), it is not always true for the rest of the world. We see this in the numerous ethnic disputes in African nations, in the violent Yugoslav wars in Europe, and today with the Kurd uprising in Syria and Iraq- we see ill-defined borders that do not meet the needs of their peoples, nations that do not encompass the same sentiments of nationalism. As a result, we see indifference between these various peoples at best, or open conflict between varying ethnic and ideological groups at worst. Afghanistan as we know it today is not the result of self-determination or a sense of nationalism, but geopolitical jockeying between Russia and the United Kingdom. It is not a nation, but a political buffer.

As a result, Afghanistan does not act as a single nation- it may have a central government, but that government is incredibly weak, and people in remote areas often do not even know of its existence. Afghanistan is a series of small city-states and even more isolated settlements clumped together behind arbitrarily drawn lines, living their lives in much the same manner their ancestors did 1,000 years ago. This has made the mountainous, isolated regions of the nation a haven for terrorists and religious extremism, posing a serious issue in the region that, despite billions of dollars and a decade of fighting, the US has been unable to find a solution for. Divided amongst itself, Afghanistan is a nation in name only, something that the West likes to place on the map because of a dispute between two global powers nearly 2 centuries ago.

 

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Catholic Church Has Shifted Southward

Catholic Church Has Shifted Southward | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In 1900, two-thirds of the world’s Catholics lived in Europe. Today only 20 percent do.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:02 PM

As Europe has become an increasingly secularized set of societies, the demographic based of the Catholic Church has shifted south.  However, the power structure has not migrated south as the European cardinals still are a majority (although 2/3 vote necessary to elect the next pope). 


Tags: Christianity, culture, diffusionreligion.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 7:26 PM
With the shift south I think that was one of the main reasons the Pope was chosen from a South American country. It really is the only place the Catholic religion is growing
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 3:34 PM

Religion

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Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars?

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
King Abdullah announced on Sunday that  Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in municipal elections beginning in 2015.

 

Driving a car as simple as it may sound, is a method of enhancing mobility and that means freedom of spatial expression.  This decision to allow women to vote has only demonstrated the cultural constraints of gender roles and how much more progress is needed.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This amazing to see that women still have very little rights in this kingdom.  Again like the article state the right to vote in Saudia Arabia is noting, especially when compared to the right to vote in the US.  This is still a monarchy, ruled by a family from above, not a constitiutional monarchy like the UK, there is no parliament and  the elections can be canceleld at any time.  To the Saudi's giving the women the right to drive goes against their very culture, their belief that women need to be subserviate to men.  The right to vote, since it is meaningless, means nothing to advacne women's rights in Saudia Arabia.  The king really is not giving anything at all, he is just making it look like he is...interesting.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:04 PM

(Central Asia topic 5 [independent topic])

The decrees made by Saudi Arabia's King regarding women's future rights are being viewed as empty promises. On top of that, this topic is at the convergence of not just political, but also social and religious topics. Political, social, economic, and religious interests are all tugging issues such as women's rights to vote and drive in different directions.

I am surprised this article did not mention something which I had heard before: the Saudi government still does not allow women to drive not only out of social custom, but also because their highways are facing a congestion problem. Giving women drivers licenses could roughly double the number of cars on the already-gridlocked roads, making commuting and transportation even more of a hassle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:51 PM

What I find interesting is that allowing women to vote seems like a big step towards equality but it may be more superficial at addressing the real issue at hand. Women in this country are living with so much constraint, letting them vote may not be the giant step forward it seems to be. There are still cultural and institutional barriers that restraint the freedom and natural rights of women.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:40 AM

This decision is absolutely meaningless. Elections matter little in Saudi Arabia. The nation is an Absolute Monarchy. The Kings word on all issues is absolute. On the other hand driving a car, is a much more important symbol of freedom. Allowing women to drive, would give them a sense of mobility. Driving in all most every culture is associated with independence. The car allows you to travel anywhere you want, and avoids the trap of relying on others for transportation. By driving a car, you essentially achieve a certain level of independence. By keeping women from driving, you keep them from achieving independence, and force them to be dependent on the males in their lives.    

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is change is the immigration from Mexico will also change the deographics of the area into which they are moving.  Higher incomes, more businesses, more employment in that area that will hopefully spread to other areas.  This is an unforseen result of the drug wars and although it is a positive result, the violence will need to stop.  As it improves the economic situation in the US it worses in the area of Mexico where these type of people are needed.  Legitimate businesses are leaving Mexico leaving a vacume that is going to be filled by the cartels, which will make the problems grow.  While this is a postive for the US in the areas where they are moving to, it is also a negative for Mexico and in the long run a negative for the US.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?