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Pearl Harbor memories fading with time

Pearl Harbor memories fading with time | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
You could hardly escape reminders of it during World War II. And over the course of decades since, Dec. 7 has meant one thing to generations of Americans: Pearl Harbor. Unprovoked attack.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just a small reminder of what today is and what it means to many Americans.  My grandparents told me about this when they were alive.  How unexpected it was, how shocking it was and how angry they, as well as many Americans were.  My grandparents have all passed away, but I made sure I told my kids about the importance of this day.  It is something that never should be forgotten.  This act reunited a nation in one common cause that I do not think has happened again.  There was only one purpose after December 7, 1941....to win a war that we did not start.

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Son says US war vet father, 85, detained by NKorea

Son says US war vet father, 85, detained by NKorea | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The son of an 85-year-old American veteran of the Korean War says his father was detained in North Korea as he sat in a plane set to leave the country.
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Korean War never end.  Only an armistice was signed not a peace treaty.  Seems the North sees this 85 year old US veteran as a threat.  This area is the home to the worlds most heavily defended border in the world.  All you need is a spark to set it off.  The missle tests, the nuclear program, the human rights violations and now the detaining of a US veteran that happened a month ago and still no word on the man.  Seems that a spark might be coming.  Let's all hope it doesn't.

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Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely?

Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Month after his meeting with Manmohan Singh, Nawaz Sharif said nuclear war is likely between India, Pakistan over Kashmir. He will meet Barack Obama in US.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Kashmir is still a hot spot in the world especially when thw two powers involved but have nuclear weapons and both seem willing to at least say they are still on the table in any conflict.  A long problem starting back when lines were drawn on the map by Imperial Britain.  Much like in Africa, however, nukes, at least as far as we know, are not on the table in Africa....yet.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 13, 2013 5:12 PM

Kashmir is a hot spot in the world  whith the two powers involved having nuclear weapons and both are willing say they are still on the table for a conflict.  

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5 Historical Monuments Have Been Destroyed Forever During Syria's Civil War

5 Historical Monuments Have Been Destroyed Forever During Syria's Civil War | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Syria's incredible historical heritage is being blasted to pieces.

 

As Syria's tragic civil war continues without a resolution in sight, the conflict's death toll continues to soar. But this isn't the only disastrous consequence of the conflict — Syria's breathtaking historical and architectural heritage is being blasted to pieces by the ongoing civil war, too.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The human toll is the worst result of this civil war, but there is the loss of historical and cultural sites that will also hurt this entire region.  The castle above is one of the finest examples of a Crusader Castle build in the old Crusader Kingdoms.  Having a western architecture smack in the Middle East is just awe inspirering.  The beautiful mosques that have been destroyed is like having Norte Dame in Paris destroyed, it is part of their past, their culture.  The human cost is immeasurable, but so is the historical loss.

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How Israel's Military Success Erased the History of the Diaspora's Jewish Warriors

How Israel's Military Success Erased the History of the Diaspora's Jewish Warriors | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
How Israel's Military Success Erased the History of the Diaspora's Jewish Warriors
Tablet Magazine
The historian Derek J. Penslar starts his masterful new book, Jews and the Military: A History, with an anecdote.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A look at how Jews have served in other militaries and how this led to them to be fighting for the Jewish state of Israel.  Jew have long servered in many western armies, but espiecailly with the British in WW I when they lobbied, sucessfully, to be part of the liberation of the Jerusalem from the Ottoman Empire.  There is a long military tradition that Israel has, even though the state of Israel only came into being in 1948. 

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Ukraine: West or east?

Ukraine: West or east? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
ITS very name means “borderland”. Ukraine has long been on the edge between east and west. Now this country of 46m people is poised to tilt westward by signing...

Via Paige McClatchy
Al Picozzi's insight:

Going to be an intersting situation.  Aside from the issues with Russia, will the Ukraine be willing to lose some autonomy and follow the rules, especailly the human rights rules, of the EU.  How much are they willing to give up to be free from Russian influence?  Will they be willing to what some might say is trading one master, Russia, for another, the EU?  What will be the Russian reaction to this, especailly with all the gas they receive from Russia?  Goingt o be an intersting situation soon in this area of the world.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 7, 2013 3:00 AM

The Ukraine is currently stuck in a tug-of-war between the EU and a Russian contrived Central Asian trade agreement. The Economist believes that, thanks to Putin's bullying, the Ukraine will land in the EU's lap. This softpower fight between East and West is a remnant of the Cold War. 

Al Picozzi's comment, October 9, 2013 9:31 PM
Going to be an interesting situation. Russian with its long control of this area historically, from about the mid 17th century until its independence in 1991. Is it Russian fears of the "West" being so close to its border, remeber it was invaded many times from the west, Napoleon, Germany twice, from other western countries during the Russian civil war, including the US? or is it pure ecomonic to compete with the EU or just to deny the EU another member? Another Cold War coming, this one not involving the US?
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The U.S. Plan to Invade Canada: War Plan Red

The U.S. Plan to Invade Canada: War Plan Red | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A time-honored tradition in the U.S. military, contingency plans have been drawn up for the defense against, and invasion of, most major military powers. In fact, in response to recent events on the Korean peninsula, the U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

And you all thought that the US/Canadian border was going to be safe...well it is...now.  Seems that both sides made plans to invade each other in the 1920s.  Seems that there are contingency plans for everything.  With the relations that we see today, its had to believe that such plans are even necessary...however don't forgot your history.  The US was invaded from Canada by the British during the revolution and we also invaded Canada in both the Revoultion and the War of 1812.  Check out this little article for a brief War of 1812 history http://forgottenhistory.blogspot.com/2007/05/united-states-invades-canada.html ; So imagine now if we did not enjoy what is considered the longest undefended border on the planet??  What would life be like along an unfriendly border that stretches from the Atlantic to the Pacific and the long Alaskan/Canadian border??  Nice to live next to a counrty and not have the North Korea/Sout Korea mentality.

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Obama cancels meeting with Putin amid Snowden tensions

Obama cancels meeting with Putin amid Snowden tensions | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In a rare diplomatic snub, President Obama is canceling plans to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow next month. 
Al Picozzi's insight:

So, the cold war is over...hmm maybe not.  This issue with the tension in Iran and Syria seems to remind me of the 1980s disputes witht he old Soviet Union.  Seems the US and the Russians are going to butt heads once again.  Will this one last 50+ years? Or is this just another case of seeing who is goiong to blink first and get back to normal relations?  Going to be interesting watch.  See history does tend to repeat itself.

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Georgian PM Meets Rasmussen, Discusses NATO And Russia

Georgian PM Meets Rasmussen, Discusses NATO And Russia | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Georgian Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili says his country will continue on its course of "joining NATO as soon as possible."

Following talks in Tbilisi with visiting NATO Secretar...
Al Picozzi's insight:

So the main question here is, will Russia allow Georgia, which it fought a short five day war in 2008, to join NATO? With this country right against the border of Russia, will they feel even more surrounded?  Estonia, Latvia and Lituania have joined NATO and there are talks also with the Ukraine about membership.  Will Russia allow it? Do they have a choice?  They went to war once with Georgia, why not again?

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Japanese Minister Proposes More Active Military Presence in Region

Japanese Minister Proposes More Active Military Presence in Region | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Actions by China and North Korea are leading Japan to consider a more aggressive military posture after decades of postwar pacifism.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Given their geographic loaction, the geopolitcis of the area are going to force the Japanese to reverse its stance on the military since the end of World War II.  Some in the government want to change the post-war constitution and change the JSDF, Japanese Self-Defense Force, into a full military not just a self-defense force.

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A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next

A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Prof. Arnon Sofer sets out the link between drought, Assad’s civil war, and the wider strains in the Middle East; Jordan and Gaza are also in deep trouble, he warns

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that water, not oil, might be the cheif source of conflict in North Africa, the Middle East, and Africa in general in the near future.  Water, like food, is the most basic resource we need to survive.  If that is cut off people as well as nations are more likely to go war over water, since we know they will over oil.  The climate change is more than just rising water on coast lines, it effects the water supply of nations and regions that have issues getting fresh water even without the climate change.  Seems we have to solve the water problem, as well as the oil problem now.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:25 PM

The article explains how population growth, climate change, drought, and water shortages could have contributed to the rise of war in Syria. This is an interesting interpretation, one which certainly could have been a contributing factor, but not all the Arab Spring can be attributed to water shortages so it is not a direct cause. The water shortages in Syria and a lack of government response certainly could have fanned flames which already existed due to an oppressive regime and regional conflicts. Climate change gets a lot of attention for the potential damage it could do to the environment, but I had not given much thought to the conflicts it could cause between nations and peoples.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:22 PM

Egypt may be the next country to be in deep trouble. With so many militant attacks coming out of Egypt to being with there is no surprise that the Middle East thinks it will be next on the list.

Pamela Hills's curator insight, July 18, 2014 1:37 PM

 A world at war and hot spots are growing with people caught in middle <3

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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

Via Seth Dixon
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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 11:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 7:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 5:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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From Victim to (Mutual) Aggressor: South Sudan's Disastrous First Year

From Victim to (Mutual) Aggressor: South Sudan's Disastrous First Year | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The new African country, founded in part to escape from the northern government's violence, is showing some hostility of its own.

 

Independence for ethnic/religious groups, while culturally satisfying, does not necessarily solve all the problems within a region.  South Sudan's 1-year anniversary shows that even though they have a short history, it has been marked by ineffective governance and social instability.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This shows that gaining your independence might be hard, but the actual creation of the new state is harder.  Sometimes the new governement will impose the same methods the old "mother" country used that caused the split int he first place.  They need to ask themselves the hard questions about their actions: Are we turing into the old country?  Are we swapping one repressive and agressvie government for another?  Again one needs to look to the past, learn form it and not make the same mistakes..or else what I like saying...history will repeat itself.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:51 PM

The fighting between the Republic of Sudan and south Sudan belongs to a different category of armed conflict, a product of internal politics and external pressures suspisons both real and imagined that launched an uncontrollable war, a war that could have been prevented.   

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 10:32 PM

This is probably a bad comparison, but say an expansion sports team has just been created for the new upcoming season.  There are new players, new equipment, and new managers to run the team.  Many of these new areas probably have little to no experience with each other professionally, so therefore flaws are inevitable.  In a way, the only way to go is up and mistakes which surely will be made can be used to change for the better in the future.  That being said, a new country with new officals, flags, and economy to name a few are all in a "trial run."  No one should expect them to suddenly become prosperous and great over a few years span.  Just like a new team, a country takes time to develop, people to gain comfort, and regulations and norms for people to follow.  I mean, even Rome wasn't built in a day.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:39 PM

This war could have been prevented. The Republic of Sudan and South Sudan are fighting over problems that may or may not exist.  Independence does not always solve the problems within a region, as shown in the case of South Sudan.  

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2010: Lost WWII battlefield found -– war dead included. Remained untouched since 1942 - WAR HISTORY ONLINE

2010: Lost WWII battlefield found -– war dead included. Remained untouched since 1942 - WAR HISTORY ONLINE | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
An Australian trekker said he has discovered the site of a significant World War II battle in the jungles of Papua New Guinea, complete with the remains of Japanese soldiers right where they fell almost 70 years ago.

Via Graeme Hosken
Al Picozzi's insight:

An amazing discovery that was left alone since 1942.  You have to remember in this part of the South Pacific there was major fighting in this area.  The Battle of the Coral Sea and Guadalcanal were very important turning points in World War II.  The British and the Australians, mainly the Australians, stopped the Japanese advance on their march to take Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea which was a majpr base which stopped the Japanese from invading Australia.  This theater of war was extremely important that covered thousands and thousands of miles, even greater than the land war on the Eastern Front.

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Civil War Battles & Casualties

Civil War Battles & Casualties | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is just an amazing resource that tells the military side of the Civil War.  This war claimed more US casualties than World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam combined.  A great resource to use to show the geogaphy of the war, the theaters of war that were themost imortant and how the Union wanted to fight the war.  Watch the time lapse of the map and it will show the pattern of the conflict as the war progressed.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:11 PM

Awesome interactive map of Civil War battles

Arlis Groves's curator insight, November 26, 2013 2:09 AM

This interactive map can be a helpful resource for details about battle casualties.

Teresa M. Nash's comment, November 28, 2013 7:20 AM
Awesome!
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WWII Doolittle Raiders make final toast in Ohio

WWII Doolittle Raiders make final toast in Ohio | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The surviving members of Doolittle Raiders made a last toast to their fallen comrades with a bottle of 1896 cognac from Lt. Gen. James Doolittle himself.
Al Picozzi's insight:

One of the most iconic pictures of World War II when a B-25 takes off from the carrier USS Hornet to attack Toyko only moths after Peal Harbor.  With the war in Europe going bad at this stage and the Pacific War all going the way of the Japanese, this moral boost is what started the turn around.  These men knew this was really a one way mission, though most survived, but still did the impossible..attacked the Japanese at home.  This shocked the Japanese which caused them to divert more resources to protect the home islands at a time they could have been used elsewhere.  This was in April of 1942.  In May of 1942 the Japanese were stopped at the Battle of the Coral Sea and in June of 1942 the were decisively beaten at the Battle of Midway.  From that point on, until 1945 the Japanese were in retreat.  All of this started by men make a small but huge morale boosting raid on Toyko.  They should never be forgotten.

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Israel strikes Russian weapons shipment in Syria

Israel strikes Russian weapons shipment in Syria | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The attack was confirmed by an Obama administration official. The revelation came as Syria met a deadline to destroy chemical production facilities.
Al Picozzi's insight:

The situation is Syria is still in flux and very dangerous.  It seems that they are cooperating with the chemical weapon sanctions that the UN wants but they are still buying Russian weapons for Hezbollah.  Israel has struck before at weapons bound of Hezbollah from Syria.  The weapons are usually long range missles that Hezbollah can use against aircraft, ships and land targets fired from inside Syria.  State support terrorism..I think this shows it is still around.....

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Nairobi attack: Moment Kenya mall terrorist executes shopper in cold blood

Nairobi attack: Moment Kenya mall terrorist executes shopper in cold blood | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The shocking footage, which emerged only yesterday, shows the moment terrified men, women and children run for their lives from the attackers
Al Picozzi's insight:

This just show how terrorism is a fact a life even in Africa.  The Somali based terror group al-Shabab claimed responsibility for the attck in response to Kenya attacking al-Shabab in Somalia.  Kenya said it attacked into Somalia in response to the terroist activity of al-Shabab.  It is a vicious circle.  Also it has come out that the terrorists did come there with the express purpose of killing non-Muslims as they let them identify themselves and leave the mall.  With Somalia still really lawless and no central governement it is likely these attacks will continue.  This will prompt Kenya, and I believe other countries in Africa to try and control these groups even if in Somalia.  This will just continue the cycle.  The first step to stop this is to get a government in Somalia.  In a related story, see http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2013/09/2013923205423372989.html the FM of Kenya states the the group al-Shabab is under the control of al-Qaeda which shows that this group is still very active.

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Cuban Missile Crisis - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

Cuban Missile Crisis - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just a look back of what the relations were in the 1960s and how close the US and the USSR came to full blown nuclear war.  I asked both my parents what it was like in 1962 during this time.  Both of them said it was a scary time.  Nuclear attack drills daily when this was going on in October 1962.  This area so close to the US geographically made a huge difference even though the Soviets had missles that could reach the US from Russia and elswhere in Europe.  It was the fact that there would be so little warning of a launch and that it was right in our "back yard"...remember the Monroe Doctrine.  Kennedy invoked its use in order to stop the missiles.  But now times have changed..see my next scoop...

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 25, 2013 4:22 PM

The Cuban Missle Crisis was a very scary moment for the world and is a very blatant example of how the US managed/used coersion in their relationships with Latin American countries during the Cold War. Geographically, the fall of Cuba to communism was a huge blow to the United States because it represented a severe military threat. The US sought to control all of South America and democratize it in the Cold War because of its geographically strategic position to the US.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:59 PM

A look back at a scary time during October 1962 when the US and USSR where close to a nuclear missle war. It was filled with days of nuclear safety drills and fear of the unknown while Kennedy worked hard to get the situation under control.

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A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums

A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
While light on details, a Russian proposal for Syria to turn over chemical weapons shifts the war debate.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I understand the need to do something and I also understand why Americans do not want to do this.  However I believe something should be done as it seems we all are forgetting our history.  Does anyone remember 9/30/1938.  A speech given by then British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain promised "...peace of our time."  He was talking about the Munich Agreement where Hitler promised that Czechoslovakia would be his last territorial grab.  Well we all know what that led to.  We cannot appease or let people get away with actions like this.  If he is allowed to use the gas on his own people whats to stop him from using it on Turkey, Israel or even in the US as part of a terrorist attack.  Just something else to think about .. an old quote which is a paraphrase, those who do not learn history will be doomed to repeat it.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:36 PM

The world is waiting to see how the drama in the Middle East unfolds. 

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ANOTHER FACE: U.S. military stronghold keeping watch over the Pacific

ANOTHER FACE: U.S. military stronghold keeping watch over the Pacific | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Under the Obama administration, a strategic pivoting to Asia will see 60 percent of the U.S. Navy's fleet based in the Pacific Ocean by 2020. This has been described as a strategic "rebalance" to strengthen the U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A change in the geopolitics of the Pacific Area.  With the growing of the Chinese Navy with their new aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, and the economic importance of the area, the US will ship 80% of the navy to Pacific waters.  Hawaii's importance as a military base has now increased, or at least returned to the same level as in WWII.  Showing a shift of importance away from the Atlantic waters and Europe.

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China military urges vigilance over Japan's defense plan

China military urges vigilance over Japan's defense plan | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

China's response to the action that the Japanese might want to increase their military.  Interesting to see that China feels Japan should not be in fear of China's military, even though they just completed their first aircraft carrier.  They also refer to Japan's World War II past...is that fear really there, that Japan will do the same thing.  The Chinese also feel that Japan has not done enough to atone for their past action in China in WWII.  Intersting especially from a country with questionable human rights violations.

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British have invaded nine out of ten countries - so look out Luxembourg

British have invaded nine out of ten countries - so look out Luxembourg | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks like the British wanted to make everyone mad.  Remember the old say "the sun never set on the British Empire."  Now you can see how that can be true.

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The drug wars are still around, but as the artical states it is being done is less public ways and in remote areas.  The drug lords will not push to much for if they do they will bring more of the military on them, not just the local police which really could not stop them.  Also the more publilc it is the more the US would want to get involved to try to stem the problem.  The will continue to lay low as this type of story dies down and the US focuses on something else, like Syria at the moment.

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 6:45 PM

Looks like President Enrique Nieto has shifted tactics in Mexico's fight against the drug trade. When he won election from Felipe Calderon he changed the way he portrayed his country. No more would he parade alleged drug dealers and overlords before they went to trial. This would only infuriate the drug lords and they sought revenge by seeking out police to either kill, or bribe, further deteriorating the uneasy truce between the government and the drug trade. By keeping this off the news and promoting Mexico's other needs such as trade, education reform, and reduction of poverty.

The mass killings have been kept mostly out of the spotlight and the body count is still the same, but Nieto can now fight this fight largely out of the public's eye. The drug related killings have moved to the northern territories away from cameras and the public. This should afford him opportunity to focus on this problem and keep the public from thinking Armageddon is around the corner.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 29, 2015 7:38 PM

Mexico is a country that is still dealing with gangs and violence throughout the entire country. Gangs from Los Zetas to Los Sinaloas are constantly search of more power and reign over territories in Mexico. This article simply describes that the efforts against violence and drugs have not been resolved in the country, but it has got "quieter" in regards of violence against military or police officials. Between 2007 to 2012 attacks on military officials increased but recently they have been diminishing. The gangs have realized that having a war against military officials only brings more attention to them. The gangs are still fighting each other, but are not bombing or having urban gun battles in the middle of 'loud' cities. 

Big boarder cities like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez murder rate has dropped 80% since 2010. The question is, where are is the violence and attacks of cartel vs. cartel taking place? The area of battle is now in Torreon. This city of manufacturing, mining, and farming, is now one of the most dangerous cities in Mexico due to gang violence. It makes sense to draw attention to a city where industries are important. Another reason for the battles is because its the area between Los Zetas and Los Sinoloas territory. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 6:34 PM

It is interesting to know that the drug cartel violent s has slowly been decreasing from public views. Violence from the war on drugs on the Mexico border with the United States has been a huge issue for a while post 9/11. They are finally trying to avoid conflicts with the government, specifically the military and police  because it will only bring more pressure to them. It is a smart thing to keep violence of the streets but out in places where there the cartels can draw less attention, murders and trafficking still exist. It is important to understand that a huge problem like this does not just vanished completely, but changes overtime and shift to other quiet places.  

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The weird, violent history of the Indo-Pakistani border.

 

Geography rarely makes sense without the added lens of history.  This fantastic article chonicles the history of the geopolitical conflict between India and Pakistan, centering on the disputed Kashmir region.  This border is tied into colonial, cultural, political and religious layers of identity.  As one of the great unresolved issues of the colonial era, this standoff may loom large as India becomes increasingly significant on the global scale.     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:07 AM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani?