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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  Looks like my state will be underwater.  An amazng graphic that really puts into perspective the reality of rising ocean levels. 

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico

Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As climate change alters rainfall patterns and river flows, tensions are bound to rise between states and countries that share rivers that cross their borders. In the Rio Grande Basin of the American Southwest, that future inevitability has arrived.

Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 7:34 PM
Even in the US water supply can still be an issue.
Kate Makin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 7:23 AM

Social Impact

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:57 PM

Both Texas and New Mexico share the water supply that is giving by the rivers that cross between the border and can have a profound effect on the growth of farmland and agriculture of both Texas and New Mexico, which shows that many places can be effected by the geography that is intertwined among places in the world.*

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Inside the Colorado deluge

Inside the Colorado deluge | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Two things that helped make this rainfall historic are breadth and duration. Colorado can get much higher rainfall rates for brief periods and over small areas."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Almost seems like a perfect storm scenario.  Large amouts of rain over a long perod of time over a large area.  This combined with a late summer/early fall heat wave and tons of moisture in the air, with climate change all contributed to the disater in Colorado.  They also believe the changes made by people to the physical geography over the last hundred years or somade have contributed to teh flooding in the area.  Development can effect the way a place floods.  Where there were once open fields and trees, there are now parking lots and houses which just can't absorb rainfall.  Makes you ask the question, shouldn't there be more study of where we exapnd our cities and what effect this will have in case of a major rainfall, earthquake, blizzard, etc?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2013 8:20 AM

Our thoughts are with our colleagues and friends in Colorado as they are dealing with the impact of this historic weather event.  The geographic factors that contributed to this flooding are explained in this article from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).  Some are calling this a millennial flood, as it is well past the 100-year stage of flooding.  You may view the areas impacted on an ESRI storymap. and in this NASA imagery


Tags: physical, disasters, environment, water, weather and climate.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 16, 2013 3:40 PM

The devastating flooding in Colorado has impacted so many. The rainfall Colorado has experienced makes it the most on record. The massive amounts of flooding and devestation in areas like Boulder are caused by the highly populated valley areas.  

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, September 18, 2013 5:27 PM

      What was interesting about this particular deluge was how much rain fell and how it happened in such a short time. Meteroligist high wet density levels of vapor that rose to high altitutdes and was able to condense into water and help in a perfect combination of weather to create a powerfully dangerous flash flood.

    The article recounts a former major colorodo flood that occured in 1978 and had killed over 150 people during a centenial celebration.

   After this occurence warning signs were put up beside the roads to warn travelers of flash flood possiblities and to promote safety. These floods do not happen in Colorado often and are usually a surprise. They do not when the nextmajor flash flood may occur in the boulder region but they know through historical patterns that it will happen again. 

This article stood out to me because I have friends that live in these areas and had to run for safety and move their cars to prevent damage in these same areas. The good thing is that the people that I know from this area are doing ok.

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Floods Show What Lies Ahead for Sinking Bangkok

Floods Show What Lies Ahead for Sinking Bangkok | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The Thai capital, built on swampland, is slowly sinking and the floods in Bangkok could be merely a foretaste of a grim future as climate change makes its...

 

If 'natural' disasters are becoming more fierce and impacting human societies more, we need to ask ourselves: are the physical geographic systems shifting independently or is it human society that is causing the changes?  Is it the force of the hurricanes, earthquakes, floods etc. that have intensified or is the way within which humans live on the land that make us more susceptible and vulnerable to the effects of these disasters?    


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that sinking cities is not just a problem for Venice.  As the cities grow larger and more and more land is needed, small cities that were built on unstable land are now larger.  These new cities cannot  be supported by the land they were originally built on.  As the natural disasters occur, and we know they will, they are intensified by the fact that a city has grown and more people are there.  There will always be natural disasters, but when a major flood hits and unpopulated area it is still a natural disaster just not on the same scale as hitting a city that is overpopulated or built up to a point where the land it is on just can't support it.  It is the human part of the disaster that makes it much more then just a natural disaster.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:17 PM

This situation with Bangkok is the same problem that New Orleans is facing. Building on lands that used to get regular deposits of silt is a bad idea. The ground not only continues to compact and essentially "sink" but the planet is covered in water that changes level regularly. Unfortunately, New Orleans has shown that levees don't really work and the earth will always reclaim the land it wants back.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 12:44 PM

Bangkok is one of the many cities that is severely threatened by flooding. Bangkok's slow sinking into the marshland combined with sea level rise could prove fatal for this city. Already the capital experiences major flooding, and officials are considering the prospect of moving the city. Otherwise, billions of dollars a year would be required to stave off the effects of climate change. 

 

Now that coastal cities (especially highly populated cities) are at more threat than ever from climate change, countries are going to have to figure out a way to battle the issue. Should we fight to maintain these lands, or do we allow them to return to nature? Natural environments are better able to buffer natural disasters such as storms and floods, but the cost, both culturally and economically would be incomprehensible.