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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing turn around in policies that have been in force for decades.  Well it really is changing I think for self interest and globalization and world pressure.  First of all their population is aging rapdily and they themselves stated they will face a labor shortage if the policy doesn't change, and they will need the workforce in this global market.  Also the abolishing of the labor camps, though not said directly in the news caste you can infer that with CNN finding that the labor camps were making exported goods, the Chinese government was probably feeling pressure from world governemts to stop the practice or the exports could be effected.  With India's economic strenght growing the Chinese will need to be competitive in the global market.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:26 AM

Throughout many years China has always had strict laws on how many children families should have. They recently started to ease their laws to allow people to have more than one child. I could see why they had their laws be only one child because they have such a big population. I also disagree with it because families should be able to have as many children as they want. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 5:09 PM

The one-child policy has caused more problems than it has solved. China now has a larger male population than its female population and competition for brides is rampant. The labor camps were not actually training people in the way they wanted to, it was just an excuse to lock up people for petty crime and get free labor out of them. Hopefully, China will continue analyzing their social policies and making changes to better the country

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:32 PM

The one-child labor law is one that should be extinct now. China needs to up their standards of living and allow people their freedom of choice. Who cares if the living situations are crammed to begin with? People need to have their right to choose how many children they do or don't have.

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China bypasses American ‘New Silk Road’ with two of its own

China bypasses American ‘New Silk Road’ with two of its own | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
China aims to secure energy supplies with large Central and Southeast Asian investments.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems the Silk Road is making a comeback ni Central Asia.  China wants to make sure it has access to new gas and oil of the new Central Asian republics like Kazakhstan.  Once used as the major overland trade route to the west, the silk road is being reborn.  So is sea trade through the Strait of Malacca, whcih was huge in the 14th, 15th,16th and 17th centuries.  China is using its money and influence in the area to reopen these "silk roads."  Even Chinese President Xi Jinping talked about the travels of the Han dynasty envoy Zhang Qian to this area.  It seems that history does repeat itself.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:31 PM

Chinas president is trying to build a new silk road. This would secure Chinas energy supplies, boost trade and transport links and strengthen regional policy coordination from the Pacific to the Baltic Sea. 

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ANOTHER FACE: U.S. military stronghold keeping watch over the Pacific

ANOTHER FACE: U.S. military stronghold keeping watch over the Pacific | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Under the Obama administration, a strategic pivoting to Asia will see 60 percent of the U.S. Navy's fleet based in the Pacific Ocean by 2020. This has been described as a strategic "rebalance" to strengthen the U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

A change in the geopolitics of the Pacific Area.  With the growing of the Chinese Navy with their new aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, and the economic importance of the area, the US will ship 80% of the navy to Pacific waters.  Hawaii's importance as a military base has now increased, or at least returned to the same level as in WWII.  Showing a shift of importance away from the Atlantic waters and Europe.

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Japanese Minister Proposes More Active Military Presence in Region

Japanese Minister Proposes More Active Military Presence in Region | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Actions by China and North Korea are leading Japan to consider a more aggressive military posture after decades of postwar pacifism.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Given their geographic loaction, the geopolitcis of the area are going to force the Japanese to reverse its stance on the military since the end of World War II.  Some in the government want to change the post-war constitution and change the JSDF, Japanese Self-Defense Force, into a full military not just a self-defense force.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  With no saftey regulations to go by, nor any labor unions to file greviences for bad working conditions, and unsafe for that matter, its no wonder they can be on budget and of course this will give them a competitive edge.  If they can do it cheaper it will cost less than anyone else can do it for, and everyone knows governments will always go the cheapest route.  The labor cost is so much lower in China, think no safety regulaitons or government watchdog like OSHA, that it is cheaper to make it there and ship it across the globe.  They really have no regard for worker safety in any industry, this video just shows that even in construction, or destruction, there is no concern for the workers...interesting coming from a Communist country where the worker was supposed to be the most important person, over the capitalists.  Hmmm makes you think....

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:13 PM

This video is jaw-dropping proof of how China cuts corners in their quest for growing their economy. With such a large population looking for work China does not really need to protect their workers. I wonder if China will experience a labor movement similar to the one in the US that introduced protective legislation.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 9:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

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U.S. talking to Turkey about China missile deal concerns

U.S. talking to Turkey about China missile deal concerns | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
ANKARA (Reuters) - The United States is concerned Turkey's decision to build a missile defense system with a Chinese firm could undermine allied air defenses, its envoy said on Thursday, but dismissed...
Al Picozzi's insight:

With China also starting to reopen the silk road they are stepping into the Middle East and a key US and NATO ally.  The Chinese state this is just a commerical deal, with I think it really is trying to lay future groundwork.  The system that Turkey is getting will not be compatible with NATO's weapon systems, which has always been a big part and a requirement of the alliance.  Could this move be the first in Turkey leaving NATO, or even looking away to Europe and looking to China.  With Turkey still not being admitted int the EU they might be feeling they have to look elsewhere to help themselves grow...hmmm maybe the EU should look at their application again??

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 26, 2013 9:58 PM

The US is worried that Turkeys decision to buil a defense system with China would undermine air defenses. They are looking to strengthen their domestic defense industry from fear of overflow from the viloence in Syria. The US is upset becuase Turkeys new model would not be system compatible with the models of other members, that could lead to  a undermining ore principle of the 28-nation alliance;

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Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.

 

"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 9:46 PM

Tags: popular culture, South Korea, East AsiaChina, tourism.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:23 PM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

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China military urges vigilance over Japan's defense plan

China military urges vigilance over Japan's defense plan | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

China's response to the action that the Japanese might want to increase their military.  Interesting to see that China feels Japan should not be in fear of China's military, even though they just completed their first aircraft carrier.  They also refer to Japan's World War II past...is that fear really there, that Japan will do the same thing.  The Chinese also feel that Japan has not done enough to atone for their past action in China in WWII.  Intersting especially from a country with questionable human rights violations.

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The Growing Significance of the Ocean for China's Opening up - People's Daily Online

The Growing Significance of the Ocean for China's Opening up - People's Daily Online | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As a nation on its shift from an opening large country to a fully opening strong country,the ocean
Al Picozzi's insight:

A good article to read from China.  It shows how they see that their economic geography is connected to the ocean and their costal ports and cities.  To me this is a return to the past as this area, and China, controlled world trade in the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.  Is there going to be anther shift in control of trade back to the west?  If so, will it take 400 years?

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Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:17 PM

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.