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Rescooped by Al Picozzi from Geography Education
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Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  All links archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I really could see the idea of island biogeography when looking at islands and the ocean and how they species could develop that way.  Until I saw this video I do not think I could have made that cross over to continents.  Now I do see it.  If we build something across an open plain it will effect how species roam the area.  I remeber seeing pictures of the Alaskan pipeline raised in certain area and could not until now figure out why.  Now I know it was done, at least partly for, environmental reasons. So animals could still travel under it in order to move about.  If not Alaska would have been cut in half and prevented the animals form moving across the pipeline.  So as nature effected the developement of species with the rising and falling of ocean levels and islands, human effect the developmentof species with roads, farms and cities to name just a few.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:45 PM

It is fascinating to see how life evolves differently on isolated islands. The unique biomes often lack enough diversity to fill certain roles, so the animals move to fill them. For example, the komodo dragon was able to evolve to its large size because there was not large predator sitting on top of the food chain to prevent its growth. Sadly, the unique nature of island biogeography also makes it much more delicate, and species are much more likely to become extinct.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:35 PM

There are times where I wish certain species don't spread.  Other times I understand the migration and think it's great.  If humans died out then I believe all species would flourish just as Sir Ken Robinson says.  

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:06 PM
Island Biogeography is the theoretical explanations as to why species occurs, it also studies the species composition and species richness on an island.. it is not specific to land masses around water. Isolation gives species a strong place in their environment. The fact that new species and things show up are amazing, but sometimes new species are not properly adapted because there is no other general force against them and they do not ever learn to defend themselves.
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Shark Tracker

Shark Tracker | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2013 10:02 PM

This is a project sponsored by OCEARCH (Ocean Reseach) that helps to track the journeys of individual sharks to better understand their migratory patterns.  This data also helps to establish maps of the spatial extend of Shark habitat.  This is in essence another fantastic practical application of GPS technology.


Tags: biogeographymapping, GPS.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 16, 2013 11:51 PM
its just never safe to get back intot he water is it. guess Im just showing my age with that movie reference. Saw Jaws at the Route 44 Drive in the Rustic full the the metal speaker that hung on your window...so much fun
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Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It is not just human's that have to adapt to the environment.  As we have adapted to the wilderness that once existed, animals are now adapting to the new urban areas.  It is just amazing to see what these dogs can do,

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:51 PM

Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you notice that the commuters around you include a stray dog. Some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's complicated subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops. The human commuters around them are so accustomed to it that they rarely seem to notice. As many as 35,000 stray dogs live in Russia's capital city. They can be found everywhere, from markets to construction sites to underground passageways, scrounging for food and trying to survive. Using the subway is just one of many strategies that they use to survive. Living in the streets in tough and these dogs know this better than some humans. What is most impressive about their dogs is their ability to deal with the Metro's loud noises and packed crowds, distractions that domesticated dogs often cannot handle.

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Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future

Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
In Nepal, government owned forests are being felled at record speed, while community managed ones are thriving.

 

This is a great link for discussing governance and the environmental interactions and community.   


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This shows want can be done to help preserve some of the natural habitat that we all need to live.  While the government lands are being used, illegally, though the government does nothing to stop it becasue of the economic stimulus it provides the lands given too the commnity are surviving and actually striving.  So why can't something like this be done in the Brazilian rain forest.  Set some of it aside to the community so they can maintain it, let it grow so that one of the most important natural resoures on this planet just doesn'tend up as ashes.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:00 PM

The deforestation of Nepal to supply the growing needs of India is an example of how growth in one country strips another of its resources. While Nepal may gain in the short term form logging away their forests, deforestation has steep long term costs. Many people live off the forests and their disappearance could threaten to ruin their culture.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 23, 2014 1:05 PM

Rapid population growth and development in a country can lead to dangerous resource drains, both illegal and legal, in neighboring countries. India's growth demands more wood, and Nepal has been trying to supply their demand. In the last 20 years, 25% of Nepal's forests have been harvested for the logging industry. The demand for wood and rising prices has caused an illegal logging industry that threatens non-governmental forests. Luckily, in the 1980s, Nepal handed over 25% of the forests to communities, who have worked to preserve them.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:09 AM

This is really a sad thing to behold, these jungles which for many many years have provided resources to both wild life and resources for the people of Nepal. Unfortunately now partially because of globalization these jungles are far more valuable for their lumber than as living forests. The destruction of the environment such as this is a huge catastrophe for the world as a whole. Ideally the government or foreign powers will do something to prevent the entirety of the forests from being cut down.

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Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards

Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
On July 18, 2013, a fierce wildfire threatened Palm Springs, California.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 20, 2013 3:58 PM
Alot of fire going on out west. Check out the NASA site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/index.html that shows them from a satellite view of the various fires.
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 21, 2013 3:48 PM

I think this shows that the weather has entered into a world of extremes of very hot or very cold, wet or dry and not to much of regular seasonal changes of the past typical patterns.

It shows that with general warmer ocean temps, has lead to this new type of weather patterns resulting from global warming. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:20 PM
When we are liviing in a hot and dry climate we are bound to face more devastating fires accident made or not
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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Such an incredible sight to see.  The amount of bio-diversity located in the Great Barrier Reef is just astounding.  No wonder people feel this is an asset to keep.  Not only will it bring in toursim and the money that goes along with it, the toursim will help keep the area clean for the government will not want to lose the billions of dollars they earn from tourism.  Ecologically the preservation of this area will benefit not only the natural wildlife there, but it will benefit the people.  Even if it is a bit selfish to keep it preserved for monetary reasons, at least it is still being preserved.

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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:38 AM

This article reminds me of another video i've seen recently of a grouper fish swallowing a 4-foot black tip shark whole. A fisherman caught that on camera while trying to reel in the shark. Time and time again I'm reminded that not everything in nature is as it seems and that the unexpected should be expected. 

This makes me want to buy some scuba gear and take some diving classes, I ought to conquer my fear of sharks by safely observing them with a research team! 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:36 PM

Amazing photos, there are so many different kinds of life that exists in the Ocean. As the Great Barrier Reef falls victim to climate change and pollution, the number of species at risk is almost calculable. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:26 PM

Australia's marine life is amazing, being able to hide by blending in to their environment is a testament to the waters that Australia has. The diverse wildlife of Australia waters is shown to be an adaptive bunch and begs the question: How many more animals are out there that we do not know of?