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American Battle Monuments Commission

American Battle Monuments Commission | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is something, as Americans, we should all go and try and see in Europe.  I know this week is a tuday of the Euorpean region, but all of these cemeteries are in Europe.  I have see only one, the one in Italy and it is a breath taking site.  Just being there puts alot into perspective, of what the US stood for and of our soldiers who fought and died in other countries for the defense of others, not just ourselves.  When others criticize the US, and yes I know we don't always do the right thing, they should come and see these rows and rows of graves just to jog their memories a bit and maybe just maybe try to see things from our point of view.  As Americans we too should take a look to remeber what these men, boys really, did and to strive to live up to their sacrifice.

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Hundreds of Colorado flooding victims stranded, awaiting rescue

Hundreds of Colorado flooding victims stranded, awaiting rescue | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More heavy rain is expected today in Colorado where rescue workers are battling to reach hundred of residents cut off by the worst floods in decades, which have killed at least four people and left many still unaccounted for.
Al Picozzi's insight:

All of the rain in flooding happening here just reminds me of the floods we had in Cranston in 2010.  I know it is not on the same scale but it still reminds me off how much was lost in a small city in RI.  Also, all the forest fires this year in that region contributed to the flooding as there were alot fewer trees, as well as damaged soil, to absorb the water and rainfall. 

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing

Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
With the slight resurgence of U.S. manufacturing in the recent years—termed a potential "manufacturing moment" by some—it is important to consider not just the future of manufacturing in America but also its geography.

 

This interactive map is brimming with potential to both teach and learn about the changing industrial geographies of the United States.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that there still is manufacturing in the US given all the news about it moving to China and other countries.  As the map shows there still is big manufacturing in east of the Mississippi and then manily along the West Coast.  I really thing the US as a whole needs to get back to basics.  Manufacturing is what made this country strong, and I believe that a strong manufacturing sector with a strong services sector will help this country grow.

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The U.S. Plan to Invade Canada: War Plan Red

The U.S. Plan to Invade Canada: War Plan Red | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
A time-honored tradition in the U.S. military, contingency plans have been drawn up for the defense against, and invasion of, most major military powers. In fact, in response to recent events on the Korean peninsula, the U.S.
Al Picozzi's insight:

And you all thought that the US/Canadian border was going to be safe...well it is...now.  Seems that both sides made plans to invade each other in the 1920s.  Seems that there are contingency plans for everything.  With the relations that we see today, its had to believe that such plans are even necessary...however don't forgot your history.  The US was invaded from Canada by the British during the revolution and we also invaded Canada in both the Revoultion and the War of 1812.  Check out this little article for a brief War of 1812 history http://forgottenhistory.blogspot.com/2007/05/united-states-invades-canada.html ; So imagine now if we did not enjoy what is considered the longest undefended border on the planet??  What would life be like along an unfriendly border that stretches from the Atlantic to the Pacific and the long Alaskan/Canadian border??  Nice to live next to a counrty and not have the North Korea/Sout Korea mentality.

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Salton Trough

Salton Trough | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Along the border of Mexico and the U.S., a geologically and tectonically complex area serves as a visual reference point for astronauts on the International Space Station.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow, amazing picture.  Can see alot of features in the area.  Was surprised to see how the urban patter just continues right over the border especailly in the San Diego/Tijuana area and it alomost looks like Yuma just runs into Mexicali, and I believe Calexio, Cailf. is just north of Mexicali, Mexico.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:27 AM

What a great teaching image! Plate tectonics and rifting, agriculture, international borders, urbanization, dry climates, human and environmental interactions...the applications are endless. 

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Bizarre Borders


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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Geography of a Recession

Geography of a Recession | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Here is an animated view of the impact of the recession on the United States.  It's a fantastic geovisualization of a horrible economic reality. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

It makes you wonder about the recovery the government is also talking about.  Alot of the new jobs created are temporary, part-time and low wages.  What they also do not tell you is that the unemployment is going down because the government does count the people that are unemployed but have stopped looking from work.  Alot of these people are just tired of looking and have given up.  So if your not looking for work, but are unemployed, you are not counted as unemployed for the purpose of the unemployment number, interesting isnt't it??  What the map shows is that the upper mid-west and the central mid-west seem to be recession proof.   Is that because alot of this area are family farms or is it because these areas are low population and there is a shortage of people to work the available job?  Or are these states just better at running their government?

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Brandon Murphy's comment, August 7, 2012 11:48 PM
It's quite interesting to see the areas of which the local economies are supposedly starting to turn around and what the numbers actually show.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:45 PM

This interactive map offers a lot to read between the lines. Most interesting to me, the middle of the country seemed to be somewhat spared in comparison to the East and West coasts. Perhaps that is becuase the middle of the country has lower population than the coast and that the majority of the jobs held by people there are related to food production. The bread basket of America will never be relieved of demand for goods and that also means workers. Also super interesting- Washigton DC and the surrounding area reflected a somewhat better unemployment rate. Same with Vermont and New Hampshire- perhaps the population is more even with the labor demand than in extremely populated places that only have so many jobs.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:35 PM

(North America topic 10)
After viewing this animated map of unemployment rates over time, I'm surprised that it hasn't become more common. In fact, I don't think I've seen anything like this on any major news reports or websites. (I wonder why?) I was surprised to find out that many (though not all) Midwestern counties appear to have been just as adversely affected as more urbanized, coastal regions; although the Midwest's unemployment rate has overall been less than other regions', recently it has been so only by a narrowing margin.
I would make 2 suggestions if this map were to be remade or enhanced: First, I would add more recent data to show which regions are recovering (if at all) compared to others. Secondly, I would make additional brackets to represent rates in excess of 10%, since a large portion of counties have fallen into this top color level.