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Turkey's Marmaray project: An ambitious plan to link Europe and Asia

Turkey's Marmaray project: An ambitious plan to link Europe and Asia | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
As a country, Turkey is often described as a bridge between Europe and Asia. On Tuesday, for the first time, the two continents will be officially connected by a multi-billion dollar underwater railway tunnel.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Istanbul has also been said to be both a European and Middle East city, some of the city is on the European side of the Bospourous.  Turkey also has been historically seen as the bridge or link between Europe and the Middle East.  This project, like the Chunnel that connects the United Kingdom to France, and therefore mainland Europe, is going to make the city even more of the economic center of Turkey and help with the sever travel between the Middle East side and European side of Turkey.  I also wonder will the EU look at this an see this as a positive for Turkey and maybe help influnce their decision to let Turkey in the EU?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 29, 2013 6:42 PM

Turkey is not truly Middle Eastern nor European--it is that liminal in-between space.  Possibly this tunnel will strengthen Turkey's status of having one foot in Europe and one foot in the Near East.


Treathyl Fox's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:28 PM

Turkey described as a "bridge"?  Have often thought of it more like a "strategic safety pin".  But bridge is good!  Linking Europe and Asia?  It's an ambitious plan alright.  But I hope that it will be successful.  No doubt, Columbus, Marco Polo, and other explorers would have wanted it this way.  :)

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History of revolts and future geopolitics in the Middle East | Pakistan Tribune

History of revolts and future geopolitics in the Middle East | Pakistan Tribune | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Regularly, when spring comes, people expect flowers and green shoots and optimism prevails. Alas, things in the Middle East are quite different. With every
Al Picozzi's insight:

A view from Pakistan on the Arab sprink and the future on the Middle East.  A very interesting read. 

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U.S. talking to Turkey about China missile deal concerns

U.S. talking to Turkey about China missile deal concerns | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
ANKARA (Reuters) - The United States is concerned Turkey's decision to build a missile defense system with a Chinese firm could undermine allied air defenses, its envoy said on Thursday, but dismissed...
Al Picozzi's insight:

With China also starting to reopen the silk road they are stepping into the Middle East and a key US and NATO ally.  The Chinese state this is just a commerical deal, with I think it really is trying to lay future groundwork.  The system that Turkey is getting will not be compatible with NATO's weapon systems, which has always been a big part and a requirement of the alliance.  Could this move be the first in Turkey leaving NATO, or even looking away to Europe and looking to China.  With Turkey still not being admitted int the EU they might be feeling they have to look elsewhere to help themselves grow...hmmm maybe the EU should look at their application again??

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 26, 2013 9:58 PM

The US is worried that Turkeys decision to buil a defense system with China would undermine air defenses. They are looking to strengthen their domestic defense industry from fear of overflow from the viloence in Syria. The US is upset becuase Turkeys new model would not be system compatible with the models of other members, that could lead to  a undermining ore principle of the 28-nation alliance;

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Egypt's 1952 revolution and military rule, a history in photos

Egypt's 1952 revolution and military rule, a history in photos | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
On July 23, 1952 a group of Egyptian army "Free Officers" engineered a coup d'etat. Military leaders have kept a firm grasp on power ever since.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Also happened at the end of the Ottoman Empire, of which Egypt once belonged.  Mustafa Kemal with what was left of the Ottoman Military supported Turkish nationalsim and deposed the Sultan and gave birth to Modern Turkey.  So here is a question to ponder, is a military coup detat to change governamnets part of the culture in this area? If it is, does anyone have the right to interfere?

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