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Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas Headlines, News, The Philippine Star

Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas Headlines, News, The Philippine Star | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Japan announced that it will send 1,000 of its servicemen to join relief efforts for the victims of super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Visayas.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just something to show how the world is responding and how times have changed.  The last time the Japanese military came to the Philippines was as invaders in 1941and left with MacArthur's return in 1944.  Ironic that the Typhoon hit the area close by Red Beach where MacArthur came ashore to fullfill his "I shall return" promise.  This just shows how times have changed and former enemies can come together in a time of need.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 16, 2013 5:27 PM

Japan is going to send 1,000 troops to the philippines to help bring relief along with numerous amounts of supplies. It just shows how much the world can come together to help one country during a great time in need. 

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The devestation is just incredible and almost unbelievable.  It really shows just how we are at the mercy of nature no matter how we try to change our environment.  The technology is also incredible.  Not 10 years ago what we see now instantly would have taken alot longer.  This can also help the international rescue effort in going to where they are needed the most.  Having this information is priceless.

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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:35 PM
Looking upfront at the before and after the typhoon hit the Philipines right on the coast line. The coast was completly wiped out and destructed it looked as though nothing was ever there. Not only were homes and businesses destructed but over 2500 people were killed in this natural disaster.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 7:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I mentioned this before in a previous scoop that just the location and the grographical make up of the Philippines is going to make this effort hard.  Not is this area made up of thousand of islands, but it is over 5300 miles from Hawaii, the main US Naval Base in the Pacific.  It is going to take time just to get there and time is not a something that can be wasted.  Once there to get the aid to where it is need they I think wil have to do like a military combat hosbital..triage.  Who needs the help first and most and the others will have to wait.  It will be impossible to help them all at the same time..the US and the world will try, its just not going to happen quickly.  Just look at how long it took New Orleans to get the full aid, and that was located literally in the US's own back yard!!!!

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 7:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 7:37 PM

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Just the remoteness of the area is going to hinder the relief efforts.  Even though the supplies are getting through it is getting through to the areas that need it the most is the problem.  When the infrastructure is not that good to begin with, the damage done by this kind of disaster is multiplied.  Look at New Orleans when Katrina hit.  It still took days for relief and just water to get where it was needed.  Imagine what that would have been like if the infrastructure was like like that of the Philippines.  The country is overwhelmed by this disaster and needs the help.  Its getting it but the problem still exists of how to distrbute it now that it is there.  Makes you wonder if Subic Bay was still open as a US military base if it would have made it easier.  Sometimes having a military base is not a bad thing.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 5:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.