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Hundreds of Colorado flooding victims stranded, awaiting rescue

Hundreds of Colorado flooding victims stranded, awaiting rescue | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More heavy rain is expected today in Colorado where rescue workers are battling to reach hundred of residents cut off by the worst floods in decades, which have killed at least four people and left many still unaccounted for.
Al Picozzi's insight:

All of the rain in flooding happening here just reminds me of the floods we had in Cranston in 2010.  I know it is not on the same scale but it still reminds me off how much was lost in a small city in RI.  Also, all the forest fires this year in that region contributed to the flooding as there were alot fewer trees, as well as damaged soil, to absorb the water and rainfall. 

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Love these maps.  Bubbler is so right in RI and I never knew it was called that anywhere else.  However I think they got the one about the subs wrong.  I still call those sandwhiches a grinder.  I went to Texas once and ask for a grinder and I still think the guy there is laughing at me to this day.  Its really is great to see the difference though even though this is one country with many different backgrounds.

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François B.'s comment, June 7, 2013 5:58 AM
Highly recommanded!! A must-read!
MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 7:50 AM
Excellent
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 1:29 PM

These 22 maps are a great representation of how linguistically different the United States truly is. Depending  where you are from I the US shows how you say something differently. For example, in the Northeast and South, people pronounce the word caramel in two words, "cara and mel" and in the west and west coast it is pronounced " car-mel". Even the word crayon is pronounced differently depending where you live. 

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | News | National Post

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | News | National Post | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

 

Globalization has changed North American ethnic patterns as fewer European immigrants are migrating to Canada, and more are coming for Asia.  Not surprisingly, the urban areas are the regions were this pattern is most pronounced. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is what is happening in the U.S. also.  As globalization continues more immigrants from non-European countries are heading to the US.  The old ethic neighboors, the little Italy for example, are still there but there are not many Italians left.  Most left the inner cities for the suburbs, much like in Canada.  Amazing to see similar patterns in different countries.

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 6:45 PM
Asians have been affiliated with Canada for many years. Many immigrant workers in the 1800s helped Canade build their railroads. Many Vietnamese refugees escaped to Canada during the Vietnam war. Today Asians are still migrating to Canada forming a multi-cultural society. In the 90s most immigrants were able to get cheap land, but now modern prices have inflated.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 10:39 AM

The idea of ethnic enclaves themselves have an interesting commentary of sorts on the current political climate. It's been said time and time again in recent years that diversity is to be celebrated and encouraged, but we can see very clearly that some people do not wish to live in diverse neighborhoods and would rather live with people very similar to themselves. Even the capital of Rhode Island, Providence, is segregated in this sort of way.

 

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Bizarre Borders


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 4:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 4:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 6:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

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Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing

Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
With the slight resurgence of U.S. manufacturing in the recent years—termed a potential "manufacturing moment" by some—it is important to consider not just the future of manufacturing in America but also its geography.

 

This interactive map is brimming with potential to both teach and learn about the changing industrial geographies of the United States.


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that there still is manufacturing in the US given all the news about it moving to China and other countries.  As the map shows there still is big manufacturing in east of the Mississippi and then manily along the West Coast.  I really thing the US as a whole needs to get back to basics.  Manufacturing is what made this country strong, and I believe that a strong manufacturing sector with a strong services sector will help this country grow.

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is change is the immigration from Mexico will also change the deographics of the area into which they are moving.  Higher incomes, more businesses, more employment in that area that will hopefully spread to other areas.  This is an unforseen result of the drug wars and although it is a positive result, the violence will need to stop.  As it improves the economic situation in the US it worses in the area of Mexico where these type of people are needed.  Legitimate businesses are leaving Mexico leaving a vacume that is going to be filled by the cartels, which will make the problems grow.  While this is a postive for the US in the areas where they are moving to, it is also a negative for Mexico and in the long run a negative for the US.

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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 21, 2012 12:27 PM
This story reminds me of the Dutch Africans who moved from their settlements and went futher into the country to avoid British colonalism. Although far apart and not the same conditions i found the migration of the people to be similar in comparison with the affulnt Mexicans that are afriad for their safety. The people are so afriad for their lives that there willing to leave everything and move just to preserve there life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. I have no problem with this group of people migrating to the U.S because if they stay the powerful drug cartel will harress them and kill them.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 12:02 PM

This article is about a recent rise in affluent Mexicans immigrating to the United States to escape the drug war violence in Mexico. These wealthy Mexican immigrants are in stark contrast to the stereotype of the poor illegal-boarder-crossing Mexican immigrant. They come to the United States and live in expensive homes, drive fancy cars, and invest in business. While these immigrants are a boon to the United States economy, Mexico is losing some of the most important citizens; the ones with the wealth to create jobs.

 

The article highlights just how damaging the drug cartels are to Mexico's future.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 10:22 AM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years,