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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Looks like time are changing.  As Mexico becomes more business friendly and with cheap labor and less government regulations more and more people, as well as businesses are going to go there.  NAFTA only increases this more.  Mexico is in the perfect position literally. Right next to the United States and closer to Europe than China dramatically lowers transportation costs, which in turn leads to greater profits for the company.  This will eventually lead to more jobs and great opportunity in Mexico, both for Mexicans and people immegrating into Mexico.  As NAFTA takes hold and the economy so sluggish in the US, rising costs in China, and with the EU have economic crisis after economic crisis, it seems for the the time the Mexico is the place where you want to do business.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:43 AM

The wealth of a nation can come from many differnet aspects, jobs land, ecnomy, resoucres, and labor force. In many contries like china and indina they have lots of factorys and factory workers. However what ahppens when the cost of living and transporations go up, should we give workers a pay raise? NO. The answer is to find people who are able to work for cheeper. This lead to the mass influx of mexican factorites and the mass influx of forign workers fleeing to mexico for the jobs and simple life.

It was very interesting to see how even workers form the US were going to mexico in search of jobs becuse ten years ago it was the exact oppisit.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 12:44 PM

As domestic problems increase in countries where the United States have been previously "setting up shop", institutions are rethinking where they outsource manufacturing to.  It is becoming increasingly more expensive to ship goods from China or Europe.  People of all sorts are turning to Mexico, where the United States already has a good manufacturing foundation, to find new opportunities in many different increasingly competitive (globally) sectors.  This is allowing Mexico to be culturally, economically, and socially closer than ever before to many countries around the world.  This large influx of people from all around the world is definitely welcomed, but is being monitored and managed with great care and strategy in order to ensure that this shift benefits everyone.  Mexico is currently very flexible since it is transitioning into a more first-world country; this gives entrepreneurs a great place to start experimenting and migrants a chance to shape Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 7:39 AM

Foreigners on work visas is a huge and broadening event that is happening throughout the world. Most of the people on work visas have migrated from the U.S. and more now than ever, Europe. With dwelling economies, people are being forced to migrate towards the U.S. and Mexico.

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Mexican army searches for bodies in flood and landslide-hit La Pintada

Mexican army searches for bodies in flood and landslide-hit La Pintada | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Sixty-eight people missing in village devastated by storms Manuel and Ingrid as government says 200 could be dead
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that the US is not the only place at this time to have disasters from large amounts of rainfall.  The people of this area describe a rainfall that was very similar to the description of the people of the Denver/Bolder area in Colorado.  What makes it worse in this area is the remote area of some of the villages.  Whereas the damage in Colorado was in the cities and the main road, more outliying areas in Mexico were hit hard.  The Mexican Army is trying its best to reach these areas.  On the similar side Acapulco was also hit hard and suffered major flooding from Hurricane Irene and another storm that hit soon after.  Much like Bolder and other Colorado cities it suffered major fllod damages and much like Route 34 in Colorado the highway connecting Acapulco to the rest of Mexico was wiped out.  To underscore this the people are upset with the response of the Mexican government.  With accusations ranging from corruption to downright neglect the people believe the government is at part to blame.  The article states they are going to move the town pictured over to a safer location...I wonder what that move is going to look like....

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:59 AM

La Pintada was the area of the greatest tragedy in the wake of the two storms Maunel and Ingrid. There rainfall was very similar to that of the of the areas hit hardest in Colorado. We often forget that the US is not the only place that can experience weather and devestation like this. 

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The drug wars are still around, but as the artical states it is being done is less public ways and in remote areas.  The drug lords will not push to much for if they do they will bring more of the military on them, not just the local police which really could not stop them.  Also the more publilc it is the more the US would want to get involved to try to stem the problem.  The will continue to lay low as this type of story dies down and the US focuses on something else, like Syria at the moment.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 9:13 AM

As military and government officials stepped in to control the drug wars, cartels have made greater efforts to quiet their attacks. Although the attacks are quieter, they are still happening at constant rates. As cartels clash into eachother, more problems arrive and once again question the legalization of marijuana.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:28 AM

This article talks about the realization of the Mexician drug war and the way that these riots have affected Mexican land overall. For example the statistics of the violence against the Mexican military army for 2011-2012 is alarming; there has been 503 Attacks, 181 Injjuries and, 31 deaths of the people who are sworn to protect the citizens.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 12:02 PM

The new president of Mexico, Enrique Pena Nieto, has been trying to make the Cartel and governments fighting less apparent.  In a war, each side has to learn how to play the other's game, which is what is happening here.  Perhaps the Cartel is going along with this so they can "test the waters" of this new president and his very different policies (compared to Felipe Calderon).  Nieto wants to focus less on the drug wars, so the Cartel is laying low in northern rural areas, so they can still smuggle drugs into and guns out of the United States.

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Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help

Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
From San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., requests for assistance have become a drain on the resources of fire departments in cities on the United States border with Mexico.

 

This is a poignant example of how site and situation impact the local geographic factors. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

These border towns should be getting some help from the federal government.  They handle ther calls of all the border medical emergencies from immigrants, both legal and illegal, and from people who left the US to live better in Mexico, but return to the US for medical care and suffer an "event" at the border to get to the hospital faster.  It also hurts the towns own citizens as sometimes these small towns only have one emergency vechile to do all the calls.  Maybe they should be given a grant to expand their emergency services since alot of the calls they take are from a federal source, ie border control.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:05 AM

This is one factor I never thought about before reading the article. Borders are one of the defining concepts of what constitutes a nation, and yet in emergencies these boundaries can become much more fluid. Of course borders in the first place are a human creation, but I imagine that along any border in the world, someone in dire need would want to get to the closest hospital, even if they're crossing a border to do so. At this point the idea of the authority implicated alongside borders might begin to seem less important. Though this makes me wonder if there are some locations which have international treaties so that local foreign departments may cross the border to help.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 1:43 PM

Medical expenses are a burden on millions of people each and every year. With conditions like this on the border there is no wonder why the Calimex fire department and responders needed funds. They also need to do something about the conditions on the California/Mexican border.

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is change is the immigration from Mexico will also change the deographics of the area into which they are moving.  Higher incomes, more businesses, more employment in that area that will hopefully spread to other areas.  This is an unforseen result of the drug wars and although it is a positive result, the violence will need to stop.  As it improves the economic situation in the US it worses in the area of Mexico where these type of people are needed.  Legitimate businesses are leaving Mexico leaving a vacume that is going to be filled by the cartels, which will make the problems grow.  While this is a postive for the US in the areas where they are moving to, it is also a negative for Mexico and in the long run a negative for the US.

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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 21, 2012 12:27 PM
This story reminds me of the Dutch Africans who moved from their settlements and went futher into the country to avoid British colonalism. Although far apart and not the same conditions i found the migration of the people to be similar in comparison with the affulnt Mexicans that are afriad for their safety. The people are so afriad for their lives that there willing to leave everything and move just to preserve there life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. I have no problem with this group of people migrating to the U.S because if they stay the powerful drug cartel will harress them and kill them.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 12:02 PM

This article is about a recent rise in affluent Mexicans immigrating to the United States to escape the drug war violence in Mexico. These wealthy Mexican immigrants are in stark contrast to the stereotype of the poor illegal-boarder-crossing Mexican immigrant. They come to the United States and live in expensive homes, drive fancy cars, and invest in business. While these immigrants are a boon to the United States economy, Mexico is losing some of the most important citizens; the ones with the wealth to create jobs.

 

The article highlights just how damaging the drug cartels are to Mexico's future.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 10:22 AM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

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‘The Bridge’ Series Premiere Review

‘The Bridge’ Series Premiere Review | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
FX's new series, 'The Bridge,' brings two wildly different detectives together in a bizarre murder mystery that also focuses on political tensions along the U.S.-Mexico border.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Why this in a geography type class..well this good show is set in a real location, The Bridge of the Americas that links El Paso, Texas to the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez.  It shows, although with some dramatic license, what can go on in this very charged area of the US and Mexico.  Juarez is called the murder captial of the world, why??  This is one of the major drug routes of the drug trade into the US...and of illegal arms in Mexico.  This show tracks a serial killer, but it shows how the officals have to work together across international borders.

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Salton Trough

Salton Trough | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Along the border of Mexico and the U.S., a geologically and tectonically complex area serves as a visual reference point for astronauts on the International Space Station.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow, amazing picture.  Can see alot of features in the area.  Was surprised to see how the urban patter just continues right over the border especailly in the San Diego/Tijuana area and it alomost looks like Yuma just runs into Mexicali, and I believe Calexio, Cailf. is just north of Mexicali, Mexico.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 3, 2013 10:27 PM

What a great teaching image! Plate tectonics and rifting, agriculture, international borders, urbanization, dry climates, human and environmental interactions...the applications are endless. 

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 7:37 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 3:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

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Lax U.S. gun laws enable killing in Mexico

Lax U.S. gun laws enable killing in Mexico | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
U.S. needs to help end the violence....

 

When I say "illegal goods trafficked across the U.S.-Mexico border," most of us immediately think about narcotics from Mexico coming into the United States.  However, the border is more complicated than that--the violence on the border isn't only a problem with Mexican governance, but many of the deaths are directly attributable to guns coming form the United States.  This is an op-ed piece arguing the the United States' gun laws are a part of the ongoing problems along the border.   


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Illegal trade runs in both direction, drugs from Mexico north and guns and ammo south from the US.  Some of the trade was a badly handled "sting operation" to trace where the gun eventually went, but the government lost track of where they went and were not able to find the bigger bosses in the cartels.  Compared to gun laws in Mexico, yes ours are lax, however I think to state them as lax or weak in general might be an overstatement.  Some countries are even more strict, like Great Britian and there are some areas of the world where a child can buy an AK-47 off the street in broad daylight.  It is all taken in contex. 

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Another showing that the trend of illegal immigration is on the decline, even as Congress still is looking for ways to pass an immigration reform bill.  With the US economic problems, post 9/11 tightening of the US border and new labor laws whcih make it difficult to hire people who are considered illegal, plus other factors have led to less and less Mexicans coming to the US.  With NAFTA finally beginning to have a postivie effect in Mexico, more foregin companies are investing in Mexico with its low labor and low transportation costs to the US.  This leads to better and more jobs in Mexico and an economic boom, which it turn allows for better education for Mexican citizens at home.  People from the US are following some of these jobs and they are heading into Mexico as a change in pace from the other way around. 

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Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 11:28 AM
I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 10:14 AM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.