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Moscow tries to calm tensions after anti-migrant riot

Moscow tries to calm tensions after anti-migrant riot | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that Russia is not exempt from the anti-immigrant feelings that ares preading in Europe.  As the population declines more and more immigrants are entering European countries and Russia in order ti fill the job that have been left open by workers shortages.  The protests seem to be against the illigal immigration of Muslims into Russia.

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American Battle Monuments Commission

American Battle Monuments Commission | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is something, as Americans, we should all go and try and see in Europe.  I know this week is a tuday of the Euorpean region, but all of these cemeteries are in Europe.  I have see only one, the one in Italy and it is a breath taking site.  Just being there puts alot into perspective, of what the US stood for and of our soldiers who fought and died in other countries for the defense of others, not just ourselves.  When others criticize the US, and yes I know we don't always do the right thing, they should come and see these rows and rows of graves just to jog their memories a bit and maybe just maybe try to see things from our point of view.  As Americans we too should take a look to remeber what these men, boys really, did and to strive to live up to their sacrifice.

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Ukraine: West or east?

Ukraine: West or east? | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
ITS very name means “borderland”. Ukraine has long been on the edge between east and west. Now this country of 46m people is poised to tilt westward by signing...

Via Paige McClatchy
Al Picozzi's insight:

Going to be an intersting situation.  Aside from the issues with Russia, will the Ukraine be willing to lose some autonomy and follow the rules, especailly the human rights rules, of the EU.  How much are they willing to give up to be free from Russian influence?  Will they be willing to what some might say is trading one master, Russia, for another, the EU?  What will be the Russian reaction to this, especailly with all the gas they receive from Russia?  Goingt o be an intersting situation soon in this area of the world.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:00 PM

The Ukraine is currently stuck in a tug-of-war between the EU and a Russian contrived Central Asian trade agreement. The Economist believes that, thanks to Putin's bullying, the Ukraine will land in the EU's lap. This softpower fight between East and West is a remnant of the Cold War. 

Al Picozzi's comment, October 9, 2013 4:31 PM
Going to be an interesting situation. Russian with its long control of this area historically, from about the mid 17th century until its independence in 1991. Is it Russian fears of the "West" being so close to its border, remeber it was invaded many times from the west, Napoleon, Germany twice, from other western countries during the Russian civil war, including the US? or is it pure ecomonic to compete with the EU or just to deny the EU another member? Another Cold War coming, this one not involving the US?
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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon, Joe Andrade
Al Picozzi's insight:

Incredible to see this kind of work.  I really hope this helps people remember what happened and what was given up in World War II.  As we lost more vets every day, we really need to make sure their scarifice is not forgotten.  Incredible piece of work here.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:54 AM
I found this article really interesting for a few different reasons. As a history major, the article provided a lot of information that I thought was interesting and of which I was unaware. It’s important to understand the reasons for the breakup and/or formation of countries when studying history. Part of understanding that is recognizing and analyzing the geographic implications of these changes.
Perhaps most importantly, the disappearance of countries would certainly have severe economic repercussions. The complete absence of an economy that had been around for decades, or the emergence of several new economies all at once would have serious effects on the interaction between neighboring countries and the global economy. Cultural unity and tension also plays a large role in the disappearance of countries. Examining patterns of cultural dissimilarity and hostility explains the breakup of these countries and makes for nations that possess a great deal of cultural homogeneity and a palette of cultural diversity in a small geographic area.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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The Greek island of old age

The Greek island of old age | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The inhabitants of a small Greek island live on average 10 years longer than the rest of western Europe. So what's the secret to long life in Ikaria?

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

I think sometimes it is best to look to the past so that we might have a better future.  A return to a simpler time, less stress, less to worry about.  Even in the technology age of iphones, and tablets and the aways staying connected we need to go back to where we are not connected.  I've seen to many people on "vacation" doing work whiel with their families..how is that healthy??  We need to slow down a bit, take it easy now and then and just unplug!

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:09 PM

According to this article, The people of the small Greek Island of Ikaria have a life expectancy that is 10 years longer than any other part of the world. It is attributed  to the nutritious diet that the citizens have and the lack of influence that the outside world has on other places. With less environmental factors to harm it, Ikaria is one of the most geographically advantageous places to live a healthy life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 11:07 AM

Scientists are always coming across new evidence proving that specific lifestyles, foods, and activities are what allow some to live longer than others, but maybe we need to look at life length at a geographic level. These places where people live longer, healthier lives must have some common threads linking them. It could be similar cultural constructs that are endemic to these places, promoting healthy habits, a sense of community, and overall peaceful lifestyles. 

 

Oddly enough, most of his daily routines, such as drinking tea, using local honey, drinking wine, and leading an active lifestyle, are touted by different scientists and salespeople as to keys to longevity. I think, that these routines combined with a great sense of community, lack of stress, and happiness lead to long life. The community on this island is very close knit, and many people live happily. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 2015 11:06 AM

I really believe that the clean air of this island could have something to do with the life expectancy being higher.  The less toxins you breathe in the less of a chance you will have to developing cancers and other diseases.  

 

Now as to how this gentleman defeated lung cancer after moving from the U.S. to Ikaria is a whole other story.  Maybe the wine did help.  Maybe leaving a dirty and toxin-ridden environment helped kill the cancer.  Bare minimum, this article definitely shines the light on the air-quality in certain parts of the world.

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

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chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 4:43 PM
Very clarifying information.......narrator really speaks quickly, like he just drank 5 pots of coffee and has to catch a plane or something...The You Tube Video 'Coffee The Greatest Addiction Ever' pops up next to his video
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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NYTimes-No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

NYTimes-No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


Via Kevin Suess, Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing to see that the birth rates are so low in Europe.  When at one time there were soo many people that many of them were part of the huge immigration to the US in the 19th and early 20th century.  Now some of these nations are having worker shortages as their populations get older.  The result of this is workers from other countries moving into European countries to work and fill the jobs.  This in turn has led to racial tensions in some European countires where people are stating that the jobs are being taken by these foregin workers.  However, it is the people of these countries that have having fewer children, whether it be a lifestyle choice or just plain economic factors.  It becomes a circular argument eventaully.  Will there be a change in the birth rate in Europe?  Only time will tell, but by the looks of itm it is not going to be anytime soon.  

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:11 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:06 AM

11 billion people projection for the future but a decline in population in Europe? How? What factors altered this? Why? 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:36 PM

This article discusses the population decrease in Southern Italy. The small city called Laviano is now deserted because of the extremely low birth rate. Rocco Falivena, the major, says that he proposed a system to get women to produce more babies. Pregnant women will receive 10,000 euros over the years if they produce a baby. Even with this system the population remains to be decreasing. 


The dramatic decrease of this small city will have huge economic consequences. This city is an example of the opposite that is happening globally and proves that the world needs a stable population and not a population decline. 

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Russia’s DNA: “Fear of Invasion”

Russia’s DNA: “Fear of Invasion” | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Al Picozzi's insight:

This is just a small article that explains a Russian "DNA" and the fear of invasions, especailly from the "west".  Who could blame them, Poland, Sweden, Germany in WW I, then many western countries during the Russian civil war and Germany again in WW II.  Fast forward to todays geographic and political outlook from Russian eyes, NATO more on their border with Poland, Latvia, Estonia and Lituania all members and with the growing of the EU economically, this fear within the "DNA" of Russia may not be hard to explain.  History will always shape how people feel and what they believe.

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Scottish independence: ‘Finance industry would leave’

Scottish independence: ‘Finance industry would leave’ | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
ThE financial services industry north of the Border would relocate to England if Scotland votes for independence next year, a senior Conservative has warned at the party conference.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Thie vote could be a major blow to the economy of Scotland.  If the finance industry does leave to England this could leave a new nation very vunerable economically.  Will they be admitted to the EU if there is no finacne industry in the country?  Will other countried recognize Scotland as an independant nation?  What of defense?  Most of the military belongs to Great Britian, will they all leave?  will they stay?  Will Scotland even be allowed to leave, vote of no vote?  Devolution forces are in Scotland, especially historical.  The people might vote for independence, but in this day and age, it is something that must not be taken lightly.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 12, 2013 9:45 PM

This could be a masive blow to Scotlands economy. A buisness minister has warned that the uncertanity of independance could cause companies like the royal bank of scotland to leave the third biggest center for financial services. 

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Georgian PM Meets Rasmussen, Discusses NATO And Russia

Georgian PM Meets Rasmussen, Discusses NATO And Russia | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Georgian Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili says his country will continue on its course of "joining NATO as soon as possible."

Following talks in Tbilisi with visiting NATO Secretar...
Al Picozzi's insight:

So the main question here is, will Russia allow Georgia, which it fought a short five day war in 2008, to join NATO? With this country right against the border of Russia, will they feel even more surrounded?  Estonia, Latvia and Lituania have joined NATO and there are talks also with the Ukraine about membership.  Will Russia allow it? Do they have a choice?  They went to war once with Georgia, why not again?

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Rising Anti-Immigration Sentiment in the EU

Stratfor Europe Analyst Adriano Bosoni discusses the political implications of the increasing number of migrants from the European Union's periphery to its c...

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

This looks just like the arguments in the US about the immigration issue here.  These seem to be be more of legal immigration, as well as illegal to some extent,  as to illegal immigration in the US.  The governments of some of the EU nations need this population in order to fill the workers shortage that has been fuled by low birth rates.  In the US its a little deffernt form of immigration.  Here many illegal immigrants are taking the much lower wage jobs and working in cash with no taxes, ie mirgrant farmers.  Well we want cheap food, that is the way the farm owners are doing it.  In Europe it seems that they are taking some jobs, but I assune since it is legal immigration they are paying some sort of tax on their wages.  These immigrants are from other EU countries for the most part.  Under the EU treaty it is legal for them to live and work in any member nation.  This shows the problem with supranational organizations, a country will lose some of its autonomy in these types of organizations.  For example, can the UK limit the number of people allowed into its country, or even limit access to their health care system under EU law?  If they do, what can the EU do to the UK?  Looks like a fight is about to start!

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:05 PM

Western Europe is facing the troubles of immigration for jobs. Countries in Europe, such as Eastern countries of Bulgaria and the P.I.G.S. are moving to core countries in search of work that the cannot find in their own land. The problem becomes a matter of the core country citizens not having jobs for themselves as their economy joins other in slowing down. Racial tensions are rising because of this. The video generalizes the anti-immigration as just anti-immigrants but as images in the video would suggest, much of the resentment is  towards Muslim immigrants.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:42 PM

this is hardly surprising that anti-immigrant sentiment has risen to this level. with no go zones in most major European cities it is unsurprising that people are trying to push back. considering that there are areas in Britain with sharia law, it's hardly surprising.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:58 PM

whenever you think about people rejecting immigration and illigal immigration being a problem you think about the united states but it is a problem all over the world. it does effect demographics of countries and places need to figure out how to balance helping others by letting them come to your country without it negatively effecting the well being of you own citizens in regards to jobs.

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Iconic Landscapes

Iconic Landscapes | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Time lapse video compilation Civilization: Part I - Europe by professional photographer Dominic Boudreault. Shot in England, France, Spain and Italy.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

An amazing view of some of the cities of Europe.  As a person who loves history to see these modern cities built around the old civiliztions of Europe is amazing.  For me it is Rome.  To see the runis of the Roman Forum and the Colosseum in the modern Rome is just amazing.  Even more amazing is how some of the buildings built by the Romans are still standing, and in use, when modern techniques do not seem to last long at all.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:11 PM

Europe is such a beautiful place where its landscapes, architecture, and waterways have shaped its future. This video shows the beauty of the towns and how everything in is has remembrances of the past. This video is a definite must see!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:33 AM

I found this very stirring.  To see the old and new buildings side by side makes one think about what came before and how the past influences the future.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 6:03 PM

This video of iconic landscapes displays beautiful and historic architecture throughout Europe. This video allows the viewer to see these great areas of Europe. I have a great deal of respect for those who built things such as the Colosseum in Rome years ago, as it is amazing that some of these historic buildings are still standing today. 

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Eurozone unemployment hits record high

Eurozone unemployment hits record high | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
The 17-nation bloc had a jobless rate of 11.6 per cent in September, while inflation eased slightly in the last month.

 

Although some countries in the Eurozone have lower unemployment rates like Austria (4.4%) and Germany (5.4%), more are in the worst collective tailspin since the creation of the common currency.  Spain has the worst unemplyment rate at 25.8% of the adult population out of work.  It has taken a nasty cultural and political turn as resentments and frustrations are boiling over in the Eurozone.  Some are derisively referring to the struggling southern European countries as P.I.G.S. (Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain). 

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic. 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

A big problem in the EU.  There are countries feeling the pinch becasue of the problems of other countries.  They feel why do we have to foot the bill of so many other countries that are just failing in their own economies through their own fault.  Sounds about the same as in the US when people say why do I have to pay for others mistakes and pay more in taxes.  One is on a macro scale, one is on a micro scale. 

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 7:48 PM

This article was interesting because unemployment is such a big topic discussed with many people today. Unemployment in the Eurozone has reached an all time high in September as their economy is falling into a recession. The highest rate was recorded in Spain where 25.8 adults are unemployed. Further layoffs are going to occur as their budget programs begin to kick in. Austria, the Netherlands, and Germany have the lowest recorded rates.

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NYTimes video: Turkey's E.U. application

NYTimes video: Turkey's E.U. application | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
David Cameron, the British prime minister, pledged full support for Turkish membership to the European Union during a visit to Ankara.

 

Turkey's application to the European Union challenges the very definition of "Europe" as various constituencies disagree on whether Turkey should be admitted in the E.U. or not. 

 

 


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Could this be just a matter of what it means to be European and that some Europeans feel that Turkey just doesn't fit??  Turkey has long been an ally of the West since its admission in NATO.  It fact along with the US, UK and Greece it sent major forces to Korea during the Korean War.  It helped stop the USSR from spreading, during the cold war, when it joined NATO and toady it has the second largest standing army in NATO, behind the US.   It has also been a help to the US and Europe in conflicts in Iraq and Afganistan.  To be part of the European Union only makes logical sense and economic sense.  Access to Asian markets given its geographical location and just the opening of the Turkish domestic markets to free trade.  Seems that old prejudices of what it means to be European is rearing its ugly head..last time this prejudice gained momentum of what it means to be something in Europe...Hitler!

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 22, 2012 12:27 PM
I already knew Turkey was in the discussion for joining the EU. There are many countries that want them to join, but there are also a few countries that don't want them in for some reason. I say let them join, Turkey isn't a bad country and by joining it would benefit both Turkey and the EU by making them stronger.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:58 PM
Turkey has made changes that should make her more attractive to the European Union. Turkey has done away with the death penalty and is more generous with women's rights. While it is not geographically in Europe, its location is profitable for commerce etc.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:47 AM

Turkey wanting to join the EU will change political geography drastically. Turkey would provide the EU with a border town with the middle east as well as add power and span of the European Union. With some countries like Greece showing that EU economies are dependent on one another and I'm not sure that makes Turkey an attractive or unattractive prospect.