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Caroline Kennedy takes public office in Japan, 50 years after JFK's death

Caroline Kennedy takes public office in Japan, 50 years after JFK's death | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
TOKYO - Caroline Kennedy, daughter of slain U.S. President John F. Kennedy, arrived in Japan on Friday to take up her first high profile job in public office, making a late start to a political career for which her family is renowned.
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems the Kennedy name, along with supporting the President, still has some pull in getting appointments.  I know that many Ambassador posts are given to supporters of the President as a reward, and many of them do not have any experience in foregin affairs.  However they are usually nominated, or let alone approved,  to posts in countries that are not seen as crucial in the US foregin policy, like Amabassador to San Marino, that small independant country in the middle of Italy, and not to a strategic ally in East Asia.  With no foregin policy experience except for being the daughter of JFK, is she really qualified for this diplomatic post?  Should this post have gone to a more experiened diplomat?  How about starting out your diplomatic career in a country that is not so crucial to US interests and working your way up to a post like Japan?  Well only time will tell if this post was a good idea.

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Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.

 

"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 9:46 PM

Tags: popular culture, South Korea, East AsiaChina, tourism.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:23 PM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:22 PM

I am amazed that the Chinese look up to anyone about anything.  They always seem to think that they reign supreme in just about everything and that they are the center of the universe.  To hear people say that they look up to South Korea for fasion and beauty is astounding.  China has the best of both worlds when it comes to history and modernity, and there are so many vibrant up and coming areas of China that it is shocking to see them look up to another country.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Wow.  With no saftey regulations to go by, nor any labor unions to file greviences for bad working conditions, and unsafe for that matter, its no wonder they can be on budget and of course this will give them a competitive edge.  If they can do it cheaper it will cost less than anyone else can do it for, and everyone knows governments will always go the cheapest route.  The labor cost is so much lower in China, think no safety regulaitons or government watchdog like OSHA, that it is cheaper to make it there and ship it across the globe.  They really have no regard for worker safety in any industry, this video just shows that even in construction, or destruction, there is no concern for the workers...interesting coming from a Communist country where the worker was supposed to be the most important person, over the capitalists.  Hmmm makes you think....

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:45 PM

China has one of the strongest economies in the world. However, I think sometimes, China takes that for granted. They think that just because they have a strong economy, they don't have to worry about safe working environments and they have nothing to lose if something happens to someone. As much as I'm sure China gives good paychecks to manufactured workers because of its wealth, there are some jobs, such as this one, that they think they don't have to pay enough. However at the same time, it's not China's fault. Sometimes, it's the workers faults for not using common sense while working, I'm a firm believer in "work smarter, not harder."

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:32 PM

Well nobody ever accused China of being a Union favoring country.  These people are risking their lives because its their job.  This is a country where you have very little leeway to argue for benefits.  If they want to do this, then come to the US.  Although I wonder why they don't just use dynamite?  Faster and few people are involved.  

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:37 PM

Based on the video and the safety of the Chinese workers they tame no precautions to staying safe. If they have this much lack of safety for themselves then how do they regard the safety of the people around them. As China is and has cities up and coming to mega cities with high rises and exponential expanding then how do they create their buildings? As fast as they went up and the city was created then how stable are their buildings?

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.

Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

Amazing turn around in policies that have been in force for decades.  Well it really is changing I think for self interest and globalization and world pressure.  First of all their population is aging rapdily and they themselves stated they will face a labor shortage if the policy doesn't change, and they will need the workforce in this global market.  Also the abolishing of the labor camps, though not said directly in the news caste you can infer that with CNN finding that the labor camps were making exported goods, the Chinese government was probably feeling pressure from world governemts to stop the practice or the exports could be effected.  With India's economic strenght growing the Chinese will need to be competitive in the global market.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 5:09 PM

The one-child policy has caused more problems than it has solved. China now has a larger male population than its female population and competition for brides is rampant. The labor camps were not actually training people in the way they wanted to, it was just an excuse to lock up people for petty crime and get free labor out of them. Hopefully, China will continue analyzing their social policies and making changes to better the country

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:32 PM

The one-child labor law is one that should be extinct now. China needs to up their standards of living and allow people their freedom of choice. Who cares if the living situations are crammed to begin with? People need to have their right to choose how many children they do or don't have.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:32 PM

As of November 2013, this CNN article says that Beijing, China plans to get rid of their one-child policy and also abolish labor camps. Sterilization and forced abortions are going to be eased upon, after the urging from many nations over the last 3 decades. CNN asks people in the street how they felt about this ease up. Citizens eagerly report that they plan on having 2 children. China is also facing an again population, which is probably why the government is changing their radical policy practiced since the 70’s. Another main outcome of this new policy is the abolishment of the labor camps called “reeducation through Labor” which put people in jail for up to 4 years without a trial. 

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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Chinese Uighurs' economic fears

Chinese Uighurs' economic fears | Als Return to Education | Scoop.it
Amid ethnic tensions, minority regards modernisation plans in Xinjiang as favouring Han Chinese migrants.

 

With not as much cultural cachet in the West as Tibet has, the Uighur population in China has still dealt with many of the same political problems in their struggle for greater autonomy, but with much less publicity.  With massive Han Chinese migration, they've become minorities in their own homeland.  


Via Seth Dixon
Al Picozzi's insight:

The Uighur people are being left out of their own homeland.  The Chinese government has sent many Han Chinese to this area.  So many in fact that the Uighur are a minority in their traditional and ancestral homeland.  The Han are getting the jobs and going to be running the new gas operations that will surely be developed by the Chinese.  Why has this not been as reported in the west?  Is it becasue the people are mostly Muslim?  The same thing happened to Tibet, but that area seems to get more press.  Or is there going ot be more of a spotlight on this area givin the natural gas that has been found in this area?  Going to be interesting area to watch as this area becomes more developed.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:17 PM

The fact that the region is China's highest producer of natural gas but it also one of the poorest regions in the state is an interesting contrast to the wealth enjoyed by oil states in the Middle East. Add to the situation the ethnic marginalization of the Uighurs, and the violence between them and the Han Chinese, and the situation sounds like it could put an unpleasant international spot light (yet again) on China.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:00 PM

Uighurs are being pushed out of their homeland because of Han Chinese migration. This article is accurate when it claims that the amount of publicity the region gets is minimum. This makes the Uighurs more at risk than Tibet. With so much attention put on areas elsewhere, China will face less international push back as it over takes yet another region who wishes to maintain its autonomy and culture.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:54 PM

I believe that without doubt today it is a bad time to be a minority in China. The Chinese are experiencing a great deal of nationalism and in turn placing economic barriers on the minorities in order to drive them out of regions so the government will be able to repopulate them with Han Chinese. While the Han Chinese have always been the majority within China its only recently the government has decided to provide them with advancement at the risk of the other ethnic groups within China.