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Animal species discovered in 2013

From a legless lizard to a new rat in a remote forest, here's a look at some new species discovered so far this year.

Via Josh Nelson
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

Interesting to know. I haven't heard of it. I didn't know that the lizard don't have legs. They are a lizard, but they looks like a snake. That's how they are legless because it's the same body as the snake.

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Gerardo Nieves's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:04 AM

Gerardo Nieves 

"Animal species Discovered in 2013"

news.msn.com

 Scoop it.com      There were 6 new species discovered in this new year of 2013,. Alot of warm blooded animals and 2 mammals. These new animals are very awesome and cool looking. Theres a new reptile, koala looking animal, rat, fish, shark, and bird. They have all been discovered this year and they are new.     The first one is a new species of reptile without legs. You might think its a snake but, its not. Its like a worm snake with scales. Its resally cool. The second is a thing called an Ollingto, its climbs trees , jumps from tree to tree, and its ki'nda like a cat+dog+ bear so its a = Catdogbear. The 3rd is a new shrew. ITS SUPER STRONG AND CAN MOVE LONG AND STUFF AND CAN LIFT MANY TIMES ITS WEIGHT. 4rth is a new shark. Its a cool shark. Its long and looks awesome. This shark can survive in low oxygen levels by increasing/sending all the blood flow to its barin and shutting down any non-function parts of its body that ts doesnt need to use. 5th is a new shark that weighs 400lbs and is at least 11ft long. 6th is a bird but, nobody really cares about birds so you know. 
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Why This Millionaire Is Attempting To Live On Just $4.50 A Day

Why This Millionaire Is Attempting To Live On Just $4.50 A Day | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
Panera Bread founder and CEO Ron Shaich earns about $3 million a year.

Via Josh Nelson
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

I think it is pretty nice that people will save money to help people who have food stamps. I was shocked when this person don't spend more than $4.50 on food. This person doesn't want to spend a lot of money on food because he wanted to save them so it will goes into food stamps. It is called a farm bill, people should know that and not the way they think.

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Josh Nelson's curator insight, September 22, 2013 8:30 PM

I think the interesting thing that most americans dont realize is that the FARM BILL is connected to all of this, and not the way that you think.  If you look at % of money that goes into the farm bill and goes into the USDA, and then look at the money that goes into food stamps, I think that most people would be shocked.

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OSU to close swine barn, sell off its hogs - Capital Press

OSU to close swine barn, sell off its hogs - Capital Press | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
OSU to close swine barn, sell off its hogs Capital Press They've been used for livestock evaluation and basic animal science courses, sold to 4-H and FFA members who raise pigs for county fair projects, and even entered in the Oregon State Fair by...

Via Josh Nelson
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

This article is talking about they are closing the swine barn and  selling the hogs to buy the repiars what they need for their barn. They wanted to sell the hogs so they can get more money to buy the repiars for their barn. They want the barn to be safe so the animals can live there safely. 

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Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say | ALS Animals | Scoop.it

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say October 08, 2013 7:33 am • Daniel Simmons-Ritchie Journal staff Tens of thousands of cattle lie dead across South Dakota on Monday following a blizzard that could become one of the most costly in the history of the state’s agriculture industry. As state officials spent the day calculating the multi-million dollar impact to the regional economy from Friday's storm, ranchers began digging up hundreds of cattle that are still buried beneath feet of snow. "This is absolutely, totally devastating," said Steve Schell, a 52-year-old rancher from Caputa. "This is horrendous. I mean the death loss of these cows in this country is unbelievable." Schell said he estimated he had lost half of his herd, but it could be far more. He was still struggling to find snow-buried cattle and those that had been pushed miles by winds that gusted at 70 miles per hour on Friday night. Martha Wierzbicki, emergency management director for Butte County, said the trail of carcasses was a gruesome sight across the region. “They’re in the fence line, laying alongside the roads,” she said. “It’s really sickening.” Silvia Christen, executive director of the South Dakota Stockgrowers Association, said most ranchers she had spoken to were reporting that 20 to 50 percent of their herds had been killed. "I have never heard of anything like it," she said. "And none of the ranchers I have talked to can remember anything like it." While South Dakota ranchers are no strangers to blizzards, what made Friday's storm so damaging was how early it arrived in the season. Christen said cattle hadn't yet grown their winter coats to insulate them from freezing wind and snow. In addition, Christen said, during the cold months, ranchers tend to move their cattle to pastures that have more trees and gullies to protect them from storms. Because Friday's storm arrived so early in the year, most ranchers were still grazing their herds on summer pasture, which tend to be more exposed and located farther away from ranch homes. Ultimately, Christen said, she believed that more than 5 percent of the roughly 1.5 million cattle in Western South Dakota had been killed. "It's much higher than that," she said. "But I'm not sure where that number is going to land." Jodie Anderson, executive director of the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association, said the pain for ranchers is now compounded by dysfunction within the federal government. While the government has programs to help ranchers who suffer losses from catastrophic weather events, those programs are in limbo because Congress has failed to pass a farm bill. The legislation is normally passed every five years and controls subsidy and insurance programs for the agriculture industry. Making things worse, because the government is currently in a partial shutdown, ranchers are unable to ask federal officials questions about how they might be reimbursed in the future. "A lot of the government agencies that we would normally be turning to for those answers are furloughed,” she said. “So there's this sort of timing issue that's enhancing the frustration out there in cattle country." The shutdown was caused after House Republicans, including U.S. Rep Kristi Noem, R-S.D., refused to pass a resolution to fund the government unless Democrats weakened or delayed parts of President Obama's 2010 health care overhaul. On Monday, Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., pointed to South Dakota's battered ranchers as another example of why House Republicans needed to continue funding the government without preconditions. "Like the snow storm, the government shutdown is causing major disruptions in people’s lives and every day business," he said in a statement. Whether they are eventually reimbursed for their losses or not, however, ranchers are likely to feel the pain for years. David Uhrig, 31, a rancher in Folsom, said he estimated about 25 percent of his herd had been killed, which meant far fewer calves this spring. “We are looking at years of rebuilding to get back to what we lost,” he said. In the short term, however, Uhrig had far more pressing concerns. Like most ranchers, he spent most of Monday searching his land for stray cattle or sorting out cattle that had drifted into neighboring herds. “It’s not uncommon at this point to find cattle that are five miles from where they should be,” he said. “Which doesn't seem like a lot, but to drift five miles in a storm — that’s a lot.” Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota’s state veterinarian, said that the next immediate challenge for ranchers would be disposal of carcasses. “That can be a significant source of disease spread, so we want to make sure those carcasses are burned, buried or rendered as quickly as possible,” he said. Oedekoven said disposal was primarily be the responsibility of ranchers themselves. However, the state was also helping ranchers get in touch with haulers that would take carcasses away for rendering. He added that, while the federal government was in poor shape to offer assistance because of the shutdown and a lack of a farm bill, ranchers should thoroughly document all cattle deaths. He said that could include taking photos, collecting cattle tags, or bringing in a veterinarian or farm service provider as an eye witness of deaths. “If you don’t keep good records about your losses you won’t be available for indemnity funds should they become available,” he said.


Via Stéphane Bisaillon, Josh Nelson
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

There was a blizzard storm in South Dakota. They didn't know about the blizzard storm coming up. They left the cattles over the night and it was snowing really bad. The cattles got buried in the heavy snow and they can't get out of the snow because the snow were too heavy and strong. The cattles was freezing to death. Over 10,000 cattles got killed by the blizzard storm. They wish that they should have get the cattles into the barn or somewhere they'll be safe before the blizzard storm is coming up. They said the cattle hadn't grow their winter coats to keep them warm because it takes a long time to grow the winter coats. But the blizzard storm came to South Dakota very early and they didn't grow their winter coats. That's why they got killed.

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Summer Rain Reimer's curator insight, December 8, 2013 10:38 AM

There was a blizzard  in South Dakota. They didn't know about the  storm coming .They left the cattles out over night and it snowed  really bad. The cattles got buried in the snow and they can't get out  because the snow was heavy . Over 10,000 cattles got killed by the blizzard. They hadent grown their winter coats to keep them warm because it takes a long time to grow the winter coats. But the blizzard came to South Dakota early then they expected and that why they had died. cause their coats didnt grow all the way in .

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:16 PM

Cassie Chriswell:

This all took place in South Dakota!  It was a big blizard that cost a lot of money due to all the cattle lost.  Officals say that it is going to be a multi-million dollar loss due to the calculations.  That's not good!  Winds gusted up to and at 70 miles per hour on that Friday night.  It was so bad because most of the cattle hadent grown a there winter fur coat yet.  Most of the cattle got blown away or frozen to death due to the cold weather.   Estimates we made that 1.5 million cattle died in South Dakota due to the biggest blizard.

Connor Emmert's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:53 AM

This kinda of thing really sucks. but theres really nothing anyone can do. I think maybe having more shelter may have helped though. the damage is in the millions , not to mention the farmers that dont have that kind of insurance. this is just a crappy thing all around

Rescooped by Almedin Cajlak from Grain du Coteau : News ( corn maize ethanol DDG soybean soymeal wheat livestock beef pigs canadian dollar)
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More Corn and Lower Grain Prices

More Corn and Lower Grain Prices | ALS Animals | Scoop.it

Rather than reduce projected yields for this corn crop, as many expected, USDA projected yields higher and corn production record high in Thursday’s monthly World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE).

Expectations for lower yields were based on recent sweltering temperatures in part of the Corn Belt and Northern Plains.

As analysts noted in last week’s USDA Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin, “Midwestern drought expanded and intensified during August, placing immature corn and soybeans under increasing levels of stress during the filling stage of development. In addition, previously favorable temperatures were replaced by late-month heat, leading to further declines in summer crop yield potential. By September 1, little more than half of the nation’s corn (56%) and soybeans (54%) were rated by USDA in good to excellent condition, down from early-July highs of 68% and 67%, respectively.”

But, WASDE analysts suggest higher yields across the South and in the Central Plains will more than offset expected yield declines in Iowa and North Dakota.

WASDE analysts increased projected corn yield by 0.9 bu./acre to 155.3 bu./acre andincreased forecast corn production to a record 13.8 billion bu. The projected season-average corn price was lowered 10¢ at both ends of the range to $4.40-$5.20/bu.

Earlier this month, Darrel Good, agricultural economist at the University of Illinois explained the crop would have to be less than 12.7 billion bu. to require rationing. There are assumptions tied up in the statement, but the projected 1 billion bu. largesse relative to that minimum should erase any rationing concerns.

It projected that soybean production continues to wilt as expected.

Estimated soybean production was sliced by 106 million bu. to 3.149 billion bu. due to lower yield prospects (estimated at 41.2 bu./acres, 1.4 bu./acre less), especially in the western Corn Belt. The projected season-average soybean price increased $1.15/bu. at both ends of the range to $11.50-$13.50/bu.

 


Via Stéphane Bisaillon
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

This article talks about the corn crop, soyboeans, and other food. They were talking about how they can rasied the price go up or down. They had to be projected for their corn crop to protect their farms when the temperature gets hot. If the temperature gets too hot and they doesn't get a lot of water to keep them survived the hot weather, they have to keep their price up because they need more water due by lower yield.

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Hannah Woosley's curator insight, September 16, 2013 5:30 AM

The artical talked abut the diffences in corn and soybeans in the past year or so. The different prices in the in past year, how they have been going up.

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Genetically Modified Food Isn't As Scary As You Think - PolicyMic

Genetically Modified Food Isn't As Scary As You Think - PolicyMic | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
PolicyMic Genetically Modified Food Isn't As Scary As You Think PolicyMic While Washington State has been in the news more for one of its initiatives which passed last year, another recent legislative battle has caught the attention of some of the...

Via Kendra Nance, Josh Nelson
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

Wow! I didn't know about this one. After reading this article, I feel like unsafe because the farmers didn't do their job to protect their food crops. It is kinda scary because the rat thing will strike them that you can't see because they're tiny. Having modified food causing tumors which is really scary because I feel like they should do their job to see what happend to their food crops they grew on the farms.

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Jacob Voorhies's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:42 AM

people are being fraked out over genetically modified foods. but so far there isnt enough evidence to prove that these GMO's are even harmful to humans. all they do is help the crop grow and help protct against pestisides

 

Sydney Bolyard's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:28 AM

-       In this particular article, there is a “see-saw” discussion, per say, as to whether or not GMOs are safe or not. As far as I am concerned, I was under the impression that genetically modified foods are processed and are questionable when it comes to consumption. It is mentioned in the article that an individual has gathered information that it is possible GMOs cause cancer. It is not said whether that is true or not, but anything is possible. I, myself, prefer organic produce because I know it has not undergone any ‘voodoo’ production.

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 3:36 PM

Cassie Chriswell: 

This article is about people responce to GMO's and if they are good or not in there eyes.  GMO's  stand for genetically modified organisms.  When you modifie food that is bacially the job that the GMO's in food do.  It could harm animals and even humans if they have to much GMO stuff in it.. But at the same time it could save a person's life.  Bacially all they do it to help grow and reproduce in the food industry. it helps us (humans) by helping us grow crops!  

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Animal species discovered in 2013

From a legless lizard to a new rat in a remote forest, here's a look at some new species discovered so far this year.

Via Josh Nelson
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

Interesting to know. I haven't heard of it. I didn't know that the lizard don't have legs. They are a lizard, but they looks like a snake. That's how they are legless because it's the same body as the snake.

more...
Gerardo Nieves's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:04 AM

Gerardo Nieves 

"Animal species Discovered in 2013"

news.msn.com

 Scoop it.com      There were 6 new species discovered in this new year of 2013,. Alot of warm blooded animals and 2 mammals. These new animals are very awesome and cool looking. Theres a new reptile, koala looking animal, rat, fish, shark, and bird. They have all been discovered this year and they are new.     The first one is a new species of reptile without legs. You might think its a snake but, its not. Its like a worm snake with scales. Its resally cool. The second is a thing called an Ollingto, its climbs trees , jumps from tree to tree, and its ki'nda like a cat+dog+ bear so its a = Catdogbear. The 3rd is a new shrew. ITS SUPER STRONG AND CAN MOVE LONG AND STUFF AND CAN LIFT MANY TIMES ITS WEIGHT. 4rth is a new shark. Its a cool shark. Its long and looks awesome. This shark can survive in low oxygen levels by increasing/sending all the blood flow to its barin and shutting down any non-function parts of its body that ts doesnt need to use. 5th is a new shark that weighs 400lbs and is at least 11ft long. 6th is a bird but, nobody really cares about birds so you know. 
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Weld livestock owners recovering from rescue efforts - Greeley Tribune

Weld livestock owners recovering from rescue efforts - Greeley Tribune | ALS Animals | Scoop.it
Weld livestock owners recovering from rescue efforts
Greeley Tribune
This past weekend, Kersey-area rancher Kevin Ochsner found himself on Weld County Road 44 near U.S.
Almedin Cajlak's insight:

There was a flooding throughout northeast Colorado. There are more than 500,000 cattles and calves. There are about 180 cattles that got stuck in the flooding and people were trying to get them out of the flooding so they would not die in flooding when the water's getting high. The owners of the cattles and calves will be recovering from rescue efforts. 

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