Almanac Pests
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Almanac Pests
Plant pests of current importance (potential or existing risk for the European region)
Curated by Knapco
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After 17-year wait, cicadas appear again in Staten Island

After 17-year wait, cicadas appear again in Staten Island | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

Population of adult periodical Cicadae will occure from mid-to-late May 2013 (they occured in 1979 and 1996 & the next occurence will be in 2030). Staten Islanders will start to notice the noisy critters as millions dig their way out from a depth of about 18 inches. Once they emerge, the cicadas split their nymphal skins after feeding on tree-root sap for 17 years to become mature, winged adults.

The males waste no time looking for romance; their distinctive "singing" will continue throughout June. Waiting females hang back and listen for a male's song that particularly impresses them before choosing a mate.

"Please pass the earplugs: Cicadas set to announce their first arrival since 1996 ..."

Knapco's insight:

Periodical Cicadae are smaller and narrower-bodied as annual cicada. Their bright red eyes contrast in their black bodies.Magicicadas are found only in eastern part of US. They have long life cycle: 13 years in the south and 17 years in the north. There are 3 different species of periodical cicadas in Staten Island, all on a 17 year cycle.

Only young broadleaf trees need net or other physical protection against massive occurence of cicadas. The pest netting needs to be wrapped completely around the tree and tied, or sealed off, to keep any insects from finding an entryway. Even if the Cicadas have already emerged, one has 5-10 days to cover young trees before the female begins to cause damage, as she lays her eggs.

Read more: http://hydrodictyon.eeb.uconn.edu/projects/cicada/resources/magilit.html

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Spatial Patterns and Spread of Potato Zebra Chip Disease in the Texas Panhandle

Spatial Patterns and Spread of Potato Zebra Chip Disease in the Texas Panhandle | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

Zebra chip (ZC, also known as papa manchada and papa rayada) is a disease that is affecting potato production in the southwestern United States and in other countries, and which has been linked to potato psyllids (Bactericera cockerelli, which infests both potatoes and tomatoes) that harbor the bacterial plant pathogen ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’.

Until recently, the epidemiology of ZC was unknown, motivating research to elucidate the spatial and temporal patterns of ZC infections in potato fields. Studies were performed in multiple commercial potato fields located in the Texas Panhandle, wherein locations of ZC-affected potato plants were georeferenced or counted within large plots and along belt transects consisting of contiguous 10-by-10-m quadrats. The frequency of ZC infections within belt transect quadrats was well described by negative binomial and zero-inflated negative binomial distributions, in agreement with observed clustering of infections and distance-based spatial statistical results.


Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 7, Page 948-956, July 2012.

By D. C. Henne, F. Workneh and C. M. Rush, Texas AgriLife Research

http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-09-11-0805-RE

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