Almanac Pests
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Almanac Pests
Plant pests of current importance (potential or existing risk for the European region)
Curated by Knapco
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BioEssays: Sex or no sex: Evolutionary adaptation occurs regardless (2014)

BioEssays: Sex or no sex: Evolutionary adaptation occurs regardless (2014) | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

All species continuously evolve to adapt to changing environments. The genetic variation that fosters such adaptation is caused by a plethora of mechanisms, including meiotic recombination that generates novel allelic combinations in the progeny of two parental lineages. However, a considerable number of eukaryotic species, including many fungi, do not have an apparent sexual cycle and are consequently thought to be limited in their evolutionary potential. As such organisms are expected to have reduced capability to eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often considered as evolutionary dead ends. However, inspired by recent reports we argue that such organisms can be as persistent as organisms with conventional sexual cycles through the use of other mechanisms, such as genomic rearrangements, to foster adaptation.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
Knapco's insight:

Verticillium dahliae is among 20% of fungal species lacking sexual cycle of reproduction. However, the authors suggest that its genome contains a high amount of transposable elements (TE) which may drive genome evolution in this pathogen. TEs are DNA sequences that can change their position within genome and can impact the genome by inducing gene knockouts, modulating gene regulation or causing double-stranded DNA breaks. These sources of variability enable evolution: selection and adaptaion to plant hosts and evolution of fungal aggressiveness.

Similar asexual mechanisms facilitate genome evolution in other eukaryotes, known to be plant pathogens: Phytophthora infestans causing potato blight, Leptosphaeria maculans causing stem canker on Brassica, Blumeria graminis causing powdery mildew, Alternaria spp., Fusarium spp., Mycosphaerella graminicola...

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Steve Marek's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:01 AM

Textbook stuff!

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Nomanclature of microbes

  • Classification of living organisms into groups › For better and convenient understanding and study of organisms.
  • 7 groups are based on convenient, observable characteristics.e.g Five kingdom system of classification.
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First Record of Elixothrips brevisetis (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Brazil - Springer

First Record of Elixothrips brevisetis (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Brazil - Springer | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

Neotropical Entomology

February 2013, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 115-117

Elixothrips brevisetis (Bagnall), a species exotic to Brazil, is first recorded in the country. Individuals were collected on banana fruits (Musa sp.) (Musaceae) in July 2010 in the municipality of Luís Alves, state of Santa Catarina, causing rusting on the fruit peel in several bunches of bananas

Knapco's insight:

The article could be read at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13744-012-0090-4#page-1

General distribution of the species: Seychelles Islands, Taiwan, Philippines, Pacific IslandsSynonymsTryphactothrips brevisetis Bagnall, 1919Dinurothrips guamensis Moulton, 1942

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