Almanac Pests
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Almanac Pests
Plant pests of current importance (potential or existing risk for the European region)
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In Hop Pursuit: Appearance of Hop Stunt Viroid

In Hop Pursuit: Appearance of Hop Stunt Viroid | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

The Mt. Rainier variety is a fine hop that hasn’t taken off yet. Mt. Rainier was released right after this huge oversupply of hops occurred and there was very little demand for hops--new or old. The production and distribution of Mt. Rainier was also hampered by the appearance of hop stunt viroid in 2008. To make a long story short, it was entered into the Clean Plant Network as soon as possible and if I’m not mistaken, will become available this year for limited distribution of cuttings. 

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A Viroid Resembling Hop Stunt Viroid in Grapevines from Europe, the United States and Japan

A viroid (GV) was isolated from grapevines recently introduced into Japan from France, West Germany, Austria, Hungary and U.S.A., as well as from those cultivated in Japan. It was detected in 28 out of 32 (88%) grapevines tested. The isolates of GV had similar host ranges and induced symptoms in cucumber plants identical to those induced by hop stunt viroid (HSV).

The result indicates that GV is a grapevine isolate of HSV and suggests that grapevines were the source of hop stunt disease in Japan.

Sano et al. (1986) A Viroid Resembling Hop Stunt Viroid in Grapevines from Europe, the United States and Japan.- J Gen Virol August 1986 vol. 67 no. 8 1673-1678

doi: 10.1099/0022-1317-67-8-1673

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Root-Knot Nematodes in Golf Course Greens of the Western United States

Root-Knot Nematodes in Golf Course Greens of the Western United States | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

A survey of 238 golf courses in 10 states of the western United States found root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) in 60% of the putting greens sampled. Sequence and phylogenetic molecular analyses were used to identify specimens from 110 golf courses. The most common species, Meloidogyne naasi, was found in 58 golf courses distributed from Southern California to Washington in the coastal or cooler areas of those states. In the warmer regions of the Southwest, M. marylandi was recovered from 38 golf courses and M. graminis from 11 golf courses. Two golf courses in Washington were infested with M. minor, which is the first record of this nematode in the Western Hemisphere. Columbia root-knot nematode, M. chitwoodi, was found in a single golf course in California.

 

McClure MA, Nischwitz C, Skantar AM, Schmitt ME, Subbotin SA (2012) Root-Knot Nematodes in Golf Course Greens of the Western United States.- Plant Disease Volume 96, Number 5 Pages 635-647 http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-09-11-0808

 

 

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Corn Nematodes | Maumee Valley Agriculture and Natural Resources

Corn Nematodes | Maumee Valley Agriculture and Natural Resources | Almanac Pests | Scoop.it

What is an impact in the current areas of distribution?


LaBarge G., Fulton County, USA: First we need to recognize “corn nematodes” are different from soybean cyst nematode in a big way. SCN is a single species while “corn nematodes” are actually a list of 28 species with 10-12 species considered important.

Iowa State has a good Certified Crop Advisor Module on corn nematodes on-line. Quick facts on corn nematodes and results of the Illinois State Survey can be found trough Ohio State University pages.

The purpose of the corn nematode survey was to help understand the potential for corn yield loss due to nematodes in Illinois (Niblack, 2010). 


Most every field in Iowa has some corn nematodes, but not necessarily at damaging levels. Two corn nematode species, the sting nematode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) and the needle nematode (Longidorus), only occur in soils with greater than 70 percent sand. Many instances of damage by corn nematodes are small reductions in yield and such yield loss may be difficult to detect. There is a corn cyst nematode that is somewhat akin to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), which thoroughly infests Iowa and the Midwest. But currently, the corn cyst nematode isn’t really a concern or eminent threat to corn production in the Midwest (Tylka, 2012). 

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