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Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development Intergroup Activity ... - TheParliamentMagazine.eu

Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development Intergroup Activity ... - TheParliamentMagazine.eu | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it
Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development Intergroup Activity ...

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FYI: Background on the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 2014 #WCIP2014

FYI: Background on the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 2014 #WCIP2014 | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

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Indigenous People's curator insight, October 22, 2:13 PM
Indigenous Peoples Around the World

Indigenous peoples represent remarkable diversity – more than 5,000 distinct groups in some 90 countries. They make up more than 5 per cent of the world’s population, some 370 million people. Yet, they are among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable. Today, many indigenous peoples struggle to remain on their lands and retain the right to their natural resources. Other indigenous peoples have long since been removed from their lands, denied their languages and traditional ways, and have consequently been left impoverished.

Engagement with the United Nations

Indigenous peoples are effective advocates for their rights and they have engaged the United Nations since its establishment. Indeed, they also brought their concerns to the League of Nations earlier in the 1920s. However, little progress was made until the 1980s, when the Working Group on Indigenous Populations was established in Geneva and the ILO adopted Convention No. 169 on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples. The First International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples was launched in 1994 followed by a Second Decade, which will end in December 2014.

During these two decades, the United Nations and indigenous peoples have made significant progress in their collaboration, with the establishment of the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. In 2007 the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The Declaration sets out minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.

The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples

The General Assembly, in its resolution 65/198 of 21 December 2010, decided to organize a high-level plenary meeting of the General Assembly, to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, in order to share perspectives and best practices on the realization of the rights of indigenous peoples, including pursuing the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

In its resolution 66/296, the General Assembly further decided that the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples would be held on 22 September 2014 and in the afternoon of 23 September 2014 in New York.

The World Conference was composed of two plenary meetings in the form of an opening and a closing session, three interactive round-table discussions and one interactive panel discussion, with the opening meeting beginning at 9 a.m. on 22 September 2014, followed, in the afternoon, by two round-table discussions taking place simultaneously.

To provide valuable input into the preparatory process for the World Conference, the President of the General Assembly organized on 17 and 18 June 2014 an informal interactive hearing with representatives of indigenous peoples and representatives of entities of the United Nations system, academic institutions, national human rights institutions, parliamentarians, civil society and non-governmental organizations, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the present resolution.

The World Conference resulted in a concise, action-oriented outcome document prepared on the basis of inclusive and open informal consultations with Member States and indigenous peoples.

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Sobrevivientes del cambio climático - La Prensa

Sobrevivientes del cambio climático - La Prensa | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

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CGIAR Climate's curator insight, July 15, 8:39 AM

En el caso de los más de tres mil productores que participan en el proyecto del que son parte Pérez y Díaz, estas acciones se han desarrollado en base a resultados de investigaciones realizadas por el Programa de Investigación de Cambio Climático, Agricultura y Seguridad Alimentaria (CCAFS por sus siglas en inglés).

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Women Invent: 100 top women in science, technology, engineering and maths – Part 1

Women Invent: 100 top women in science, technology, engineering and maths – Part 1 | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it
As Silicon Republic’s Women Invent Tomorrow campaign launches for a second year, we publish Part 1 of our listing of some of the leading women in the areas of science, technology, engineering and maths.

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Expert Meeting: Latin American Economic Outlook Education, Skills and Developmen 3 July 201 OECD Conference Centre, Paris - by invitation onl

Expert Meeting: Latin American Economic Outlook Education, Skills and Developmen  3 July 201 OECD Conference Centre, Paris - by invitation onl | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it
Experts and the Secretariat will discuss the concept for the next Latin American Economic Outlook (LEO) 2015, as well as the outlines for the chapter on education and skills and the chapter on Latin America and shifting wealth (with a focus on skills and labour market).

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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, July 3, 4:12 AM

 

Experts and the Secretariat will discuss the concept for the next Latin American Economic Outlook (LEO) 2015, as well as the outlines for the chapter on education and skills and the chapter on Latin America and shifting wealth (with a focus on skills and labour market).

 

A defining reform to increase potential growth and withstand a less benign external environment in Latin America is that of education. More and better education and skills, supported by improvements in innovation policies, are key elements to overcome the middle-income trap and to boost social inclusion.

 

Latin American Economic Outlook 2015, jointly produced by the OECD, UN-ECLAC and CAF, will analyse the current situation of education, skills and innovation in Latin America, in the context of shifting wealth, and will point out some areas for further progress. This OECD flagship publication on Latin America will be launched at the IberoAmerican Summit in Veracruz in December 2014.

 

Related Documents

 

OECD Development Week 2014

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California and Mexico: Valuable teammates in the fight against climate chang

California and Mexico: Valuable teammates in the fight against climate chang | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, June 14, 4:29 AM

For nearly a decade, California’s landmark climate change law, AB 32, has been widely recognized for its efforts to curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and build a low-carbon future.

Working together, California and Mexico can maximize the mutual benefits of setting high environmental standards to build low-carbon economies for the future. (Photo credit: Flickr user gabofr)

While climate action in Washington, D.C. continues to be stymied, our neighbor to the south is a key player and emerging leader on the global climate stage and is willing and able to join California in the fight.

Mexico has been a leader in advancing UN global climate change talks and recently passed its own historic climate change law.

These actions have garnered much attention from the international community, including Governor Jerry Brown.

In fact, his administration has indicated it is reaching out to Mexico on climate change, and just this week we’ve learned that Mexico’s President, Enrique Peña Nieto, is planning a visit to the Golden State.

The opportunities here can’t be overstated. As Governor Brown pointed out in his 2014 State of the State Address, if we want to move the needle on cutting carbon pollution, California can’t do it alone.

The collaboration between California and Mexico could be a powerful force to move global action on climate change forward, while creating mutual benefits. And, the partnership is both a natural and practical one.  California and Mexico have deep cultural, political, and economic ties that bind their histories, and climate change represents an opportunity for leaders on both sides of the border to work together to shape our collective future.

There are five primary areas where Mexico’s and California’s existing efforts to curb climate change align:

 - See more at: http://blogs.edf.org/climatetalks/category/mexico/#sthash.sboFbdnr.dpuf

For nearly a decade, California’s landmark climate change law, AB 32, has been widely recognized for its efforts to curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and build a low-carbon future.

Working together, California and Mexico can maximize the mutual benefits of setting high environmental standards to build low-carbon economies for the future. (Photo credit: Flickr user gabofr)

While climate action in Washington, D.C. continues to be stymied, our neighbor to the south is a key player and emerging leader on the global climate stage and is willing and able to join California in the fight.

Mexico has been a leader in advancing UN global climate change talks and recently passed its own historic climate change law.

These actions have garnered much attention from the international community, including Governor Jerry Brown.

In fact, his administration has indicated it is reaching out to Mexico on climate change, and just this week we’ve learned that Mexico’s President, Enrique Peña Nieto, is planning a visit to the Golden State.

The opportunities here can’t be overstated. As Governor Brown pointed out in his 2014 State of the State Address, if we want to move the needle on cutting carbon pollution, California can’t do it alone.

The collaboration between California and Mexico could be a powerful force to move global action on climate change forward, while creating mutual benefits. And, the partnership is both a natural and practical one.  California and Mexico have deep cultural, political, and economic ties that bind their histories, and climate change represents an opportunity for leaders on both sides of the border to work together to shape our collective future.

There are five primary areas where Mexico’s and California’s existing efforts to curb climate change align:

 - See more at: http://blogs.edf.org/climatetalks/category/mexico/#sthash.sboFbdnr.dpuf

For nearly a decade, California’s landmark climate change law, AB 32, has been widely recognized for its efforts to curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and build a low-carbon future.

Working together, California and Mexico can maximize the mutual benefits of setting high environmental standards to build low-carbon economies for the future. (Photo credit: Flickr user gabofr)

While climate action in Washington, D.C. continues to be stymied, our neighbor to the south is a key player and emerging leader on the global climate stage and is willing and able to join California in the fight.

Mexico has been a leader in advancing UN global climate change talks and recently passed its own historic climate change law.

These actions have garnered much attention from the international community, including Governor Jerry Brown.

In fact, his administration has indicated it is reaching out to Mexico on climate change, and just this week we’ve learned that Mexico’s President, Enrique Peña Nieto, is planning a visit to the Golden State.

The opportunities here can’t be overstated. As Governor Brown pointed out in his 2014 State of the State Address, if we want to move the needle on cutting carbon pollution, California can’t do it alone.

The collaboration between California and Mexico could be a powerful force to move global action on climate change forward, while creating mutual benefits. And, the partnership is both a natural and practical one.  California and Mexico have deep cultural, political, and economic ties that bind their histories, and climate change represents an opportunity for leaders on both sides of the border to work together to shape our collective future.

There are five primary areas where Mexico’s and California’s existing efforts to curb climate change align:

 - See more at: http://blogs.edf.org/climatetalks/category/mexico/#sthash.sboFbdnr.dpuf
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Three Weeks Left to Nominate Your Women's Rights Hero

Three Weeks Left to Nominate Your Women's Rights Hero | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, June 20, 2:11 PM
Three Weeks Left to Nominate Your Women's Rights Hero

 

Malala Yousafzai, Maya Angelou, and Alaa Murabit. Three extraordinary people who stood up for women’s rights and made change happen. Now we are looking for other women and men from all walks of life, known and unknown, who are making a difference. Help us find them, so that we can reward their efforts with a cash prize that can contribute to amplify their impact. 


Nominate your hero for the third annual Trust Women Hero Award.


Each year at the Trust Women Conference, we celebrate a remarkable person whose bold thinking and high-impact work has helped women defend and advance their rights. Nominees are judged on their leadership as well as the impact, scalability, and groundbreaking nature of their work.

 

The winner will be announced at a special Awards ceremony at Trust Women. He/she will receive a cash prize of $5,000 to help further their work and will also be acknowledged with profiles on the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Trust Women websites.

 

The closing date for entries is Friday, 4 July, so submit your nominations soon! The application process will take you about 15 minutes, and you will be asked to submit information on the nominee, his or her leadership, impact, and future goals. For any application query, please contact:

 

lauren.ottulich@thomsonreuters.com.

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World Conference on Indigenous Peoples - Press Conference

World Conference on Indigenous Peoples - Press Conference | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it
Speakers: H.E. Mr. Evo Morales, President of Bolivia; Mr. Ivan Simonovic, Assistant Secretary General for Human Rights and Ms. Aili Keskitalo, President of the Sami Parliament.

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Fair and ethical investments are key to Africa’s economic transformation – Africa Progress Panel

Fair and ethical investments are key to Africa’s economic transformation – Africa Progress Panel | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it
Africa needs to transform its economy so that growth benefits all and reduces poverty and inequality. Investment is a vital ingredient of such a transformation – but only if they are transparent and fair.

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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, August 2, 1:49 AM


The Ahafo mine, in dense forest in central Ghana, is operated by Newmont Gold Ghana Limited (NGGL), a subsidiary of US-based Newmont Mining Corporation. When I visited the area in February 2014, the communities that host the mine looked very small in comparison with the scale of NGGL’s revenues: US$528 million in 2009, about 10% of Ghana’s total exports and 4.5% of its total foreign direct investment.

Newmont’s position in Ghana demonstrates the key economic role that foreign investments play in Africa – including investments from US companies. It is also an example of the remarkable profits that foreign investors can make.

 

Despite the investments pouring into Africa, however, poverty is widespread, education and health infrastructure is inadequate, and millions of children go to bed hungry. Why such a disconnect? One reason is that many investments are not made in a transparent and accountable manner. As a result African governments lose huge sums of money.

Making investments fair, ethical and mutually beneficial ought to be at the heart of discussions as 50 Africa leaders gather in Washington D.C at the historic U.S.–Africa Leaders Summit on August 4-6, 2014. The summit –the first time a sitting U.S. president has invited so many African heads of state and government – offers an opportunity to lay down some ground rules for ethical investment that benefits the greatest number of Africans.

 

Africa has some of the fastest-growing economies in the world, with an average growth rate of 5% per year. It also has abundant natural and human resources, making it a region with tremendous investment opportunities. Today, foreign direct investment (FDI) is the largest source of private capital in Africa. The continent’s share of FDI projects – though it decreased from 774 in 2012 to 750 in 2013 – has reached the highest level in a decade. It now depends far less on aid than it did a decade ago.

Many of these investments are going into sectors that are not necessarily improving Africans’ livelihoods, however. The oil, gas and mining sectors tend to operate in enclaves that have weak links to the local economy. The other part of the story is that Africa too often gets unethical investments that stifle efforts to foster inclusive growth, reduce poverty, and enhance food and nutrition security.

For example, Africa loses an estimated 5.7% of its GDP annually in illicit financial flows, principally because of tax evasion. The 2013 Africa Progress Report, Equity in Extractives: Stewarding Africa’s natural resources for all, reveals how these practices deny governments in resource-rich African regions billions of dollars to support development.

 

Agriculture and fisheries suffer from chronic underinvestment and from unethical investment. The plunder of fisheries and forestry resources as a result of corrupt practices and unscrupulous investment activities causes West Africa to lose an estimated US$1.3 billion, according to this year’s Africa Progress Report, Grain, Fish, Money: Financing Africa’s Green and Blue Revolutions. Another US$17 billion is lost through illicit logging activities. Kofi Annan, former UN Secretary General and chair of the Africa Progress Panel, adds that the “natural resource plunder is organized theft disguised as commerce”.

 

Africa needs to transform its economy so that growth benefits all and reduces poverty and inequality. Investment is a vital ingredient of such a transformation – but only if they are transparent and fair.

Ethical investments in agriculture are particularly important, because agriculture’s potential is huge. With two-thirds of Africans depending on farming, boosting agriculture is a highly effective way to reduce poverty and inequality. “We have to significantly boost our agriculture and fisheries, which together provide livelihoods for roughly two-thirds of all Africans,” says Mr. Annan.

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New photo story and more, on CCAFS climate smart villages - UNCCD

New photo story and more, on CCAFS climate smart villages - UNCCD | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

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CGIAR Climate's curator insight, July 24, 3:18 AM

As part of their climate smart village activities, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) is working with local partners and a local youth group to manage the challenges of an increasingly variable rain, as well as degraded land and decreasing land sizes.

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ITU, UN Women to Recognize Work in Tech for Gender Equality

ITU, UN Women to Recognize Work in Tech for Gender Equality | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

ITU and UN Women are partnering to launch a new global technology award that recognizes outstanding contributions from women and men in leveraging the potential of ICTs to promote gender equality. 


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Our Planet: The First United Nations Environment Assembly in Nairobi Kenya

United Nations Environment Programme

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Canadians Rally to Support Native Women - Fars News Agency

Canadians Rally to Support Native Women - Fars News Agency | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it
Fars News Agency Canadians Rally to Support Native Women Fars News Agency The protest comes as the Canadian conservative government has repeatedly resisted launching a national public inquiry into the cases of missing or murdered indigenous women,...
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Knowledge Gateway @Empower_Women UN entity for #GenderEquality & Women's #Empowerment (@UNWomen).

Knowledge Gateway @Empower_Women  UN entity for #GenderEquality & Women's #Empowerment (@UNWomen). | Alma Abierta Project | Scoop.it

The latest from Knowledge Gateway @Empower_Women. Knowledge platform for resources & tools on women's economic empowerment facilitated by the UN entity for #genderequality & women's #empowerment (UN Women). Global


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Dr Lendy Spires's curator insight, June 4, 11:59 PM

 

The Knowledge Gateway is an open global community for knowledge mobilization, innovation and partnerships for women’s economic empowerment

 

Our Mission

Our mission is to offer a user-friendly, demand-driven one-stop service community where you can find and share resources and tools for women’s economic empowerment and connect with experts, peers, networks and potential partners.

 We aim to create a cross-collaboration network between women and girls and advanced experts and professionals and enhance women and girls’ capacity to drive innovation for a better world.

 

Our Staff

 The Knowledge Gateway is managed by a team of UN Women staff in New York and in Bangkok, Cairo, Dakar, Istanbul, Nairobi and Panama.

 

Our Values

 Our key values are inclusive, collaborative and community-driven.

 

Our Community

 Together with women entrepreneurs, women workers and women farmers we develop solutions to create better economic lives for women. Our community is diverse—we engage with policy makers, researchers, teachers, students, entrepreneurs, civil society activists, impact investors, social change-makers.

 

Our Advisory Board members include: the Government of Canada, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, International Labour Office, the International Association for Feminist Economics and the World Bank.

 

Advantages of Joining our Community

 Access world expertiseDrive innovation with creative ideas and partnershipsEnhance your professional visibility and get recognition for your contributionsLearn, join webinars and access how-to-tools, learning kits and success storiesSave time and resources

 

Get started

 To get started and become our community member, please register. This will enable you to: Connect with other members, Share and download resources, Post comments in the Knowledge Library and Knowledge Circles. You will also benefit from learning opportunities in the Learning Center.

 

We aim to create a truly community-driven online platform and to provide right incentives for our community members to learn and enhance their professional skills. You can apply to become our

“Global Community Champion for Women’s Economic Empowerment” and be recognized for your contributions and get premier guidance and support to drive community engagement and advocacy on women’s economic empowerment worldwide.

 

History

 In October 2011, Canada and UN Women co-hosted an international Conference on Women’s Economic Empowerment in Ottawa. The conference assembled more than 100 global experts, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, development practitioners, academics, and business and industry leaders to share their experiences and best practices on how to break down the barriers to women’s economic empowerment.

 

Through a series of high-profile roundtables, conference participants provided key recommendations for action to advance women’s and girls’ rights, opportunities and participation in the economy. One of these recommendations was the need for a dynamic platform for improved sharing of evidence, experiences and good practices.

 

At the Ottawa Conference, UN Women and Canada committed to jointly develop an online Knowledge Gateway on Women’s Economic Empowerment.

 

On 23 September 2013, the Knowledge Gateway was launched during the high-level session of the United Nations General Assembly. The launch was hosted by Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN Women, and Lynne Yelich, Minister of State, Foreign Affairs and Consular, Government of Canada. See for further details the programme, video and press release.

 

Contact us

 

Knowledge Gateway for Women’s Economic Empowerment

UN Women
220 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017
Email: knowledge.gateway@unwomen.org