Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning
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9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics

9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics | Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning | Scoop.it
Motivating students to be (enthusiastically) receptive is one of the most important aspects of mathematics instruction and a critical aspect of the Common Core State Standards. Effective teachers sho
Rebecca Siegel's insight:

Thanks to Dr. Bote for tweeting about this!  I love the ideas this Edutopia article shares about motivating students in math.  I particularly like the part about presenting a challenge.  I feel that many classrooms forget about challenging students, in turn, losing many students' interest after completion of their work.  By engaging students with pertinent stories and using useful topics in your lessons, students will maintain interest in the lessons.

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Jennifer Callaway's curator insight, December 13, 2013 4:31 PM

These strategies are things that I've been witnessing my math methods teacher use all semester. In my classroom I'm trying to be more aware of the questions I'm asking and the language I'm using. Again, going back to creating a community of learners - presenting students with a challenge and having them find a pattern and using justifications with partners/groups promotes student engagement, interest, and discussion. This article has great suggestions for how I can go about doing these things in my classroom.

Michelle Jin's curator insight, December 15, 2013 3:42 PM
This article offers some great ideas in how to get students to fall in love with studying math. Not only did it list 9 innovative (but doable!) strategies to motivate my math students, it also harps on how teachers need to be able to choose wisely from this list to adjust to the specific motivations that are already present in my learners. I think it's easy to read this article and think that each of these strategies would be equally successful in any classroom; however, I'm reminded that knowing your students is the most effective strategy in motivating them. By doing that, you're able to know what engages them and what doesn't interest them as much. Although the author of this article did not write "knowing your students" as part of his 9 strategies, I was able to take away that important, and more implicit message that would help me to use the rest of his techniques more effectively. Another reason why I appreciated reading this article is that many of the strategies listed involve student discovery and initiative. For example, strategy #9 suggests teachers to "get students actively involved in justifying mathematical curiosities." Other strategies suggested were presenting students with a challenge that is within reach, discovering a pattern, or calling attention to a void in knowledge. All of these techniques are much less teacher-dependent, but put the learning responsibility on the students! As I have observed much from my own past experiences and my current student teaching internship, students seem to be able to learn and retain information much more when they themselves are the "doers" in the classroom, not just receivers of information.
Julia Lyles's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:10 PM

Growing up I always struggled with math and never had any motivation to do it. Now that I am interning in a classroom I realize how important it is to motivate students to reach their full potential even in a subject they may not feel very confident in. I can motivate them in a number of ways including challenging them and building on their achievement. I never want my students to feel as though they can't do math. I want to give them a variety of strategies to motivate them and encourage their learning.

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Solving a Problem? Make a Plan!

Solving a Problem? Make a Plan! | Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning | Scoop.it
When teachers help students make a problem solving plan at the beginning of the school year it will benefit everyone throughout the year. Watch as one Math class works together to make the problem solving plan.

Via Tiffany Tucker
Rebecca Siegel's insight:

I found this nice video form Tiffany and I think it explains a very important topic of making chidlren responsible for their learning.  By teaching in a way that creates student responsibility from day one, they will likely find things that are more relevant and beneficial throughout the year.  The more choice and control students have, the more interested they will be in their learning.

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Tiffany Tucker's curator insight, October 28, 2013 8:32 PM

When learners are given the necessary tools, they are more likely to succeed. This "Make A Plan" video describes how students are taught to problem solve on their own without having to be guided by the teacher. 

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Student-Centered Learning Strategies for Math and Other Subjects

Student-Centered Learning Strategies for Math and Other Subjects | Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning | Scoop.it
Editor's Note: Paul Bogdan was once an old-fashioned lecturing teacher centered secondary math teacher who left teaching for 14 years to build computer systems.
Rebecca Siegel's insight:

This awesome article has great ways to put students in charge of their learning.  Although this would only work with older students, I love the idea of students teaching the lesson.  This gives them a chance to not only have control of their learning, but be independent and give the teacher a chance to work with a handful of students who need enrichment or extra help.

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The Role Of Student Choice In Connected Classrooms - Edudemic

The Role Of Student Choice In Connected Classrooms - Edudemic | Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning | Scoop.it
With the influx of technology into connected classrooms, the role of student choice has become as important as ever.
Rebecca Siegel's insight:

By providing student choice in the classroom, their success will increase.  This article touches on the use of iPads in the classroom, which I think provide a great deal of choice in the classroom.  My mentor's classroom has two iPad Minis and we now allow them to pick their activity (within reading or within math) during their centers.  All of the apps on the iPad are approved by us, and by allowing students to select their own, they remain engaged and interested in the activity the whole time.

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Heather Wehrle's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:04 AM

I love this author's idea that as adults, we need to realize that young people are able to make decisions as well.  Instead of deciding that we always know best, we should give up some of our control in the classroom and allow students to have a voice in their own learning.  When we assign the same work to every student in the class, we are not giving them the individual opportunities that they need to grow.  Allowing students to make some choices about their own learning helps teachers to meet the students where they are at.  It gives the student an opportunity to take charge of their own learning and develop as an individual.

 

This is particularly difficult because this type of learning is not how we were raised in schools.  However, if we become carbon copies of how we were taught, positive change will never happen.  We need to realize that there are better ways to address the needs of students.  Using technology is a great way to allow students to make choices as well as teach them some 21st century skills.  As teachers, we should be preparing students for real life, where they will have to make important decisions that impact their own well-being.  The best place for this to start is in a classroom where they have teacher guidance and peer support.  I hope to create a community in my future classroom that allows students to make choices throughout the day and take charge of their own learning.  This is especially true of assessment: I want to assess students on what they actually know, not how good they are at taking tests.  Instead of always using the same summative assessments, I want to incorporate choice in how students share with myself and the class that they have learned the material, such as speeches, plays, posters, powerpoints, journal entries, ect.  

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1st Grade - Games & Homework Help

1st Grade - Games & Homework Help | Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning | Scoop.it
Play educational games on addition, subtraction, shapes, writing & grammar. Free worksheets, skills & homework help for First grade students & teachers.
Rebecca Siegel's insight:

Providing students with the time to play computer games that are educational is an important aspect of learning.  Using computers helps students develop lifelong technology skills while still focusing on their learning.  This website has both math and reading activities.  This website allows students to have choice in what game they play, all serving educational purposes.  This site and others will be helpful during computer center in my future classroom.

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Challenge by Choice with Tiered Instruction and Assessment

Challenge by Choice with Tiered Instruction and Assessment | Allow Learners to Take Charge of their Learning | Scoop.it
*** What happens when students set the bar for their own learning? ***
Rebecca Siegel's insight:

This website has resources that help teachers create tiered instruction in a choice right classroom.  It appears that they feel, the more choice you provide, the more challenged students will be.  They will in turn pick things that push their comfort level and challenge themselves.

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