All Things Geography
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All Things Geography
Teaching and learning material for geography education or for curious minds
Curated by Tom Rees
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More Than Half of World’s Population Now Lives in Cities

The latest edition of the publication Demographia World Urban Areas shows that the migration of rural people to urban areas continues, with 26 of those areas now considered “megacities.”...

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West Papua's indigenous people hurt by Indonesia's resource extraction – video

West Papua's indigenous people hurt by Indonesia's resource extraction – video | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Indigenous tribes living in West Papua face are suffering as their land is destroyed by timber and palm oil companies...
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The Energy Wars Heat Up. An interesting article on the Geopolitical issues surrounding oil.

The Energy Wars Heat Up. An interesting article on the Geopolitical issues surrounding oil. | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Conflict and intrigue over valuable energy supplies have been features of the international landscape for a long time.  Major wars over oil have been fought every decade or so since World War I, and smaller engagements have erupted every few years; a flare-up or two in 2012, then, would be part of the normal scheme of things.  Instead, what we are now seeing is a whole cluster of oil-related clashes stretching across the globe, involving a dozen or so countries, with more popping up all the time.  Consider these flash-points as signals that we are entering an era of intensified conflict over energy.

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Water Facts: Water

Water Facts: Water | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community. For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded

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News & Multimedia « Africa Human Development Report 2012

News & Multimedia « Africa Human Development Report 2012 | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Addressing hunger precondition for sustained human development in sub-Saharan Africa, UNDP Report says food security must be at centre of continent’s development agenda.

 

Nairobi, Kenya, 15 May 2012—Sub-Saharan Africa cannot sustain its present economic resurgence unless it eliminates the hunger that affects nearly a quarter of its people, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) argues in the newly released Africa Human Development Report 2012: Towards a Food Secure Future.

 

"Impressive GDP growth rates in Africa have not translated into the elimination of hunger and malnutrition. Inclusive growth and people-centred approaches to food security are needed” said UNDP Administrator Helen Clark at the launch today, attended by Kenya’s President Mwai Kibaki.

 

Arguing that action focused on agriculture alone will not end food insecurity either, the Report calls for new approaches covering multiple sectors; from rural infrastructure to health services, to new forms of social protection and empowering local communities. Ensuring that the poor and vulnerable have greater voice through strengthened local government and civil society groups is also needed to ensure food security for all.

 

The quickening pace of change and new economic vitality on the continent make this an opportune time for action, the Report says.
“Building a food-secure future for all Africans will only be achieved if efforts span the entire development agenda” Helen Clark said.

 

While acknowledging that there are no quick fixes, the report argues that food security can be achieved through immediate action in four critical areas: Increasing agricultural productivity; more effective nutrition; building resilience; empowerment and social justice.

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Canadian Oil Sands

Canadian Oil Sands | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Once considered too expensive, as well as too damaging to the land, exploitation of Alberta's oil sands is now a gamble worth billions.
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New Evidence Reveals Shell Wildly Underreported Niger Delta Oil Spill

New Evidence Reveals Shell Wildly Underreported Niger Delta Oil Spill | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
New data shows Shell dramatically under-estimated the damage of a 2008 spill that devastated the lives of tens of thousands of people in Niger Delta. Shell has yet to compensate victims.

 

The volume of oil spilt at Bodo was more than 60 times the volume Shell has repeatedly claimed leaked.  This is but one example of a international corporation exploiting the natural resources of a developing country.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:12 PM

This article talks about how Shell seems to have underestimated the damage caused by the oil spill in 2008 when tens of thousands of barrels of oil polluted the land and creeks surrounding Bodo. The spill has compromised the access to clean food and water, destroyed livelyhoods and put health at risk. Shell still has not compositated the people of Bodo with the bags of food to replace what was destroyed nor have they cleaned up the spill. These poor people, they have had so much destroyed and need help from shell and they refuse to step up and take responsibility and do what it right. 

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Biodiversity and linguistic loss linked

Biodiversity and linguistic loss linked | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
A study by US researchers highlights a link between the loss of biologically rich areas and a decline in linguistic and cultural diversity.

Very interesting article that links well to IB core biodiversity, assessing the impact of biodiversity loss on humans.
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Oil Production in the 21st Century and Peak Oil

Oil Production in the 21st Century and Peak Oil | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
A look at the global risks in continuing to drill for oil in the 21st century.

Considers the relationship between supply, consumption and price, very relevant for IB core students. Discusses effects on the environment using deep horizon as an example and offers an opinion on the future of oil.
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What's Up with China's One-Child Policy

What's Up with China's One-Child Policy | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?" This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country.

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The Sahel Crisis, 8 questions answered - UN World Food Program

The Sahel Crisis, 8 questions answered - UN World Food Program | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Sahel Crisis: 8 Questions Answered...

 

A very bad year for the Sahel region of Africa, clearly explained by the WFP. Also see their publications for more detail - http://www.wfp.org/content/west-africa-and-sahel-food-security-and-humanitarian-implications-2012.

 

What is the main cause? An obvious lack of rainfall, or too big a population exceeding the countries carrying capacity?

 

 

 

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Forget the usual tired debates about Africa, it's changing – for the better

Forget the usual tired debates about Africa, it's changing – for the better | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Elsie Kanza: With overseas investment and economic prosperity on the up, and new leaders and entrepreneurs emerging, Africa is rising...
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Chinese food security may be motivating investments in Africa

Chinese food security may be motivating investments in Africa | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Future need to import more food a possible influence in China's engagement with African agriculture, claims study...

 

Is China fearful of a Malthusian food shortage? Is this type of foreign direct investment beneficial to Africa?

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Two Earths would be needed to sustain human activity by 2030, report finds 

Two Earths would be needed to sustain human activity by 2030, report finds  | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Planet Earth in a tight spot. Mankind is draining the earth's resources so quickly the globe would be bled dry before the end of the century at this rate, a new report shows.
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Big foot - countries ecological footprints measured and mapped

Big foot - countries ecological footprints measured and mapped | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
THE ecological footprint is a measurement of the consumption and carbon-dioxide emissions of both individuals and countries. It is expressed by Global Footprint Network (GFN), an NGO, in terms of “global hectares”—the number of hectares of land and sea required to produce the quantities consumed and emitted. This is calculated from the average productivity of six overlapping sorts of area use: arable, forests, grazing land, built-up areas, carbon sequestration and fisheries. The GFN reckons the world had enough productive land and sea to apportion 1.8 global hectares per person in 2008, the latest year for which data are available. If that is right, humans are horribly depleting the planet. The world’s biggest guzzlers are Qataris, who account for the equivalent of 11.7 global hectares per person. Americans account for 7.2 global hectares and western Europeans weigh in at between 8.3 (Denmark) and 4.1 (Portugal). The title of the world’s most modest consumers is shared between Afghans, Timorese and Palestinians, who each consume or emit just 0.5 global hectares.
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Oil in UAE-UAE Market

Oil in UAE-UAE Market | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
The UAE oil reserves account for 8.5 percent of total world reserves, most of which are located in Abu Dhabi. According to Global Insight, the Zakum oil field is the largest in the country, and the third largest in the Middle East, with an estimated 66 billion proven barrels. The UAE has committed itself to infrastructure development and enhanced oil recovery techniques in mature fields.
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Doing Development Better

Doing Development Better | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Does the development spark reside in bottom-up projects, or do macro-level economists have all the answers? The best recent work indicates a convergence of the two camps around diagnostic, pragmatic, experimental, and context-specific strategies.

 

Reformers in this mold are suspicious of "best practices" and universal blueprints. They look instead for policy innovations, small and large, that are tailored to local economic circumstances and political complications.

The field of development policy can and should be reunified around these shared diagnostic, contextual approaches.

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California's Pipe Dream - National Geographic Magazine

California's Pipe Dream - National Geographic Magazine | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Dams, pipes, pumps and canals can't stave off a crisis in California.
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Nigerian Oil

Nigerian Oil | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
The Niger Delta holds some of the world's richest oil deposits, yet Nigerians living there are poorer than ever, violence is rampant, and the land and water are fouled. What went wrong?
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Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers

The "Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers," with Right Livelihood Award Winner Nnimmo Bassey, explores the impacts of climate change and hydropower on the world'...

 

This video is related to our topic as it shows how something like a dam, which one might think is a positive agent for change can have massive a negative impact upon the people in surrounding areas and the environment in general. Something such evaporation in the pooled water reducing available drinking water is something which is easy to misunderstand, but is a real threat in areas which have drinking water issues, such as Sub-Saharan Africa.. The damming of rivers also deprives down stream areas of the water they rely upon. This video is a good introduction to these kinds of ideas, and many others.


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Canada's tar sands: a dangerous solution to offshore oil

Canada's tar sands: a dangerous solution to offshore oil | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Heather McRobie: Alberta is the 'safe' option for US oil needs – but its tar sands are far more environmentally damaging than Deep Horizon. Another great article for IB core resources.
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Google’s Amazon Rainforest Street View Is Ready For You To Explore

Google’s Amazon Rainforest Street View Is Ready For You To Explore | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

"Back in August, Google announced that it was teaming up with nonprofit Foundation for a Sustainable Amazon to map a small section of the massive Rio Negro river (tributary of the Amazon) near Manaus."  Virtual field trip, here we come!


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EcoArchitecture - Tianjin Eco-City

EcoArchitecture - Tianjin Eco-City | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

The 30 square kilometre Tianjin Eco-City is to serve as a model for future developing Chinese cities. As China rapidly modernises, there is need to create a sustainable city model as increasing rural-urban migration places pressures and demands on overtaxed and crowded existing cities. Situated 45 kilometres from Tianjin City and 150 kilometres from the Chinese capital of Beijing, the site of the Tianjin Eco-City is just a 10 minutes drive from the business parks at the Tianjin Economic-Development Area.
Expected to house 350,000 residents when the project is fully completed in 2020, the Tianjin Eco-City is based on the key tenets of people-people, people-environment and people-economy harmony. With 26 Key Performance Indicators (KPI) governing its developmental approaches towards a replicable, scalable and practical eco-city, the Tianjin Eco-City will be the prototype upon which future Chinese cities are modelled upon.
A conscious effort was made not to create a generic city devoid of humanising features or cognitive characteristics, one that is replicated ad infinitum in cities of rapidly developing economies. With the aim of creating a sense of place, the urban design of the scheme is driven by a set of coordinated solutions with theme.

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Green Transport Builds Low-carbon Cities in China

Rapid motorization in China, which was once known as the "Kingdom of Bicycles", has come at a cost to the environment. To address this, World Bank-funded projects promote public transport, walking and biking in Chinese cities, so that they could move toward a low-carbon future.

 

Cities contribute an estimated 70 percent of the energy-related greenhouse gases and are therefore crucial to meeting China’s carbon reduction targets. With China set to add an estimated 350 million residents to its cities over the next 20 years, the case for urgent action is strong.


There is a strong alignment between low-carbon and locally appropriate sustainable development strategies for cities. A low-carbon city is, above all, a sustainable, efficient, livable, and competitive city.


An estimated 40 percent of city emissions comes from power generation and industrial activities each, with the remaining 20 percent from transport, buildings, and waste.
Cities will need to act on multiple fronts, from improving their land-use and spatial development to energy-efficient buildings and industries, from public transport system to efficient management of water, wastewater, and solid waste. Also climate change adaptation needs to be incorporated in the planning, investment decisions, and emergency-preparedness plans of cities.


Actions affecting land-use and spatial development are among the most critical because carbon emissions are closely connected to the urban form. Spatial development has also very strong “locked-in” effects: once cities grow and define their urban form it is almost impossible to retrofit them because the built environment is largely irreversible and very costly to modify.


Five key cross-cutting actions for low-carbon growth include: setting the right indicators to encourage low-carbon growth; complementing administrative measures with market-based approaches and tools; breaking the link between land use, finance and urban sprawl; encouraging more intersectoral and interjurisdictional cooperation; and balanceing mitigation and adaptation measures.


Actions will need to focus on addressing specific sectoral challenges, particularly those related to energy, transport, and other municipal services including water and waste management services. There are lessons to be learned from the experience of Chinese cities and World Bank-supported programs


Implementing a comprehensive multisectoral policy agenda requires coordinated action from a range of stakeholders including different levels of government, civil society, and citizens.


China has an opportunity to implement low-carbon strategies and approaches during the 12th Five-Year Plan period and beyond. This will make its future cities more sustainable, more efficient, more competitive, and more livable.

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Hard Rain Trailer - UNDP

Hard Rain is a two-part independent production on climate change and human development in Asia and the Pacific. The films focus on how people in Kiribati, India, the Philippines and Viet Nam are adapting to climate risks

 

See Part two of the 'Hard Rain' Trailer, focussing on peoples responses to these climatic issues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=S_sIjvLJez4

 

 

The 'One planet to share' report, wirtten in the build up to Rio+20 can be downlaoded here: http://asiapacific-hdr.aprc.undp.org/

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